Women’s Health Leadership Training to Enhance Community Health Workers as Change Agents

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/617227
Title:
Women’s Health Leadership Training to Enhance Community Health Workers as Change Agents
Author:
Ingram, Maia; Chang, Jean; Kunz, Susan; Piper, Rosie; Zapien, Jill Guernsey de; Strawder, Kay
Affiliation:
University of Arizona; Mariposa Community Health Center; U.S. Office of Women's Health
Issue Date:
2016-05
Publisher:
SAGE PUBLICATIONS INC
Citation:
Ingram M, Chang J, Kunz S, Piper S, Strawder K. Evaluating Women’s Health Leadership Training in Enhancing Community Health Workers as Change Agents. Health Promotion Practice. 2016;17(3):391-399.
Journal:
Health Promotion Practice
Rights:
© 2016 Society for Public Health Education
Collection Information:
This item from the UA Faculty Publications collection is made available by the University of Arizona with support from the University of Arizona Libraries. If you have questions, please contact us at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.
Abstract:
Objectives. A community health worker (CHW) is a frontline public health worker who is a trusted member of and/or has an unusually close understanding of the community served. While natural leadership may incline individuals to the CHW profession, they do not always have skills to address broad social issues. We describe evaluation of the Women’s Health Leadership Institute (WHLI), a 3-year training initiative to increase the capacity of CHWs as change agents. Methods. Pre-/postquestionnaires measured the confidence of 254 participants in mastering WHLI leadership competencies. In-depth interviews with CHW participants 6 to 9 months after the training documented application of WHLI competencies in the community. A national CHW survey measured the extent to which WHLI graduates used leadership skills that resulted in concrete changes to benefit community members. Multivariate logistic regressions controlling for covariates compared WHLI graduates’ leadership skills to the national sample. Results. Participants reported statistically significant pre-/post improvements in all competencies. nterviewees credited WHLI with increasing their capacity to listen to others, create partnerships, and initiate efforts to address community needs. Compared to a national CHW sample, WHLI participants were more likely to engage community members in attending public meetings and organizing events. These activities led to community members taking action on an issue and a concrete policy change. Conclusions. Leadership training can increase the ability of experienced CHWs to address underlying issues related to community health across different types of organizational affiliations and job responsibilities.
Note:
Sage policy: Once the article has been accepted for publication, you may post the accepted version (version 2) of the article on your own personal website, your department’s website or the repository of your institution without any restrictions.
DOI:
10.1177/1524839916637047
Keywords:
Community Health Workers; Leadership; Training; Evaluation
Version:
Final accepted manuscript
Sponsors:
DHHS Office Of Women's Health
Additional Links:
http://hpp.sagepub.com/content/17/3/391.full.pdf+html

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorIngram, Maiaen
dc.contributor.authorChang, Jeanen
dc.contributor.authorKunz, Susanen
dc.contributor.authorPiper, Rosieen
dc.contributor.authorZapien, Jill Guernsey deen
dc.contributor.authorStrawder, Kayen
dc.date.accessioned2016-07-19T21:29:01Z-
dc.date.available2016-07-19T21:29:01Z-
dc.date.issued2016-05-
dc.identifier.citationIngram M, Chang J, Kunz S, Piper S, Strawder K. Evaluating Women’s Health Leadership Training in Enhancing Community Health Workers as Change Agents. Health Promotion Practice. 2016;17(3):391-399.en
dc.identifier.doi10.1177/1524839916637047-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/617227-
dc.description.abstractObjectives. A community health worker (CHW) is a frontline public health worker who is a trusted member of and/or has an unusually close understanding of the community served. While natural leadership may incline individuals to the CHW profession, they do not always have skills to address broad social issues. We describe evaluation of the Women’s Health Leadership Institute (WHLI), a 3-year training initiative to increase the capacity of CHWs as change agents. Methods. Pre-/postquestionnaires measured the confidence of 254 participants in mastering WHLI leadership competencies. In-depth interviews with CHW participants 6 to 9 months after the training documented application of WHLI competencies in the community. A national CHW survey measured the extent to which WHLI graduates used leadership skills that resulted in concrete changes to benefit community members. Multivariate logistic regressions controlling for covariates compared WHLI graduates’ leadership skills to the national sample. Results. Participants reported statistically significant pre-/post improvements in all competencies. nterviewees credited WHLI with increasing their capacity to listen to others, create partnerships, and initiate efforts to address community needs. Compared to a national CHW sample, WHLI participants were more likely to engage community members in attending public meetings and organizing events. These activities led to community members taking action on an issue and a concrete policy change. Conclusions. Leadership training can increase the ability of experienced CHWs to address underlying issues related to community health across different types of organizational affiliations and job responsibilities.en
dc.description.sponsorshipDHHS Office Of Women's Healthen
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherSAGE PUBLICATIONS INCen
dc.relation.urlhttp://hpp.sagepub.com/content/17/3/391.full.pdf+htmlen
dc.rights© 2016 Society for Public Health Educationen
dc.subjectCommunity Health Workersen
dc.subjectLeadershipen
dc.subjectTrainingen
dc.subjectEvaluationen
dc.subject.meshAnimals-
dc.subject.meshChromatography, Thin Layer-
dc.subject.meshDigitoxigenin-
dc.subject.meshDigitoxin-
dc.subject.meshHydroxylation-
dc.subject.meshIn Vitro Techniques-
dc.subject.meshMale-
dc.subject.meshMicrosomes, Liver-
dc.subject.meshNADP-
dc.subject.meshRats-
dc.subject.meshTime Factors-
dc.subject.meshAnimals-
dc.subject.meshCarbohydrate Metabolism-
dc.subject.meshDigestive System-
dc.subject.meshFatty Acids-
dc.subject.meshFemale-
dc.subject.meshMale-
dc.subject.meshOrgan Specificity-
dc.subject.meshOvary-
dc.subject.meshPeriodicity-
dc.subject.meshReproduction-
dc.subject.meshStarfish-
dc.subject.meshTestis-
dc.subject.meshTime Factors-
dc.titleWomen’s Health Leadership Training to Enhance Community Health Workers as Change Agentsen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Arizonaen
dc.contributor.departmentMariposa Community Health Centeren
dc.contributor.departmentU.S. Office of Women's Healthen
dc.identifier.journalHealth Promotion Practiceen
dc.description.noteSage policy: Once the article has been accepted for publication, you may post the accepted version (version 2) of the article on your own personal website, your department’s website or the repository of your institution without any restrictions.en
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item from the UA Faculty Publications collection is made available by the University of Arizona with support from the University of Arizona Libraries. If you have questions, please contact us at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.en
dc.eprint.versionFinal accepted manuscripten
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