MATHEMATICAL SYSTEM THEORY AND THE ECOSYSTEM CONCEPT, AN APPROACH TO MODELLING WATERSHED BEHAVIOR

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/617633
Title:
MATHEMATICAL SYSTEM THEORY AND THE ECOSYSTEM CONCEPT, AN APPROACH TO MODELLING WATERSHED BEHAVIOR
Author:
Rogers, James Joseph
Affiliation:
Department of Hydrology & Water Resources, The University of Arizona
Publisher:
Department of Hydrology and Water Resources, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ)
Issue Date:
1971-06
Rights:
Copyright © Arizona Board of Regents
Collection Information:
This title from the Hydrology & Water Resources Technical Reports collection is made available by the Department of Hydrology & Atmospheric Sciences and the University Libraries, University of Arizona. If you have questions about titles in this collection, please contact repository@u.library.arizona.edu.
Abstract:
This study explores the possible role of mathematical system theory in integrating existing ecological knowledge within the existing concepts of the structure of the biosphere. The objective of this integration is a theory of ecosystems which must include interactions. The basic unit of the biosphere is the biogeocoenose; similar to the ecosystem, but homogeneous with respect to topographic, microclimatic, vegetation, animal, pedalogical, hydrological and geochemical conditions. The role of the biogeocoenose in a theory of ecosystems based on system theory is discussed. The biogeocoenose may serve as the building block for modeling watersheds as ecosystems. The fundamentals of system theory are reviewed. As an example, an analysis and synthesis of the arid zone water balance follows. The water balance is resolved into twenty components which represent the water balance of (1) the canopy, (2) the mulch, (3) the soil surface, (4) the soil, and (5) the plant, including interactions. The twenty components were modeled as separate systems which were later coupled into one overall, complex, well defined ecosystem water balance system. The example illustrates the role of system theory in integrating ecological knowledge. Further discussion indicates the need for explicitly including plant behavior in the water balance model.
Keywords:
Ecology -- Mathematical models.; Biomathematics; Water resources development -- United States.; Watershed management -- Mathematical models.
Series/Report no.:
Technical Reports on Hydrology and Water Resources, No. 03
Sponsors:
I wish to acknowledge the guidance of Dr. Hasan K. Qashu, whose discussions helped greatly in determining my objectives, Dr. Chester C. Kisiel for providing valuable reference material, Dr. D. D. Evans for providing financial support when needed, and Dr. A. Wayne Wymore, whose stimulating lectures provided the framework for the entire thesis. I also wish to acknowledge the support of an NDEA Title IV Fellowship while on extended leave without pay from the United States Forest Service. Finally, I wish to thank my wife, Alviria, for providing encouragement and Faith and Michelle for providing frequent interruptions.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorRogers, James Josephen
dc.date.accessioned2016-07-27T23:16:26Z-
dc.date.available2016-07-27T23:16:26Z-
dc.date.issued1971-06-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/617633-
dc.description.abstractThis study explores the possible role of mathematical system theory in integrating existing ecological knowledge within the existing concepts of the structure of the biosphere. The objective of this integration is a theory of ecosystems which must include interactions. The basic unit of the biosphere is the biogeocoenose; similar to the ecosystem, but homogeneous with respect to topographic, microclimatic, vegetation, animal, pedalogical, hydrological and geochemical conditions. The role of the biogeocoenose in a theory of ecosystems based on system theory is discussed. The biogeocoenose may serve as the building block for modeling watersheds as ecosystems. The fundamentals of system theory are reviewed. As an example, an analysis and synthesis of the arid zone water balance follows. The water balance is resolved into twenty components which represent the water balance of (1) the canopy, (2) the mulch, (3) the soil surface, (4) the soil, and (5) the plant, including interactions. The twenty components were modeled as separate systems which were later coupled into one overall, complex, well defined ecosystem water balance system. The example illustrates the role of system theory in integrating ecological knowledge. Further discussion indicates the need for explicitly including plant behavior in the water balance model.en
dc.description.sponsorshipI wish to acknowledge the guidance of Dr. Hasan K. Qashu, whose discussions helped greatly in determining my objectives, Dr. Chester C. Kisiel for providing valuable reference material, Dr. D. D. Evans for providing financial support when needed, and Dr. A. Wayne Wymore, whose stimulating lectures provided the framework for the entire thesis. I also wish to acknowledge the support of an NDEA Title IV Fellowship while on extended leave without pay from the United States Forest Service. Finally, I wish to thank my wife, Alviria, for providing encouragement and Faith and Michelle for providing frequent interruptions.en
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherDepartment of Hydrology and Water Resources, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ)en
dc.relation.ispartofseriesTechnical Reports on Hydrology and Water Resources, No. 03en
dc.rightsCopyright © Arizona Board of Regentsen
dc.sourceProvided by the Department of Hydrology and Water Resources.en
dc.subjectEcology -- Mathematical models.en
dc.subjectBiomathematicsen
dc.subjectWater resources development -- United States.en
dc.subjectWatershed management -- Mathematical models.en
dc.titleMATHEMATICAL SYSTEM THEORY AND THE ECOSYSTEM CONCEPT, AN APPROACH TO MODELLING WATERSHED BEHAVIORen_US
dc.typetexten
dc.typeTechnical Reporten
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Hydrology & Water Resources, The University of Arizonaen
dc.description.collectioninformationThis title from the Hydrology & Water Resources Technical Reports collection is made available by the Department of Hydrology & Atmospheric Sciences and the University Libraries, University of Arizona. If you have questions about titles in this collection, please contact repository@u.library.arizona.edu.en
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