Sonography and hypotension: a change to critical problem solving in undergraduate medical education

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/617204
Title:
Sonography and hypotension: a change to critical problem solving in undergraduate medical education
Author:
Amini, Richard; Stolz, Lori A; Hernandez, Nicholas C; Gaskin, Kevin; Baker, Nicola; Sanders, Arthur Barry; Adhikari, Srikar
Affiliation:
Department of Emergency Medicine, University of Arizona Medical Center, College of Medicine, University of Arizona
Issue Date:
2016-01-14
Publisher:
Dove Press
Journal:
Advances in Medical Education and Practice
Rights:
© 2016 Amini et al. This work is published and licensed by Dove Medical Press Limited. The full terms of this license are available at https://www.dovepress.com/terms.php and incorporate the Creative Commons Attribution – Non Commercial (unported, v3.0) License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/).
Collection Information:
This item from the UA Faculty Publications collection is made available by the University of Arizona with support from the University of Arizona Libraries. If you have questions, please contact us at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.
Abstract:
Study objectives: Multiple curricula have been designed to teach medical students the basics of ultrasound; however, few focus on critical problem-solving. The objective of this study is to determine whether a theme-based ultrasound teaching session, dedicated to the use of ultrasound in the management of the hypotensive patient, can impact medical students’ ultrasound education and provide critical problem-solving exercises. Methods: This was a cross-sectional study using an innovative approach to train 3rd year medical students during a 1-day ultrasound training session. The students received a 1-hour didactic session on basic ultrasound physics and knobology and were also provided with YouTube hyperlinks, and links to smart phone educational applications, which demonstrated a variety of bedside ultrasound techniques. In small group sessions, students learned how to evaluate patients for pathology associated with hypotension. A knowledge assessment questionnaire was administered at the end of the session and again 3 months later. Student knowledge was also assessed using different clinical scenarios with multiple-choice questions. Results: One hundred and three 3rd year medical students participated in this study. Appropriate type of ultrasound was selected and accurate diagnosis was made in different hypotension clinical scenarios: pulmonary embolism, 81% (95% CI, 73%–89%); abdominal aortic aneurysm, 100%; and pneumothorax, 89% (95% CI, 82%–95%). The average confidence level in performing ultrasound-guided central line placement was 7/10, focused assessment with sonography for trauma was 8/10, inferior vena cava assessment was 8/10, evaluation for abdominal aortic aneurysm was 8/10, assessment for deep vein thrombus was 8/10, and cardiac ultrasound for contractility and overall function was 7/10. Student performance in the knowledge assessment portion of the questionnaire was an average of 74% (SD =11%) at the end of workshop and 74% (SD =12%) 3 months later (P=0.00). Conclusion: At our institution, we successfully integrated ultrasound and critical problemsolving instruction, as part of a 1-day workshop for undergraduate medical education
Description:
UA Open Access Publishing Fund
Note:
Open access.
DOI:
10.2147/AMEP.S97491
Keywords:
point-of-care ultrasound; undergraduate medical education; protocol-driven education; problem-based learning
Version:
Final published version
Additional Links:
https://www.dovepress.com/sonography-and-hypotension-a-change-to-critical-problem-solving-in-und-peer-reviewed-article-AMEP

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorAmini, Richarden
dc.contributor.authorStolz, Lori Aen
dc.contributor.authorHernandez, Nicholas Cen
dc.contributor.authorGaskin, Kevinen
dc.contributor.authorBaker, Nicolaen
dc.contributor.authorSanders, Arthur Barryen
dc.contributor.authorAdhikari, Srikaren
dc.date.accessioned2016-07-19T01:52:36Z-
dc.date.available2016-07-19T01:52:36Z-
dc.date.issued2016-01-14-
dc.identifier.doi10.2147/AMEP.S97491-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/617204-
dc.descriptionUA Open Access Publishing Funden
dc.description.abstractStudy objectives: Multiple curricula have been designed to teach medical students the basics of ultrasound; however, few focus on critical problem-solving. The objective of this study is to determine whether a theme-based ultrasound teaching session, dedicated to the use of ultrasound in the management of the hypotensive patient, can impact medical students’ ultrasound education and provide critical problem-solving exercises. Methods: This was a cross-sectional study using an innovative approach to train 3rd year medical students during a 1-day ultrasound training session. The students received a 1-hour didactic session on basic ultrasound physics and knobology and were also provided with YouTube hyperlinks, and links to smart phone educational applications, which demonstrated a variety of bedside ultrasound techniques. In small group sessions, students learned how to evaluate patients for pathology associated with hypotension. A knowledge assessment questionnaire was administered at the end of the session and again 3 months later. Student knowledge was also assessed using different clinical scenarios with multiple-choice questions. Results: One hundred and three 3rd year medical students participated in this study. Appropriate type of ultrasound was selected and accurate diagnosis was made in different hypotension clinical scenarios: pulmonary embolism, 81% (95% CI, 73%–89%); abdominal aortic aneurysm, 100%; and pneumothorax, 89% (95% CI, 82%–95%). The average confidence level in performing ultrasound-guided central line placement was 7/10, focused assessment with sonography for trauma was 8/10, inferior vena cava assessment was 8/10, evaluation for abdominal aortic aneurysm was 8/10, assessment for deep vein thrombus was 8/10, and cardiac ultrasound for contractility and overall function was 7/10. Student performance in the knowledge assessment portion of the questionnaire was an average of 74% (SD =11%) at the end of workshop and 74% (SD =12%) 3 months later (P=0.00). Conclusion: At our institution, we successfully integrated ultrasound and critical problemsolving instruction, as part of a 1-day workshop for undergraduate medical educationen
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherDove Pressen
dc.relation.urlhttps://www.dovepress.com/sonography-and-hypotension-a-change-to-critical-problem-solving-in-und-peer-reviewed-article-AMEPen
dc.rights© 2016 Amini et al. This work is published and licensed by Dove Medical Press Limited. The full terms of this license are available at https://www.dovepress.com/terms.php and incorporate the Creative Commons Attribution – Non Commercial (unported, v3.0) License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/).en
dc.subjectpoint-of-care ultrasounden
dc.subjectundergraduate medical educationen
dc.subjectprotocol-driven educationen
dc.subjectproblem-based learningen
dc.titleSonography and hypotension: a change to critical problem solving in undergraduate medical educationen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Emergency Medicine, University of Arizona Medical Center, College of Medicine, University of Arizonaen
dc.identifier.journalAdvances in Medical Education and Practiceen
dc.description.noteOpen access.en
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item from the UA Faculty Publications collection is made available by the University of Arizona with support from the University of Arizona Libraries. If you have questions, please contact us at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.en
dc.eprint.versionFinal published versionen
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