Can bilingual children turn one language off? Evidence from perceptual switching.

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/620189
Title:
Can bilingual children turn one language off? Evidence from perceptual switching.
Author:
Singh, Leher; Quam, Carolyn
Affiliation:
Univ Arizona, Dept Speech Language & Hearing Sci; Univ Arizona, Dept Psychol
Issue Date:
2016-07
Publisher:
Elsevier Inc.
Citation:
Can bilingual children turn one language off? Evidence from perceptual switching. 2016, 147:111-25 J Exp Child Psychol
Journal:
Journal of experimental child psychology
Rights:
© 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
Collection Information:
This item from the UA Faculty Publications collection is made available by the University of Arizona with support from the University of Arizona Libraries. If you have questions, please contact us at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.
Abstract:
Bilinguals have the sole option of conversing in one language in spite of knowing two languages. The question of how bilinguals alternate between their two languages, activating and deactivating one language, is not well understood. In the current study, we investigated the development of this process by researching bilingual children's abilities to selectively integrate lexical tone based on its relevance in the language being used. In particular, the current study sought to determine the effects of global conversation-level cues versus local (within-word phonotactic) cues on children's tone integration in newly learned words. Words were taught to children via a conversational narrative, and word recognition was investigated using the intermodal preferential-looking paradigm. Children were tested on recognition of words with stimuli that were either matched or mismatched in tone in both English and Mandarin conversations. Results demonstrated that 3- to 4-year-olds did not adapt their interpretation of lexical tone changes to the language being spoken. In contrast, 4- to 5-year-olds were able to do so when supported by informative within-word cues. Results suggest that preschool children are capable of selectively activating a single language given word-internal cues to language.
Note:
Available online 11 April 2016. 24 month embargo.
ISSN:
1096-0457
PubMed ID:
27077335
DOI:
10.1016/j.jecp.2016.03.006
Keywords:
Bilingualism; Lexical tone; Language development; Novel word learning; Mandarin Chinese; Childhood
Version:
Final accepted manuscript
Sponsors:
Ministry of Education Tier 1 Academic Research Fund [FY2013FRC2-009]
Additional Links:
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27077335

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorSingh, Leheren
dc.contributor.authorQuam, Carolynen
dc.date.accessioned2016-09-16T23:31:00Z-
dc.date.available2016-09-16T23:31:00Z-
dc.date.issued2016-07-
dc.identifier.citationCan bilingual children turn one language off? Evidence from perceptual switching. 2016, 147:111-25 J Exp Child Psycholen
dc.identifier.issn1096-0457-
dc.identifier.pmid27077335-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.jecp.2016.03.006-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/620189-
dc.description.abstractBilinguals have the sole option of conversing in one language in spite of knowing two languages. The question of how bilinguals alternate between their two languages, activating and deactivating one language, is not well understood. In the current study, we investigated the development of this process by researching bilingual children's abilities to selectively integrate lexical tone based on its relevance in the language being used. In particular, the current study sought to determine the effects of global conversation-level cues versus local (within-word phonotactic) cues on children's tone integration in newly learned words. Words were taught to children via a conversational narrative, and word recognition was investigated using the intermodal preferential-looking paradigm. Children were tested on recognition of words with stimuli that were either matched or mismatched in tone in both English and Mandarin conversations. Results demonstrated that 3- to 4-year-olds did not adapt their interpretation of lexical tone changes to the language being spoken. In contrast, 4- to 5-year-olds were able to do so when supported by informative within-word cues. Results suggest that preschool children are capable of selectively activating a single language given word-internal cues to language.en
dc.description.sponsorshipMinistry of Education Tier 1 Academic Research Fund [FY2013FRC2-009]en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherElsevier Inc.en
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27077335en
dc.rights© 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.en
dc.subjectBilingualismen
dc.subjectLexical toneen
dc.subjectLanguage developmenten
dc.subjectNovel word learningen
dc.subjectMandarin Chineseen
dc.subjectChildhooden
dc.titleCan bilingual children turn one language off? Evidence from perceptual switching.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniv Arizona, Dept Speech Language & Hearing Scien
dc.contributor.departmentUniv Arizona, Dept Psycholen
dc.identifier.journalJournal of experimental child psychologyen
dc.description.noteAvailable online 11 April 2016. 24 month embargo.en
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item from the UA Faculty Publications collection is made available by the University of Arizona with support from the University of Arizona Libraries. If you have questions, please contact us at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.en
dc.eprint.versionFinal accepted manuscripten
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