Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/620667
Title:
Seeds: Sembrando Futuros
Author:
Galup, Maria Cecilia I.
Issue Date:
2016
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
"Somos semillas" -we are seeds is a slogan, a sentiment, and a belief that emerges and circulates in a myriad of spaces from Ferguson Black Lives Matter protests advocating for racial justice in the United States, to struggles against state violence in Ayotzinapa, Mexico, to climate justice and food sovereignty movements in Latin America. Seeds are both symbolic and material embodiments of futurity. In this dissertation, I examine the discourses around seeds, particularly genetically modified seeds (GM), and the role of biotechnology as our only purveyor of futurity. In "Seeds", I examine the dominant discourses around GM seeds produced by pro-GM actors such as agro-industries including Monsanto and Syngenta, and USDAID programs such as Feed the Future. These discourses are constructed around social and environmental looming crises that include hunger and overpopulation, loss of biodiversity and climate change. In "Seeds", thinking through the decolonial option, I challenge the single Western narrative that presents GM seeds and crops as the only path to solve these crises and for humanity to have a utopian future."Seeds" takes on 'studying up' approach that as scholar Laura Nader argues investigates those in power instead of those that are being oppressed."Seeds" then works alongside other academic, indigenous, campesin@s, and farmer intellectuals and activists to elucidate a number of ways that people around the world are engaging with such crises and are building different paths to decolonial futures.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
Decoloniality; Environmental Justice; Genetically Modified Seeds; Social Justice; Utopia; Gender & Women's Studies; Cultural Studies
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Gender and Women's Studies
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Luibhèid, Eithne

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.titleSeeds: Sembrando Futurosen_US
dc.creatorGalup, Maria Cecilia I.en
dc.contributor.authorGalup, Maria Cecilia I.en
dc.date.issued2016-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en
dc.description.abstract"Somos semillas" -we are seeds is a slogan, a sentiment, and a belief that emerges and circulates in a myriad of spaces from Ferguson Black Lives Matter protests advocating for racial justice in the United States, to struggles against state violence in Ayotzinapa, Mexico, to climate justice and food sovereignty movements in Latin America. Seeds are both symbolic and material embodiments of futurity. In this dissertation, I examine the discourses around seeds, particularly genetically modified seeds (GM), and the role of biotechnology as our only purveyor of futurity. In "Seeds", I examine the dominant discourses around GM seeds produced by pro-GM actors such as agro-industries including Monsanto and Syngenta, and USDAID programs such as Feed the Future. These discourses are constructed around social and environmental looming crises that include hunger and overpopulation, loss of biodiversity and climate change. In "Seeds", thinking through the decolonial option, I challenge the single Western narrative that presents GM seeds and crops as the only path to solve these crises and for humanity to have a utopian future."Seeds" takes on 'studying up' approach that as scholar Laura Nader argues investigates those in power instead of those that are being oppressed."Seeds" then works alongside other academic, indigenous, campesin@s, and farmer intellectuals and activists to elucidate a number of ways that people around the world are engaging with such crises and are building different paths to decolonial futures.en
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen
dc.subjectDecolonialityen
dc.subjectEnvironmental Justiceen
dc.subjectGenetically Modified Seedsen
dc.subjectSocial Justiceen
dc.subjectUtopiaen
dc.subjectGender & Women's Studiesen
dc.subjectCultural Studiesen
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen
thesis.degree.disciplineGender and Women's Studiesen
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen
dc.contributor.advisorLuibhèid, Eithneen
dc.contributor.committeememberJones, John Paulen
dc.contributor.committeememberBriggs, Laura J.en
dc.contributor.committeememberLuibhèid, Eithneen
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