Anthropogenic impacts drive niche and conservation metrics of a cryptic rattlesnake on the Colorado Plateau of western North America

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/617208
Title:
Anthropogenic impacts drive niche and conservation metrics of a cryptic rattlesnake on the Colorado Plateau of western North America
Author:
Douglas, M. R.; Davis, M. A.; Amarello, M.; Smith, J. J.; Schuett, G. W.; Herrmann, H.-W.; Holycross, A. T.; Douglas, M. E.
Affiliation:
Univ Arizona, Nat Resources & Environm
Issue Date:
2016-04-27
Publisher:
ROYAL SOC
Citation:
Anthropogenic impacts drive niche and conservation metrics of a cryptic rattlesnake on the Colorado Plateau of western North America 2016, 3 (4):160047 Royal Society Open Science
Journal:
Royal Society Open Science
Rights:
© 2016 The Authors. Published by the Royal Society under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/, which permits unrestricted use, provided the original author and source are credited.
Collection Information:
This item from the UA Faculty Publications collection is made available by the University of Arizona with support from the University of Arizona Libraries. If you have questions, please contact us at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.
Abstract:
Ecosystems transition quickly in the Anthropocene, whereas biodiversity adapts more slowly. Here we simulated a shifting woodland ecosystem on the Colorado Plateau of western North America by using as its proxy over space and time the fundamental niche of the Arizona black rattlesnake (Crotalus cerberus). We found an expansive (= end-of-Pleistocene) range that contracted sharply (= present), but is blocked topographically by Grand Canyon/Colorado River as it shifts predictably northwestward under moderate climate change (= 2080). Vulnerability to contemporary wildfire was quantified from available records, with forested area reduced more than 27% over 13 years. Both 'ecosystem metrics' underscore how climate and wildfire are rapidly converting the Plateau ecosystem into novel habitat. To gauge potential effects on C. cerberus, we derived a series of relevant 'conservation metrics' (i.e. genetic variability, dispersal capacity, effective population size) by sequencing 118 individuals across 846 bp of mitochondrial (mt)DNA-ATPase8/6. We identified five significantly different clades (net sequence divergence = 2.2%) isolated by drainage/topography, with low dispersal (F-ST = 0.82) and small sizes (2N(ef) = 5.2). Our compiled metrics (i.e. small-populations, topographic-isolation, low-dispersal versus conserved-niche, vulnerable-ecosystem, dispersal barriers) underscore the susceptibility of this woodland specialist to a climate and wildfire tandem. We offer adaptive management scenarios that may counterbalance these metrics and avoid the extirpation of this and other highly specialized, relictual woodland clades.
Note:
Open access.
ISSN:
2054-5703
DOI:
10.1098/rsos.160047
Keywords:
climate change; Crotalus cerberus; drainage vicariance; environmental niche modelling; wildfire
Version:
Final published version
Additional Links:
http://rsos.royalsocietypublishing.org/lookup/doi/10.1098/rsos.160047

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorDouglas, M. R.en
dc.contributor.authorDavis, M. A.en
dc.contributor.authorAmarello, M.en
dc.contributor.authorSmith, J. J.en
dc.contributor.authorSchuett, G. W.en
dc.contributor.authorHerrmann, H.-W.en
dc.contributor.authorHolycross, A. T.en
dc.contributor.authorDouglas, M. E.en
dc.date.accessioned2016-07-19T02:12:19Z-
dc.date.available2016-07-19T02:12:19Z-
dc.date.issued2016-04-27-
dc.identifier.citationAnthropogenic impacts drive niche and conservation metrics of a cryptic rattlesnake on the Colorado Plateau of western North America 2016, 3 (4):160047 Royal Society Open Scienceen
dc.identifier.issn2054-5703-
dc.identifier.doi10.1098/rsos.160047-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/617208-
dc.description.abstractEcosystems transition quickly in the Anthropocene, whereas biodiversity adapts more slowly. Here we simulated a shifting woodland ecosystem on the Colorado Plateau of western North America by using as its proxy over space and time the fundamental niche of the Arizona black rattlesnake (Crotalus cerberus). We found an expansive (= end-of-Pleistocene) range that contracted sharply (= present), but is blocked topographically by Grand Canyon/Colorado River as it shifts predictably northwestward under moderate climate change (= 2080). Vulnerability to contemporary wildfire was quantified from available records, with forested area reduced more than 27% over 13 years. Both 'ecosystem metrics' underscore how climate and wildfire are rapidly converting the Plateau ecosystem into novel habitat. To gauge potential effects on C. cerberus, we derived a series of relevant 'conservation metrics' (i.e. genetic variability, dispersal capacity, effective population size) by sequencing 118 individuals across 846 bp of mitochondrial (mt)DNA-ATPase8/6. We identified five significantly different clades (net sequence divergence = 2.2%) isolated by drainage/topography, with low dispersal (F-ST = 0.82) and small sizes (2N(ef) = 5.2). Our compiled metrics (i.e. small-populations, topographic-isolation, low-dispersal versus conserved-niche, vulnerable-ecosystem, dispersal barriers) underscore the susceptibility of this woodland specialist to a climate and wildfire tandem. We offer adaptive management scenarios that may counterbalance these metrics and avoid the extirpation of this and other highly specialized, relictual woodland clades.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherROYAL SOCen
dc.relation.urlhttp://rsos.royalsocietypublishing.org/lookup/doi/10.1098/rsos.160047en
dc.rights© 2016 The Authors. Published by the Royal Society under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/, which permits unrestricted use, provided the original author and source are credited.en
dc.subjectclimate changeen
dc.subjectCrotalus cerberusen
dc.subjectdrainage vicarianceen
dc.subjectenvironmental niche modellingen
dc.subjectwildfireen
dc.titleAnthropogenic impacts drive niche and conservation metrics of a cryptic rattlesnake on the Colorado Plateau of western North Americaen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniv Arizona, Nat Resources & Environmen
dc.identifier.journalRoyal Society Open Scienceen
dc.description.noteOpen access.en
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item from the UA Faculty Publications collection is made available by the University of Arizona with support from the University of Arizona Libraries. If you have questions, please contact us at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.en
dc.eprint.versionFinal published versionen
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