Temporal assessment of nanoparticle accumulation after experimental brain injury: Effect of particle size.

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/618975
Title:
Temporal assessment of nanoparticle accumulation after experimental brain injury: Effect of particle size.
Author:
Bharadwaj, Vimala N; Lifshitz, Jonathan; Adelson, P David; Kodibagkar, Vikram D; Stabenfeldt, Sarah E
Affiliation:
Univ Arizona, Coll Med Phoenix, Dept Child Hlth
Issue Date:
2016
Publisher:
NATURE PUBLISHING GROUP
Citation:
Temporal assessment of nanoparticle accumulation after experimental brain injury: Effect of particle size. 2016, 6:29988 Sci Rep
Journal:
Scientific reports
Rights:
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in the credit line; if the material is not included under the Creative Commons license, users will need to obtain permission from the license holder to reproduce the material. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
Collection Information:
This item from the UA Faculty Publications collection is made available by the University of Arizona with support from the University of Arizona Libraries. If you have questions, please contact us at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.
Abstract:
Nanoparticle (NP) based therapeutic and theranostic agents have been developed for various diseases, yet application to neural disease/injury is restricted by the blood-brain-barrier (BBB). Traumatic brain injury (TBI) results in a host of pathological alterations, including transient breakdown of the BBB, thus opening a window for NP delivery to the injured brain tissue. This study focused on investigating the spatiotemporal accumulation of different sized NPs after TBI. Specifically, animal cohorts sustaining a controlled cortical impact injury received an intravenous injection of PEGylated NP cocktail (20, 40, 100, and 500 nm, each with a unique fluorophore) immediately (0 h), 2 h, 5 h, 12 h, or 23 h after injury. NPs were allowed to circulate for 1 h before perfusion and brain harvest. Confocal microscopy demonstrated peak NP accumulation within the injury penumbra 1 h post-injury. An inverse relationship was found between NP size and their continued accumulation within the penumbra. NP accumulation preferentially occurred in the primary motor and somatosensory areas of the injury penumbra as compared to the parietal association and visual area. Thus, we characterized the accumulation of particles up to 500 nm at different times acutely after injury, indicating the potential of NP-based TBI theranostics in the acute period after injury.
Note:
Open Access Journal
ISSN:
2045-2322
PubMed ID:
27444615
DOI:
10.1038/srep29988
Version:
Final published version
Sponsors:
FLINN Foundation; NIH [1DP2HD084067]
Additional Links:
http://www.nature.com/articles/srep29988

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorBharadwaj, Vimala Nen
dc.contributor.authorLifshitz, Jonathanen
dc.contributor.authorAdelson, P Daviden
dc.contributor.authorKodibagkar, Vikram Den
dc.contributor.authorStabenfeldt, Sarah Een
dc.date.accessioned2016-08-27T00:47:50Z-
dc.date.available2016-08-27T00:47:50Z-
dc.date.issued2016-
dc.identifier.citationTemporal assessment of nanoparticle accumulation after experimental brain injury: Effect of particle size. 2016, 6:29988 Sci Repen
dc.identifier.issn2045-2322-
dc.identifier.pmid27444615-
dc.identifier.doi10.1038/srep29988-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/618975-
dc.description.abstractNanoparticle (NP) based therapeutic and theranostic agents have been developed for various diseases, yet application to neural disease/injury is restricted by the blood-brain-barrier (BBB). Traumatic brain injury (TBI) results in a host of pathological alterations, including transient breakdown of the BBB, thus opening a window for NP delivery to the injured brain tissue. This study focused on investigating the spatiotemporal accumulation of different sized NPs after TBI. Specifically, animal cohorts sustaining a controlled cortical impact injury received an intravenous injection of PEGylated NP cocktail (20, 40, 100, and 500 nm, each with a unique fluorophore) immediately (0 h), 2 h, 5 h, 12 h, or 23 h after injury. NPs were allowed to circulate for 1 h before perfusion and brain harvest. Confocal microscopy demonstrated peak NP accumulation within the injury penumbra 1 h post-injury. An inverse relationship was found between NP size and their continued accumulation within the penumbra. NP accumulation preferentially occurred in the primary motor and somatosensory areas of the injury penumbra as compared to the parietal association and visual area. Thus, we characterized the accumulation of particles up to 500 nm at different times acutely after injury, indicating the potential of NP-based TBI theranostics in the acute period after injury.en
dc.description.sponsorshipFLINN Foundation; NIH [1DP2HD084067]en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherNATURE PUBLISHING GROUPen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.nature.com/articles/srep29988en
dc.rightsThis work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in the credit line; if the material is not included under the Creative Commons license, users will need to obtain permission from the license holder to reproduce the material. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/en
dc.titleTemporal assessment of nanoparticle accumulation after experimental brain injury: Effect of particle size.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniv Arizona, Coll Med Phoenix, Dept Child Hlthen
dc.identifier.journalScientific reportsen
dc.description.noteOpen Access Journalen
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item from the UA Faculty Publications collection is made available by the University of Arizona with support from the University of Arizona Libraries. If you have questions, please contact us at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.en
dc.eprint.versionFinal published versionen

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