Development of an Experimentally Validated Finite Element Model for Spark Plasma Sintering of High Temperature Ceramics

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/620665
Title:
Development of an Experimentally Validated Finite Element Model for Spark Plasma Sintering of High Temperature Ceramics
Author:
Neff, Paul K.
Issue Date:
2016
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Spark plasma sintering (SPS) is a powder consolidation technique used to rapidly densify a variety of material systems. SPS is capable of precisely controlling material microstructures and achieving non-equilibrium phases due to rapid heating and cooling rates through the simultaneous application of pressure and direct current. Due to these characteristics, SPS is an ideal processing technique for high temperature ceramics which require processing at temperatures greater than 1500°C. Due to the desirable properties obtained on small diameter materials processed by SPS, larger and more complex geometries are desired while maintaining sample microstructures.In order to accurately scale ceramics produced by SPS, a finite element model must be developed that can be used as a predictive tool. My research focuses on developing a finite element model for the spark plasma sintering furnace at the University of Arizona and validating modeled results using experimentally obtained data. Electrical and thermal conductivity as functions of temperature vary widely among different grades of commercially available electrode grade graphite at constant density. Modeled material properties are optimized in order to calibrate modeled results to experimentally obtained data (i.e. measured current, voltage, and temperature distributions). Sensitivity analysis is performed on the model to better understand model physics and predictions.A calibrated model is presented for 20mm ZrB2 and Si3N4 discs. Sample temperature gradients are experimentally confirmed using grain size and β-Si3N4 phase composition. The model is used to investigate scale up from 20mm to 30mm discs and 30mm rings as well as effects of processing conditions on β-Si3N4 content.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Keywords:
Field Assisted Sintering Technology; Finite Element Model; Silicon Nitride; Spark Plasma Sintering; Zirconium Diboride; Materials Science & Engineering; Complex Shapes
Degree Name:
M.S.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Materials Science and Engineering
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Corral, Erica L.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.titleDevelopment of an Experimentally Validated Finite Element Model for Spark Plasma Sintering of High Temperature Ceramicsen_US
dc.creatorNeff, Paul K.en
dc.contributor.authorNeff, Paul K.en
dc.date.issued2016-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en
dc.description.abstractSpark plasma sintering (SPS) is a powder consolidation technique used to rapidly densify a variety of material systems. SPS is capable of precisely controlling material microstructures and achieving non-equilibrium phases due to rapid heating and cooling rates through the simultaneous application of pressure and direct current. Due to these characteristics, SPS is an ideal processing technique for high temperature ceramics which require processing at temperatures greater than 1500°C. Due to the desirable properties obtained on small diameter materials processed by SPS, larger and more complex geometries are desired while maintaining sample microstructures.In order to accurately scale ceramics produced by SPS, a finite element model must be developed that can be used as a predictive tool. My research focuses on developing a finite element model for the spark plasma sintering furnace at the University of Arizona and validating modeled results using experimentally obtained data. Electrical and thermal conductivity as functions of temperature vary widely among different grades of commercially available electrode grade graphite at constant density. Modeled material properties are optimized in order to calibrate modeled results to experimentally obtained data (i.e. measured current, voltage, and temperature distributions). Sensitivity analysis is performed on the model to better understand model physics and predictions.A calibrated model is presented for 20mm ZrB2 and Si3N4 discs. Sample temperature gradients are experimentally confirmed using grain size and β-Si3N4 phase composition. The model is used to investigate scale up from 20mm to 30mm discs and 30mm rings as well as effects of processing conditions on β-Si3N4 content.en
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen
dc.subjectField Assisted Sintering Technologyen
dc.subjectFinite Element Modelen
dc.subjectSilicon Nitrideen
dc.subjectSpark Plasma Sinteringen
dc.subjectZirconium Diborideen
dc.subjectMaterials Science & Engineeringen
dc.subjectComplex Shapesen
thesis.degree.nameM.S.en
thesis.degree.levelmastersen
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen
thesis.degree.disciplineMaterials Science and Engineeringen
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen
dc.contributor.advisorCorral, Erica L.en
dc.contributor.committeememberLoy, Douglasen
dc.contributor.committeememberMuralidharan, Krishnaen
dc.contributor.committeememberMissoum, Samyen
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