Transgenic Soybean Production of Bioactive Human Epidermal Growth Factor (EGF)

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/618518
Title:
Transgenic Soybean Production of Bioactive Human Epidermal Growth Factor (EGF)
Author:
He, Yonghua; Schmidt, Monica A.; Erwin, Christopher; Guo, Jun; Sun, Raphael; Pendarvis, Ken; Warner, Brad W.; Herman, Eliot M.
Affiliation:
School of Plant Sciences, University of Arizona; School of Animal & Comparative Biomedical Sciences, University of Arizona,
Issue Date:
2016-06-17
Publisher:
Public Library of Science
Citation:
Transgenic Soybean Production of Bioactive Human Epidermal Growth Factor (EGF) 2016, 11 (6):e0157034 PLOS ONE
Journal:
PLOS ONE
Rights:
Copyright: © 2016 He et al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License.
Collection Information:
This item from the UA Faculty Publications collection is made available by the University of Arizona with support from the University of Arizona Libraries. If you have questions, please contact us at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.
Abstract:
Necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) is a devastating condition of premature infants that results from the gut microbiome invading immature intestinal tissues. This results in a life-threatening disease that is frequently treated with the surgical removal of diseased and dead tissues. Epidermal growth factor (EGF), typically found in bodily fluids, such as amniotic fluid, salvia and mother’s breast milk, is an intestinotrophic growth factor and may reduce the onset of NEC in premature infants. We have produced human EGF in soybean seeds to levels biologically relevant and demonstrated its comparable activity to commercially available EGF. Transgenic soybean seeds expressing a seed-specific codon optimized gene encoding of the human EGF protein with an added ER signal tag at the N’ terminal were produced. Seven independent lines were grown to homozygous and found to accumulate a range of 6.7 +/- 3.1 to 129.0 +/- 36.7 μg EGF/g of dry soybean seed. Proteomic and immunoblot analysis indicates that the inserted EGF is the same as the human EGF protein. Phosphorylation and immunohistochemical assays on the EGF receptor in HeLa cells indicate the EGF protein produced in soybean seed is bioactive and comparable to commercially available human EGF. This work demonstrates the feasibility of using soybean seeds as a biofactory to produce therapeutic agents in a soymilk delivery platform.
Note:
Open access.
ISSN:
1932-6203
PubMed ID:
27314851
DOI:
10.1371/journal.pone.0157034; 10.6019/PXD003326
Version:
Final published version
Sponsors:
This research was supported by NIH# R21 DK094065 (BWW, PI; EMH and MAS coPIs), University Research Strategic Alliance Program; Washington University in St. Louis, and the Children’s Surgical Sciences Research Institute – St. Louis Children’s Hospital Foundation.
Additional Links:
http://dx.plos.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0157034; http://www.ebi.ac.uk/pride/archive/projects/PXD003326

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorHe, Yonghuaen
dc.contributor.authorSchmidt, Monica A.en
dc.contributor.authorErwin, Christopheren
dc.contributor.authorGuo, Junen
dc.contributor.authorSun, Raphaelen
dc.contributor.authorPendarvis, Kenen
dc.contributor.authorWarner, Brad W.en
dc.contributor.authorHerman, Eliot M.en
dc.date.accessioned2016-08-18T01:12:19Z-
dc.date.available2016-08-18T01:12:19Z-
dc.date.issued2016-06-17-
dc.identifier.citationTransgenic Soybean Production of Bioactive Human Epidermal Growth Factor (EGF) 2016, 11 (6):e0157034 PLOS ONEen
dc.identifier.issn1932-6203-
dc.identifier.pmid27314851-
dc.identifier.doi10.1371/journal.pone.0157034-
dc.identifier.doi10.6019/PXD003326-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/618518-
dc.description.abstractNecrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) is a devastating condition of premature infants that results from the gut microbiome invading immature intestinal tissues. This results in a life-threatening disease that is frequently treated with the surgical removal of diseased and dead tissues. Epidermal growth factor (EGF), typically found in bodily fluids, such as amniotic fluid, salvia and mother’s breast milk, is an intestinotrophic growth factor and may reduce the onset of NEC in premature infants. We have produced human EGF in soybean seeds to levels biologically relevant and demonstrated its comparable activity to commercially available EGF. Transgenic soybean seeds expressing a seed-specific codon optimized gene encoding of the human EGF protein with an added ER signal tag at the N’ terminal were produced. Seven independent lines were grown to homozygous and found to accumulate a range of 6.7 +/- 3.1 to 129.0 +/- 36.7 μg EGF/g of dry soybean seed. Proteomic and immunoblot analysis indicates that the inserted EGF is the same as the human EGF protein. Phosphorylation and immunohistochemical assays on the EGF receptor in HeLa cells indicate the EGF protein produced in soybean seed is bioactive and comparable to commercially available human EGF. This work demonstrates the feasibility of using soybean seeds as a biofactory to produce therapeutic agents in a soymilk delivery platform.en
dc.description.sponsorshipThis research was supported by NIH# R21 DK094065 (BWW, PI; EMH and MAS coPIs), University Research Strategic Alliance Program; Washington University in St. Louis, and the Children’s Surgical Sciences Research Institute – St. Louis Children’s Hospital Foundation.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherPublic Library of Scienceen
dc.relation.urlhttp://dx.plos.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0157034en
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.ebi.ac.uk/pride/archive/projects/PXD003326-
dc.rightsCopyright: © 2016 He et al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License.en
dc.titleTransgenic Soybean Production of Bioactive Human Epidermal Growth Factor (EGF)en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentSchool of Plant Sciences, University of Arizonaen
dc.contributor.departmentSchool of Animal & Comparative Biomedical Sciences, University of Arizona,en
dc.identifier.journalPLOS ONEen
dc.description.noteOpen access.en
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item from the UA Faculty Publications collection is made available by the University of Arizona with support from the University of Arizona Libraries. If you have questions, please contact us at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.en
dc.eprint.versionFinal published versionen

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