Western Pacific hydroclimate linked to global climate variability over the past two millennia

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/617210
Title:
Western Pacific hydroclimate linked to global climate variability over the past two millennia
Author:
Griffiths, Michael L.; Kimbrough, Alena K.; Gagan, Michael K.; Drysdale, Russell N.; Cole, Julia E.; Johnson, Kathleen R.; Zhao, Jian-Xin; Cook, Benjamin I.; Hellstrom, John C. ( 0000-0001-9427-3525 ) ; Hantoro, Wahyoe S.
Affiliation:
Univ Arizona, Dept Geosci; Univ Arizona, Dept Atmospher Sci
Issue Date:
2016-06-08
Publisher:
NATURE PUBLISHING GROUP
Citation:
Western Pacific hydroclimate linked to global climate variability over the past two millennia 2016, 7:11719 Nature Communications
Journal:
Nature Communications
Rights:
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License
Collection Information:
This item from the UA Faculty Publications collection is made available by the University of Arizona with support from the University of Arizona Libraries. If you have questions, please contact us at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.
Abstract:
Interdecadal modes of tropical Pacific ocean-atmosphere circulation have a strong influence on global temperature, yet the extent to which these phenomena influence global climate on multicentury timescales is still poorly known. Here we present a 2,000-year, multiproxy reconstruction of western Pacific hydroclimate from two speleothem records for southeastern Indonesia. The composite record shows pronounced shifts in monsoon rainfall that are antiphased with precipitation records for East Asia and the central-eastern equatorial Pacific. These meridional and zonal patterns are best explained by a poleward expansion of the Australasian Intertropical Convergence Zone and weakening of the Pacific Walker circulation (PWC) between similar to 1000 and 1500 CE Conversely, an equatorward contraction of the Intertropical Convergence Zone and strengthened PWC occurred between similar to 1500 and 1900 CE. Our findings, together with climate model simulations, highlight the likelihood that century-scale variations in tropical Pacific climate modes can significantly modulate radiatively forced shifts in global temperature.
ISSN:
2041-1723
DOI:
10.1038/ncomms11719
Version:
Final published version
Sponsors:
Australian Research Council Discovery [DP0663274, DP1095673]; NOAA/UCAR Climate and Global Change Postdoctoral Fellowship; William Paterson University; Lewis and Clark College Mellon Research Initiative Fellowship; US NSF
Additional Links:
http://www.nature.com/doifinder/10.1038/ncomms11719

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorGriffiths, Michael L.en
dc.contributor.authorKimbrough, Alena K.en
dc.contributor.authorGagan, Michael K.en
dc.contributor.authorDrysdale, Russell N.en
dc.contributor.authorCole, Julia E.en
dc.contributor.authorJohnson, Kathleen R.en
dc.contributor.authorZhao, Jian-Xinen
dc.contributor.authorCook, Benjamin I.en
dc.contributor.authorHellstrom, John C.en
dc.contributor.authorHantoro, Wahyoe S.en
dc.date.accessioned2016-07-19T02:23:08Z-
dc.date.available2016-07-19T02:23:08Z-
dc.date.issued2016-06-08-
dc.identifier.citationWestern Pacific hydroclimate linked to global climate variability over the past two millennia 2016, 7:11719 Nature Communicationsen
dc.identifier.issn2041-1723-
dc.identifier.doi10.1038/ncomms11719-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/617210-
dc.description.abstractInterdecadal modes of tropical Pacific ocean-atmosphere circulation have a strong influence on global temperature, yet the extent to which these phenomena influence global climate on multicentury timescales is still poorly known. Here we present a 2,000-year, multiproxy reconstruction of western Pacific hydroclimate from two speleothem records for southeastern Indonesia. The composite record shows pronounced shifts in monsoon rainfall that are antiphased with precipitation records for East Asia and the central-eastern equatorial Pacific. These meridional and zonal patterns are best explained by a poleward expansion of the Australasian Intertropical Convergence Zone and weakening of the Pacific Walker circulation (PWC) between similar to 1000 and 1500 CE Conversely, an equatorward contraction of the Intertropical Convergence Zone and strengthened PWC occurred between similar to 1500 and 1900 CE. Our findings, together with climate model simulations, highlight the likelihood that century-scale variations in tropical Pacific climate modes can significantly modulate radiatively forced shifts in global temperature.en
dc.description.sponsorshipAustralian Research Council Discovery [DP0663274, DP1095673]; NOAA/UCAR Climate and Global Change Postdoctoral Fellowship; William Paterson University; Lewis and Clark College Mellon Research Initiative Fellowship; US NSFen
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherNATURE PUBLISHING GROUPen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.nature.com/doifinder/10.1038/ncomms11719en
dc.rightsThis work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International Licenseen
dc.titleWestern Pacific hydroclimate linked to global climate variability over the past two millenniaen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniv Arizona, Dept Geoscien
dc.contributor.departmentUniv Arizona, Dept Atmospher Scien
dc.identifier.journalNature Communicationsen
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item from the UA Faculty Publications collection is made available by the University of Arizona with support from the University of Arizona Libraries. If you have questions, please contact us at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.en
dc.eprint.versionFinal published versionen
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