COLLECTIVE UTILITY IN THE MANAGEMENT OF NATURAL RESOURCES: A SYSTEMS APPROACH

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/617604
Title:
COLLECTIVE UTILITY IN THE MANAGEMENT OF NATURAL RESOURCES: A SYSTEMS APPROACH
Author:
Dupnick, Edwin Gene
Affiliation:
Department of Hydrology & Water Resources, The University of Arizona
Publisher:
Department of Hydrology and Water Resources, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ)
Issue Date:
1971-06
Rights:
Copyright © Arizona Board of Regents
Collection Information:
This title from the Hydrology & Water Resources Technical Reports collection is made available by the Department of Hydrology & Atmospheric Sciences and the University Libraries, University of Arizona. If you have questions about titles in this collection, please contact repository@u.library.arizona.edu.
Abstract:
The main purpose of this report is to develop an economic theory, along the lines of the Bergson- Samuelson social welfare theory, to regulate the utilization of natural resources in the long -term interest of a political- economic group of individuals and firms. The theory, called Collective Utility, qualifies as a "systems approach" because of its inherent flexibility, generality, and comprehensiveness. Collective Utility is a function of individual satisfactions and firm revenues, which are, in general, contingent upon the actions of other individuals and /or firms. Such interactions are called externalities. It is the contention of this report that efficient management of natural resources will follow from efficient control of externalities. A taxation - subsidy structure is suggested as an efficient control and the complete mathematics of determining and implementing such a structure are provided. Finally, the idea of externalities is integrated within the framework of Collective Utility to form an optimal policy for the utilization of natural resources using the techniques of calculus of variations.
Keywords:
Natural Resources
Series/Report no.:
Technical Reports on Hydrology and Water Resources, No. 05

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorDupnick, Edwin Geneen
dc.date.accessioned2016-07-26T19:58:15Z-
dc.date.available2016-07-26T19:58:15Z-
dc.date.issued1971-06-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/617604-
dc.description.abstractThe main purpose of this report is to develop an economic theory, along the lines of the Bergson- Samuelson social welfare theory, to regulate the utilization of natural resources in the long -term interest of a political- economic group of individuals and firms. The theory, called Collective Utility, qualifies as a "systems approach" because of its inherent flexibility, generality, and comprehensiveness. Collective Utility is a function of individual satisfactions and firm revenues, which are, in general, contingent upon the actions of other individuals and /or firms. Such interactions are called externalities. It is the contention of this report that efficient management of natural resources will follow from efficient control of externalities. A taxation - subsidy structure is suggested as an efficient control and the complete mathematics of determining and implementing such a structure are provided. Finally, the idea of externalities is integrated within the framework of Collective Utility to form an optimal policy for the utilization of natural resources using the techniques of calculus of variations.en
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherDepartment of Hydrology and Water Resources, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ)en
dc.relation.ispartofseriesTechnical Reports on Hydrology and Water Resources, No. 05en
dc.rightsCopyright © Arizona Board of Regentsen
dc.sourceProvided by the Department of Hydrology and Water Resources.en
dc.subjectNatural Resourcesen
dc.titleCOLLECTIVE UTILITY IN THE MANAGEMENT OF NATURAL RESOURCES: A SYSTEMS APPROACHen_US
dc.typetexten
dc.typeTechnical Reporten
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Hydrology & Water Resources, The University of Arizonaen
dc.description.collectioninformationThis title from the Hydrology & Water Resources Technical Reports collection is made available by the Department of Hydrology & Atmospheric Sciences and the University Libraries, University of Arizona. If you have questions about titles in this collection, please contact repository@u.library.arizona.edu.en
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