Insomnia, Health-Related Quality of Life and Health Outcomes in Children: A Seven Year Longitudinal Cohort

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/617206
Title:
Insomnia, Health-Related Quality of Life and Health Outcomes in Children: A Seven Year Longitudinal Cohort
Author:
Combs, Daniel; Goodwin, James L.; Quan, Stuart F.; Morgan, Wayne J.; Shetty, Safal; Parthasarathy, Sairam
Affiliation:
Univ Arizona, Dept Pediat; Univ Arizona, Dept Med; Univ Arizona, Arizona Resp Ctr; Univ Arizona, Ctr Sleep Disorders,; Univ Arizona, Div Pulm Allergy Crit Care & Sleep Med
Issue Date:
2016-06-13
Publisher:
NATURE PUBLISHING GROUP
Citation:
Insomnia, Health-Related Quality of Life and Health Outcomes in Children: A Seven Year Longitudinal Cohort 2016, 6:27921 Scientific Reports
Journal:
Scientific Reports
Rights:
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.
Collection Information:
This item from the UA Faculty Publications collection is made available by the University of Arizona with support from the University of Arizona Libraries. If you have questions, please contact us at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.
Abstract:
Insomnia is common in children, and is associated with decreased school performance and increased psychopathology. Although adult insomnia is linked to worsened health-related quality of life (HRQOL), there is insufficient data evaluating insomnia and HRQOL in children. We examined the HRQOL and health associations of insomnia in a longitudinal cohort of 194 children (96 girls, age at study start 8.7 +/- 1.6 years, age at data analysis 15.0 +/- 1.8 years) over 7 years. International Classification of Sleep Disorders, second edition (ICSD2) derived insomnia was seen intermittently in 27% of children, and was persistent in 4%. Children reporting ICSD2-derived insomnia had lower HRQOL. Additionally, the presence of insomnia was associated with an increased risk of reporting a new medical condition (intermittent insomnia odds ratio 5.9 [95% CI 1.3-26.7, p = 0.04], persistent insomnia odds ratio 8 [95% CI 2.3-27.7, p = 0.001]). Persistent ICSD2-derived insomnia was associated with an increased risk of reporting a new medication (odds ratio 4.9 (95% CI 1.0-23.6), p = 0.049), and reporting a new psychiatric medication (odds ratio 13.7, 95% CI: 2.6-73.5, p = 0.002). These associations were present even after adjusting for socioeconomic factors and the presence of obstructive sleep apnea. Insomnia in children is associated with worsened HRQOL and health outcomes.
ISSN:
2045-2322
DOI:
10.1038/srep27921
Version:
Final published version
Sponsors:
National Institutes of Health [HL062373, HL095748, HL095799]; PCORI [IHS-1306-2505, 3394]; Arizona Respiratory Center, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ
Additional Links:
http://www.nature.com/articles/srep27921

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorCombs, Danielen
dc.contributor.authorGoodwin, James L.en
dc.contributor.authorQuan, Stuart F.en
dc.contributor.authorMorgan, Wayne J.en
dc.contributor.authorShetty, Safalen
dc.contributor.authorParthasarathy, Sairamen
dc.date.accessioned2016-07-19T02:03:00Z-
dc.date.available2016-07-19T02:03:00Z-
dc.date.issued2016-06-13-
dc.identifier.citationInsomnia, Health-Related Quality of Life and Health Outcomes in Children: A Seven Year Longitudinal Cohort 2016, 6:27921 Scientific Reportsen
dc.identifier.issn2045-2322-
dc.identifier.doi10.1038/srep27921-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/617206-
dc.description.abstractInsomnia is common in children, and is associated with decreased school performance and increased psychopathology. Although adult insomnia is linked to worsened health-related quality of life (HRQOL), there is insufficient data evaluating insomnia and HRQOL in children. We examined the HRQOL and health associations of insomnia in a longitudinal cohort of 194 children (96 girls, age at study start 8.7 +/- 1.6 years, age at data analysis 15.0 +/- 1.8 years) over 7 years. International Classification of Sleep Disorders, second edition (ICSD2) derived insomnia was seen intermittently in 27% of children, and was persistent in 4%. Children reporting ICSD2-derived insomnia had lower HRQOL. Additionally, the presence of insomnia was associated with an increased risk of reporting a new medical condition (intermittent insomnia odds ratio 5.9 [95% CI 1.3-26.7, p = 0.04], persistent insomnia odds ratio 8 [95% CI 2.3-27.7, p = 0.001]). Persistent ICSD2-derived insomnia was associated with an increased risk of reporting a new medication (odds ratio 4.9 (95% CI 1.0-23.6), p = 0.049), and reporting a new psychiatric medication (odds ratio 13.7, 95% CI: 2.6-73.5, p = 0.002). These associations were present even after adjusting for socioeconomic factors and the presence of obstructive sleep apnea. Insomnia in children is associated with worsened HRQOL and health outcomes.en
dc.description.sponsorshipNational Institutes of Health [HL062373, HL095748, HL095799]; PCORI [IHS-1306-2505, 3394]; Arizona Respiratory Center, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZen
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherNATURE PUBLISHING GROUPen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.nature.com/articles/srep27921en
dc.rightsThis work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.en
dc.titleInsomnia, Health-Related Quality of Life and Health Outcomes in Children: A Seven Year Longitudinal Cohorten
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniv Arizona, Dept Pediaten
dc.contributor.departmentUniv Arizona, Dept Meden
dc.contributor.departmentUniv Arizona, Arizona Resp Ctren
dc.contributor.departmentUniv Arizona, Ctr Sleep Disorders,en
dc.contributor.departmentUniv Arizona, Div Pulm Allergy Crit Care & Sleep Meden
dc.identifier.journalScientific Reportsen
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item from the UA Faculty Publications collection is made available by the University of Arizona with support from the University of Arizona Libraries. If you have questions, please contact us at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.en
dc.eprint.versionFinal published versionen
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