The Interaction of State and Trait Worry on Response Monitoring in Those with Worry and Obsessive-Compulsive Symptoms

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/620615
Title:
The Interaction of State and Trait Worry on Response Monitoring in Those with Worry and Obsessive-Compulsive Symptoms
Author:
Zambrano-Vazquez, Laura
Issue Date:
2016
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The error related negativity (ERN) is an event-related brain potential that is sensitive to errors. It reflects individual differences in the extent to which individuals recruit neural systems involved in monitoring errors and systems for cognitive control that then make adjustments to future behavior. It has been closely linked to anxiety through diverse disorders and symptoms, but recently evidence highlights the role of anxious apprehension as a key individual difference related to error monitoring. Diverse hypotheses have emerged to explain this relationship. While some views emphasize the role of motivation and emotion, others suggest that a transient compensatory control is responsible for this relationship. Although both theories recognize the potential for state anxiety to potentiate the ERN, there is limited literature that allows a comparison of these competing hypotheses. The present study investigated the interaction of state and trait anxiety on the ERN by comparing ERN amplitude before and after a five minute worry induction period that specifically targeted each individual's greatest current worries. Results did not unequivocally support one specific theory, but rather provide some preliminary evidence of how trait and state worry may interact and affect the ERN. Suggestions for future research are provided, including using worry induction paradigms in which the worries increase threat or significance of errors.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
ERN; ERPs; State Worry; Worry; Psychology; Anxiety
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Psychology
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Allen, John J.B.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.titleThe Interaction of State and Trait Worry on Response Monitoring in Those with Worry and Obsessive-Compulsive Symptomsen_US
dc.creatorZambrano-Vazquez, Lauraen
dc.contributor.authorZambrano-Vazquez, Lauraen
dc.date.issued2016-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en
dc.description.abstractThe error related negativity (ERN) is an event-related brain potential that is sensitive to errors. It reflects individual differences in the extent to which individuals recruit neural systems involved in monitoring errors and systems for cognitive control that then make adjustments to future behavior. It has been closely linked to anxiety through diverse disorders and symptoms, but recently evidence highlights the role of anxious apprehension as a key individual difference related to error monitoring. Diverse hypotheses have emerged to explain this relationship. While some views emphasize the role of motivation and emotion, others suggest that a transient compensatory control is responsible for this relationship. Although both theories recognize the potential for state anxiety to potentiate the ERN, there is limited literature that allows a comparison of these competing hypotheses. The present study investigated the interaction of state and trait anxiety on the ERN by comparing ERN amplitude before and after a five minute worry induction period that specifically targeted each individual's greatest current worries. Results did not unequivocally support one specific theory, but rather provide some preliminary evidence of how trait and state worry may interact and affect the ERN. Suggestions for future research are provided, including using worry induction paradigms in which the worries increase threat or significance of errors.en
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen
dc.subjectERNen
dc.subjectERPsen
dc.subjectState Worryen
dc.subjectWorryen
dc.subjectPsychologyen
dc.subjectAnxietyen
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen
thesis.degree.disciplinePsychologyen
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen
dc.contributor.advisorAllen, John J.B.en
dc.contributor.committeememberAllen, John J.B.en
dc.contributor.committeememberSbarra, Daviden
dc.contributor.committeememberO'Connor, Mary-Francesen
dc.contributor.committeememberHaynes, Patriciaen
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