COLORADO RIVER TRIPS WITHIN THE GRAND CANYON NATIONAL PARK AND MONUMENT: A SOCIO-ECONOMIC ANALYSIS

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/617590
Title:
COLORADO RIVER TRIPS WITHIN THE GRAND CANYON NATIONAL PARK AND MONUMENT: A SOCIO-ECONOMIC ANALYSIS
Author:
Boster, Mark Alan
Affiliation:
Department of Hydrology & Water Resources, The University of Arizona
Publisher:
Department of Hydrology and Water Resources, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ)
Issue Date:
1972-06
Rights:
Copyright © Arizona Board of Regents
Collection Information:
This title from the Hydrology & Water Resources Technical Reports collection is made available by the Department of Hydrology & Atmospheric Sciences and the University Libraries, University of Arizona. If you have questions about titles in this collection, please contact repository@u.library.arizona.edu.
Abstract:
The recreational use of the Colorado River within the Grand Canyon National Park and National Monument increased on the order of 60 to 70 per cent during each year of the interval 1967 to 1970. Consequently, the U. S. National Park Service instituted user limits to protect and preserve the area commencing with the 1971 season. This limit was established with limited data on the users of the river or about their perceptions of the trip experience. A need existed to collect and analyze this type of data, and to suggest possible management alternatives. This study used a mailed questionnaire to a random sample of past participants in order to collect basic socio-economic data. The analysis was based on a 65% response rate, and consisted of individual question tabulation and multivariate data -cluster analysis. The data show background characteristics of the participants, reasons for taking the trip, reactions to the experience, perceptions of problems associated with the trips, reactions to crowded conditions, and needs for regulatory policy concerning user intensities.
Keywords:
Rivers -- Recreational use; Colorado River (Colo.-Mexico) -- Navigation.; Grand Canyon National Park (Ariz.)
Series/Report no.:
Technical Reports on Hydrology and Water Resources, No. 10
Sponsors:
This research was supported by a grant from the Grand Canyon Natural History Association. The author wishes to express his sincere thanks to Professor Russell L. Gum, Department of Hydrology and Water Resources, for his professional guidance and thoughtful criticisms during the preparation of this thesis. Special thanks go to Professor D. D. Evans, Head of the Department of Hydrology and Water Resources, who served as chairman of the author's graduate committee, and to Professor David King, Department of Watershed Management, who was a member of the author's committee and whose comments about the thesis were very helpful. David Monarchi, a Research Specialist in the Division of Economic and Business Research, provided invaluable assistance with Cluster Analysis. Several other persons have given valuable assistance and advice concerning this work. David Ochsner and Warren Hill of the U. S. National Park Service worked closely with the author throughout the project and contributed much technical advice. William Diamond and Robert Elliott represented the Colorado River Outfitters Association during the early stages of the research. Sanderson Brothers River Expeditions enabled the author to develop a better understanding of river trips by permitting him to accompany one of their groups. The writer wishes to express his appreciation to the National Science Foundation for an appointment as a Trainee in Water Resources Administration. Finally, the author would like to express his gratitude to The University of Arizona Computer Center for the use of their facilities.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorBoster, Mark Alanen
dc.date.accessioned2016-07-26T19:55:30Z-
dc.date.available2016-07-26T19:55:30Z-
dc.date.issued1972-06-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/617590-
dc.description.abstractThe recreational use of the Colorado River within the Grand Canyon National Park and National Monument increased on the order of 60 to 70 per cent during each year of the interval 1967 to 1970. Consequently, the U. S. National Park Service instituted user limits to protect and preserve the area commencing with the 1971 season. This limit was established with limited data on the users of the river or about their perceptions of the trip experience. A need existed to collect and analyze this type of data, and to suggest possible management alternatives. This study used a mailed questionnaire to a random sample of past participants in order to collect basic socio-economic data. The analysis was based on a 65% response rate, and consisted of individual question tabulation and multivariate data -cluster analysis. The data show background characteristics of the participants, reasons for taking the trip, reactions to the experience, perceptions of problems associated with the trips, reactions to crowded conditions, and needs for regulatory policy concerning user intensities.en
dc.description.sponsorshipThis research was supported by a grant from the Grand Canyon Natural History Association. The author wishes to express his sincere thanks to Professor Russell L. Gum, Department of Hydrology and Water Resources, for his professional guidance and thoughtful criticisms during the preparation of this thesis. Special thanks go to Professor D. D. Evans, Head of the Department of Hydrology and Water Resources, who served as chairman of the author's graduate committee, and to Professor David King, Department of Watershed Management, who was a member of the author's committee and whose comments about the thesis were very helpful. David Monarchi, a Research Specialist in the Division of Economic and Business Research, provided invaluable assistance with Cluster Analysis. Several other persons have given valuable assistance and advice concerning this work. David Ochsner and Warren Hill of the U. S. National Park Service worked closely with the author throughout the project and contributed much technical advice. William Diamond and Robert Elliott represented the Colorado River Outfitters Association during the early stages of the research. Sanderson Brothers River Expeditions enabled the author to develop a better understanding of river trips by permitting him to accompany one of their groups. The writer wishes to express his appreciation to the National Science Foundation for an appointment as a Trainee in Water Resources Administration. Finally, the author would like to express his gratitude to The University of Arizona Computer Center for the use of their facilities.en
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherDepartment of Hydrology and Water Resources, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ)en
dc.relation.ispartofseriesTechnical Reports on Hydrology and Water Resources, No. 10en
dc.rightsCopyright © Arizona Board of Regentsen
dc.sourceProvided by the Department of Hydrology and Water Resources.en
dc.subjectRivers -- Recreational useen
dc.subjectColorado River (Colo.-Mexico) -- Navigation.en
dc.subjectGrand Canyon National Park (Ariz.)en
dc.titleCOLORADO RIVER TRIPS WITHIN THE GRAND CANYON NATIONAL PARK AND MONUMENT: A SOCIO-ECONOMIC ANALYSISen_US
dc.typetexten
dc.typeTechnical Reporten
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Hydrology & Water Resources, The University of Arizonaen
dc.description.collectioninformationThis title from the Hydrology & Water Resources Technical Reports collection is made available by the Department of Hydrology & Atmospheric Sciences and the University Libraries, University of Arizona. If you have questions about titles in this collection, please contact repository@u.library.arizona.edu.en
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