Neurons are the Primary Target Cell for the Brain-Tropic Intracellular Parasite Toxoplasma gondii

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/618981
Title:
Neurons are the Primary Target Cell for the Brain-Tropic Intracellular Parasite Toxoplasma gondii
Author:
Cabral, Carla M.; Tuladhar, Shraddha; Dietrich, Hans K.; Nguyen, Elizabeth; MacDonald, Wes R.; Trivedi, Tapasya; Devineni, Asha; Koshy, Anita A.
Affiliation:
Univ Arizona, Inst BIO5; Univ Arizona, Dept Immunobiol; Univ Arizona, Dept Neurol
Issue Date:
2016-02-19
Publisher:
Public Library of Science
Citation:
Neurons are the Primary Target Cell for the Brain-Tropic Intracellular Parasite Toxoplasma gondii 2016, 12 (2):e1005447 PLOS Pathogens
Journal:
PLOS Pathogens
Rights:
© 2016 Cabral et al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.
Collection Information:
This item from the UA Faculty Publications collection is made available by the University of Arizona with support from the University of Arizona Libraries. If you have questions, please contact us at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.
Abstract:
Toxoplasma gondii, a common brain-tropic parasite, is capable of infecting most nucleated cells, including astrocytes and neurons, in vitro. Yet, in vivo, Toxoplasma is primarily found in neurons. In vitro data showing that interferon-gamma-stimulated astrocytes, but not neurons, clear intracellular parasites suggest that neurons alone are persistently infected in vivo because they lack the ability to clear intracellular parasites. Here we test this theory by using a novel Toxoplasma-mouse model capable of marking and tracking host cells that directly interact with parasites, even if the interaction is transient. Remarkably, we find that Toxoplasma shows a strong predilection for interacting with neurons throughout CNS infection. This predilection remains in the setting of IFN-gamma depletion; infection with parasites resistant to the major mechanism by which murine astrocytes clear parasites; or when directly injecting parasites into the brain. These findings, in combination with prior work, strongly suggest that neurons are not incidentally infected, but rather they are Toxoplasma's primary in vivo target.
Note:
Open Access Journal
ISSN:
1553-7374
PubMed ID:
26895155
DOI:
10.1371/journal.ppat.1005447
Version:
Final published version
Sponsors:
National Institute of Neurologic Disorders and Stroke [NS65116]; Howard Hughes Medical Institute [52003749]; BIO5 Institute, University of Arizona
Additional Links:
http://dx.plos.org/10.1371/journal.ppat.1005447

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorCabral, Carla M.en
dc.contributor.authorTuladhar, Shraddhaen
dc.contributor.authorDietrich, Hans K.en
dc.contributor.authorNguyen, Elizabethen
dc.contributor.authorMacDonald, Wes R.en
dc.contributor.authorTrivedi, Tapasyaen
dc.contributor.authorDevineni, Ashaen
dc.contributor.authorKoshy, Anita A.en
dc.date.accessioned2016-08-27T00:56:38Z-
dc.date.available2016-08-27T00:56:38Z-
dc.date.issued2016-02-19-
dc.identifier.citationNeurons are the Primary Target Cell for the Brain-Tropic Intracellular Parasite Toxoplasma gondii 2016, 12 (2):e1005447 PLOS Pathogensen
dc.identifier.issn1553-7374-
dc.identifier.pmid26895155-
dc.identifier.doi10.1371/journal.ppat.1005447-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/618981-
dc.description.abstractToxoplasma gondii, a common brain-tropic parasite, is capable of infecting most nucleated cells, including astrocytes and neurons, in vitro. Yet, in vivo, Toxoplasma is primarily found in neurons. In vitro data showing that interferon-gamma-stimulated astrocytes, but not neurons, clear intracellular parasites suggest that neurons alone are persistently infected in vivo because they lack the ability to clear intracellular parasites. Here we test this theory by using a novel Toxoplasma-mouse model capable of marking and tracking host cells that directly interact with parasites, even if the interaction is transient. Remarkably, we find that Toxoplasma shows a strong predilection for interacting with neurons throughout CNS infection. This predilection remains in the setting of IFN-gamma depletion; infection with parasites resistant to the major mechanism by which murine astrocytes clear parasites; or when directly injecting parasites into the brain. These findings, in combination with prior work, strongly suggest that neurons are not incidentally infected, but rather they are Toxoplasma's primary in vivo target.en
dc.description.sponsorshipNational Institute of Neurologic Disorders and Stroke [NS65116]; Howard Hughes Medical Institute [52003749]; BIO5 Institute, University of Arizonaen
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherPublic Library of Scienceen
dc.relation.urlhttp://dx.plos.org/10.1371/journal.ppat.1005447en
dc.rights© 2016 Cabral et al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.en
dc.titleNeurons are the Primary Target Cell for the Brain-Tropic Intracellular Parasite Toxoplasma gondiien
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniv Arizona, Inst BIO5en
dc.contributor.departmentUniv Arizona, Dept Immunobiolen
dc.contributor.departmentUniv Arizona, Dept Neurolen
dc.identifier.journalPLOS Pathogensen
dc.description.noteOpen Access Journalen
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item from the UA Faculty Publications collection is made available by the University of Arizona with support from the University of Arizona Libraries. If you have questions, please contact us at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.en
dc.eprint.versionFinal published versionen

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