Opening the Black Box: Using a Hydrological Model to Link Stakeholder Engagement with Groundwater Management

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/618961
Title:
Opening the Black Box: Using a Hydrological Model to Link Stakeholder Engagement with Groundwater Management
Author:
Eden, Susanna; Megdal, Sharon; Shamir, Eylon; Chief, Karletta; Mott Lacroix, Kelly
Affiliation:
Univ Arizona, Coll Agr & Life Sci, Water Resources Res Ctr; Univ Arizona, Dept Soil Water & Environm Sci
Issue Date:
2016-05-23
Publisher:
MDPI AG
Citation:
Opening the Black Box: Using a Hydrological Model to Link Stakeholder Engagement with Groundwater Management 2016, 8 (5):216 Water
Journal:
Water
Rights:
© 2016 by the authors; licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland. This article is an open access article distributed under the terms and conditions of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC-BY) license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/).
Collection Information:
This item from the UA Faculty Publications collection is made available by the University of Arizona with support from the University of Arizona Libraries. If you have questions, please contact us at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.
Abstract:
Stakeholder participation is a foundation of good water governance. Good groundwater governance typically involves the co-production of knowledge about the groundwater system. Models provide a vehicle for producing this knowledge, as well as a boundary object around which scientists and stakeholders can convene the co-production process. Through co-production, stakeholders and scientific experts can engage in exchanges that create system knowledge not otherwise achievable. The process involves one-way transfer of information, active two-way conversations, and integration of multiple kinds of knowledge into shared understanding. In the Upper Santa Cruz River basin in Arizona, USA, the University of Arizona Water Resources Research Center (WRRC) convened a project aimed at providing scientific underpinnings for groundwater planning and management. This project, entitled Groundwater, Climate, and Stakeholder Engagement, serves as a case study employing the first two stages of knowledge co-production using a hydrological model. Through an iterative process that included two-way communication, stakeholders provided critical input to hydrologic modeling analyses. Acting as a bridging organization, the WRRC facilitated a co-production process, involving location-specific and transferability workshops, which resulted in new knowledge and capacity for applying the model to novel problems.
Note:
Open Access Journal
ISSN:
2073-4441
DOI:
10.3390/w8050216
Keywords:
groundwater modeling; groundwater management; stakeholder engagement; knowledge co-production; Santa Cruz River Basin
Version:
Final published version
Sponsors:
NOAA Climate and Societal Interactions Sectoral Applications Research Program (NOAA) [NA12OAR4310099]; University of Arizona Technology and Research Initiative Fund; Arizona Department of Water Resources [2015-2994IGA]; Conservation Assistance Fund
Additional Links:
http://www.mdpi.com/2073-4441/8/5/216

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorEden, Susannaen
dc.contributor.authorMegdal, Sharonen
dc.contributor.authorShamir, Eylonen
dc.contributor.authorChief, Karlettaen
dc.contributor.authorMott Lacroix, Kellyen
dc.date.accessioned2016-08-27T01:03:11Z-
dc.date.available2016-08-27T01:03:11Z-
dc.date.issued2016-05-23-
dc.identifier.citationOpening the Black Box: Using a Hydrological Model to Link Stakeholder Engagement with Groundwater Management 2016, 8 (5):216 Wateren
dc.identifier.issn2073-4441-
dc.identifier.doi10.3390/w8050216-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/618961-
dc.description.abstractStakeholder participation is a foundation of good water governance. Good groundwater governance typically involves the co-production of knowledge about the groundwater system. Models provide a vehicle for producing this knowledge, as well as a boundary object around which scientists and stakeholders can convene the co-production process. Through co-production, stakeholders and scientific experts can engage in exchanges that create system knowledge not otherwise achievable. The process involves one-way transfer of information, active two-way conversations, and integration of multiple kinds of knowledge into shared understanding. In the Upper Santa Cruz River basin in Arizona, USA, the University of Arizona Water Resources Research Center (WRRC) convened a project aimed at providing scientific underpinnings for groundwater planning and management. This project, entitled Groundwater, Climate, and Stakeholder Engagement, serves as a case study employing the first two stages of knowledge co-production using a hydrological model. Through an iterative process that included two-way communication, stakeholders provided critical input to hydrologic modeling analyses. Acting as a bridging organization, the WRRC facilitated a co-production process, involving location-specific and transferability workshops, which resulted in new knowledge and capacity for applying the model to novel problems.en
dc.description.sponsorshipNOAA Climate and Societal Interactions Sectoral Applications Research Program (NOAA) [NA12OAR4310099]; University of Arizona Technology and Research Initiative Fund; Arizona Department of Water Resources [2015-2994IGA]; Conservation Assistance Funden
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherMDPI AGen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.mdpi.com/2073-4441/8/5/216en
dc.rights© 2016 by the authors; licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland. This article is an open access article distributed under the terms and conditions of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC-BY) license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/).en
dc.subjectgroundwater modelingen
dc.subjectgroundwater managementen
dc.subjectstakeholder engagementen
dc.subjectknowledge co-productionen
dc.subjectSanta Cruz River Basinen
dc.titleOpening the Black Box: Using a Hydrological Model to Link Stakeholder Engagement with Groundwater Managementen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniv Arizona, Coll Agr & Life Sci, Water Resources Res Ctren
dc.contributor.departmentUniv Arizona, Dept Soil Water & Environm Scien
dc.identifier.journalWateren
dc.description.noteOpen Access Journalen
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item from the UA Faculty Publications collection is made available by the University of Arizona with support from the University of Arizona Libraries. If you have questions, please contact us at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.en
dc.eprint.versionFinal published versionen
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