Imaging of targeted lipid microbubbles to detect cancer cells using third harmonic generation microscopy

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/618955
Title:
Imaging of targeted lipid microbubbles to detect cancer cells using third harmonic generation microscopy
Author:
Harpel, Kaitlin; Baker, Robert Dawson; Amirsolaimani, Babak; Mehravar, Soroush; Vagner, Josef; Matsunaga, Terry O.; Banerjee, Bhaskar; Kieu, Khanh
Affiliation:
Univ Arizona, Dept Biomed Engn; Univ Arizona, Coll Med, Dept Med Imaging; Univ Arizona, Coll Opt Sci; Univ Arizona, Inst BIO5, Ligand Discovery Lab; Univ Arizona, Coll Med, Dept Med
Issue Date:
2016-06-28
Publisher:
OPTICAL SOC AMER
Citation:
Imaging of targeted lipid microbubbles to detect cancer cells using third harmonic generation microscopy 2016, 7 (7):2849 Biomedical Optics Express
Journal:
Biomedical Optics Express
Rights:
©2016 Optical Society of America
Collection Information:
This item from the UA Faculty Publications collection is made available by the University of Arizona with support from the University of Arizona Libraries. If you have questions, please contact us at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.
Abstract:
The use of receptor-targeted lipid microbubbles imaged by ultrasound is an innovative method of detecting and localizing disease. However, since ultrasound requires a medium between the transducer and the object being imaged, it is impractical to apply to an exposed surface in a surgical setting where sterile fields need be maintained and ultrasound gel may cause the bubbles to collapse. Multiphoton microscopy (MPM) is an emerging tool for accurate, label-free imaging of tissues and cells with high resolution and contrast. We have recently determined a novel application of MPM to be used for detecting targeted microbubble adherence to the upregulated plectin-receptor on pancreatic tumor cells. Specifically, the third-harmonic generation response can be used to detect bound microbubbles to various cell types presenting MPM as an alternative and useful imaging method. This is an interesting technique that can potentially be translated as a diagnostic tool for the early detection of cancer and inflammatory disorders. (C) 2016 Optical Society of America
Note:
Open Access Journal
ISSN:
2156-7085; 2156-7085
PubMed ID:
27446711
DOI:
10.1364/BOE.7.002849
Version:
Final published version
Sponsors:
Department of Medical Imaging; Harry Barrett fellowship; State of Arizona TRIF
Additional Links:
https://www.osapublishing.org/abstract.cfm?URI=boe-7-7-2849

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorHarpel, Kaitlinen
dc.contributor.authorBaker, Robert Dawsonen
dc.contributor.authorAmirsolaimani, Babaken
dc.contributor.authorMehravar, Soroushen
dc.contributor.authorVagner, Josefen
dc.contributor.authorMatsunaga, Terry O.en
dc.contributor.authorBanerjee, Bhaskaren
dc.contributor.authorKieu, Khanhen
dc.date.accessioned2016-08-27T00:45:29Z-
dc.date.available2016-08-27T00:45:29Z-
dc.date.issued2016-06-28-
dc.identifier.citationImaging of targeted lipid microbubbles to detect cancer cells using third harmonic generation microscopy 2016, 7 (7):2849 Biomedical Optics Expressen
dc.identifier.issn2156-7085-
dc.identifier.issn2156-7085-
dc.identifier.pmid27446711-
dc.identifier.doi10.1364/BOE.7.002849-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/618955-
dc.description.abstractThe use of receptor-targeted lipid microbubbles imaged by ultrasound is an innovative method of detecting and localizing disease. However, since ultrasound requires a medium between the transducer and the object being imaged, it is impractical to apply to an exposed surface in a surgical setting where sterile fields need be maintained and ultrasound gel may cause the bubbles to collapse. Multiphoton microscopy (MPM) is an emerging tool for accurate, label-free imaging of tissues and cells with high resolution and contrast. We have recently determined a novel application of MPM to be used for detecting targeted microbubble adherence to the upregulated plectin-receptor on pancreatic tumor cells. Specifically, the third-harmonic generation response can be used to detect bound microbubbles to various cell types presenting MPM as an alternative and useful imaging method. This is an interesting technique that can potentially be translated as a diagnostic tool for the early detection of cancer and inflammatory disorders. (C) 2016 Optical Society of Americaen
dc.description.sponsorshipDepartment of Medical Imaging; Harry Barrett fellowship; State of Arizona TRIFen
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherOPTICAL SOC AMERen
dc.relation.urlhttps://www.osapublishing.org/abstract.cfm?URI=boe-7-7-2849en
dc.rights©2016 Optical Society of Americaen
dc.titleImaging of targeted lipid microbubbles to detect cancer cells using third harmonic generation microscopyen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniv Arizona, Dept Biomed Engnen
dc.contributor.departmentUniv Arizona, Coll Med, Dept Med Imagingen
dc.contributor.departmentUniv Arizona, Coll Opt Scien
dc.contributor.departmentUniv Arizona, Inst BIO5, Ligand Discovery Laben
dc.contributor.departmentUniv Arizona, Coll Med, Dept Meden
dc.identifier.journalBiomedical Optics Expressen
dc.description.noteOpen Access Journalen
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item from the UA Faculty Publications collection is made available by the University of Arizona with support from the University of Arizona Libraries. If you have questions, please contact us at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.en
dc.eprint.versionFinal published versionen

Related articles on PubMed

All Items in UA Campus Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.