Influence of climate variability on water partitioning and effective energy and mass transfer in a semi-arid critical zone

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/617370
Title:
Influence of climate variability on water partitioning and effective energy and mass transfer in a semi-arid critical zone
Author:
Zapata-Rios, Xavier; Brooks, Paul D.; Troch, Peter A.; McIntosh, Jennifer; Rasmussen, Craig
Affiliation:
Univ Arizona, Dept Hydrol & Water Resources; Univ Arizona, Soil Water & Environm Sci
Issue Date:
2016-03-15
Publisher:
COPERNICUS GESELLSCHAFT MBH
Citation:
Influence of climate variability on water partitioning and effective energy and mass transfer in a semi-arid critical zone 2016, 20 (3):1103 Hydrology and Earth System Sciences
Journal:
Hydrology and Earth System Sciences
Rights:
© Author(s) 2016. CC Attribution 3.0 License.
Collection Information:
This item from the UA Faculty Publications collection is made available by the University of Arizona with support from the University of Arizona Libraries. If you have questions, please contact us at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.
Abstract:
The critical zone (CZ) is the heterogeneous, near-surface layer of the planet that regulates life-sustaining resources. Previous research has demonstrated that a quantification of the influxes of effective energy and mass transfer (EEMT) to the CZ can predict its structure and function. In this study, we quantify how climate variability in the last 3 decades (1984–2012) has affected water availability and the temporal trends in EEMT. This study takes place in the 1200 km<sup>2</sup> upper Jemez River basin in northern New Mexico. The analysis of climate, water availability, and EEMT was based on records from two high-elevation SNOTEL stations, PRISM data, catchment-scale discharge, and satellite-derived net primary productivity (MODIS). Results from this study indicated a decreasing trend in water availability, a reduction in forest productivity (4 g C m<sup>−2</sup> per 10 mm of reduction in precipitation), and decreasing EEMT (1.2–1.3 MJ m<sup>2</sup> decade<sup>−1</sup>). Although we do not know the timescales of CZ change, these results suggest an upward migration of CZ/ecosystem structure on the order of 100 m decade<sup>−1</sup>, and that decadal-scale differences in EEMT are similar to the differences between convergent/hydrologically subsidized and planar/divergent landscapes, which have been shown to be very different in vegetation and CZ structure.
ISSN:
1607-7938
DOI:
10.5194/hess-20-1103-2016
Version:
Final published version
Sponsors:
NSF [EAR-0724958, EAR-1331408]
Additional Links:
http://www.hydrol-earth-syst-sci.net/20/1103/2016/

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorZapata-Rios, Xavieren
dc.contributor.authorBrooks, Paul D.en
dc.contributor.authorTroch, Peter A.en
dc.contributor.authorMcIntosh, Jenniferen
dc.contributor.authorRasmussen, Craigen
dc.date.accessioned2016-07-23T00:05:26Z-
dc.date.available2016-07-23T00:05:26Z-
dc.date.issued2016-03-15-
dc.identifier.citationInfluence of climate variability on water partitioning and effective energy and mass transfer in a semi-arid critical zone 2016, 20 (3):1103 Hydrology and Earth System Sciencesen
dc.identifier.issn1607-7938-
dc.identifier.doi10.5194/hess-20-1103-2016-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/617370-
dc.description.abstractThe critical zone (CZ) is the heterogeneous, near-surface layer of the planet that regulates life-sustaining resources. Previous research has demonstrated that a quantification of the influxes of effective energy and mass transfer (EEMT) to the CZ can predict its structure and function. In this study, we quantify how climate variability in the last 3 decades (1984–2012) has affected water availability and the temporal trends in EEMT. This study takes place in the 1200 km<sup>2</sup> upper Jemez River basin in northern New Mexico. The analysis of climate, water availability, and EEMT was based on records from two high-elevation SNOTEL stations, PRISM data, catchment-scale discharge, and satellite-derived net primary productivity (MODIS). Results from this study indicated a decreasing trend in water availability, a reduction in forest productivity (4 g C m<sup>−2</sup> per 10 mm of reduction in precipitation), and decreasing EEMT (1.2–1.3 MJ m<sup>2</sup> decade<sup>−1</sup>). Although we do not know the timescales of CZ change, these results suggest an upward migration of CZ/ecosystem structure on the order of 100 m decade<sup>−1</sup>, and that decadal-scale differences in EEMT are similar to the differences between convergent/hydrologically subsidized and planar/divergent landscapes, which have been shown to be very different in vegetation and CZ structure.en
dc.description.sponsorshipNSF [EAR-0724958, EAR-1331408]en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherCOPERNICUS GESELLSCHAFT MBHen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.hydrol-earth-syst-sci.net/20/1103/2016/en
dc.rights© Author(s) 2016. CC Attribution 3.0 License.en
dc.titleInfluence of climate variability on water partitioning and effective energy and mass transfer in a semi-arid critical zoneen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniv Arizona, Dept Hydrol & Water Resourcesen
dc.contributor.departmentUniv Arizona, Soil Water & Environm Scien
dc.identifier.journalHydrology and Earth System Sciencesen
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item from the UA Faculty Publications collection is made available by the University of Arizona with support from the University of Arizona Libraries. If you have questions, please contact us at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.en
dc.eprint.versionFinal published versionen
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