GENE EXPRESSION AND AGGRESSIVE BEHAVIOR IN THE TOXIC ALGA PRYMNESIUM PARVUM

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/618704
Title:
GENE EXPRESSION AND AGGRESSIVE BEHAVIOR IN THE TOXIC ALGA PRYMNESIUM PARVUM
Author:
CLARK, MEARA ANN
Issue Date:
2016
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The toxic alga Prymnesium parvum lives in freshwater environments, and deprived of nutrients, it can cause harmful algal blooms. These blooms are responsible for substantial ecological and economic damage, and they are spreading into new water ways in the Western United States. All the individuals in a bloom do not behave the same, some are more aggressive than others. The genetics behind aggression is difficult to understand because the strains share a very similar genome content. Three loci were chosen for observation due to their differential expression between the strains, and possible relationship to toxicity. One is believed be involved directly with the toxin, and two are α-subunits for G-protein coupled receptors which are involved in signal transduction. The results show that one α-subunit is highly expressed in the aggressive strains and the other is being expressed in the passive strain. Both probably have an effect on the difference in phenotype. From a comparison of α-subunits that have similar structures it was concluded that one appeared to be involved in tubulin formation and the other could be involved in many functions. Further work will need to be done to confirm the correlation, and find the exact function of these α-subunits.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Degree Name:
B.S.
Degree Level:
Bachelors
Degree Program:
Honors College; Molecular & Cellular Biology
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Hackett, Jeremiah

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.titleGENE EXPRESSION AND AGGRESSIVE BEHAVIOR IN THE TOXIC ALGA PRYMNESIUM PARVUMen_US
dc.creatorCLARK, MEARA ANNen
dc.contributor.authorCLARK, MEARA ANNen
dc.date.issued2016-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en
dc.description.abstractThe toxic alga Prymnesium parvum lives in freshwater environments, and deprived of nutrients, it can cause harmful algal blooms. These blooms are responsible for substantial ecological and economic damage, and they are spreading into new water ways in the Western United States. All the individuals in a bloom do not behave the same, some are more aggressive than others. The genetics behind aggression is difficult to understand because the strains share a very similar genome content. Three loci were chosen for observation due to their differential expression between the strains, and possible relationship to toxicity. One is believed be involved directly with the toxin, and two are α-subunits for G-protein coupled receptors which are involved in signal transduction. The results show that one α-subunit is highly expressed in the aggressive strains and the other is being expressed in the passive strain. Both probably have an effect on the difference in phenotype. From a comparison of α-subunits that have similar structures it was concluded that one appeared to be involved in tubulin formation and the other could be involved in many functions. Further work will need to be done to confirm the correlation, and find the exact function of these α-subunits.en
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen
thesis.degree.nameB.S.en
thesis.degree.levelBachelorsen
thesis.degree.disciplineHonors Collegeen
thesis.degree.disciplineMolecular & Cellular Biologyen
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen
dc.contributor.advisorHackett, Jeremiahen
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