Feasibility of Spanish-language acquisition for acute medical care providers: novel curriculum for emergency medicine residencies

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/617203
Title:
Feasibility of Spanish-language acquisition for acute medical care providers: novel curriculum for emergency medicine residencies
Author:
Grall, Kriti H; Panchal, Ashish R; Chuffe, Eliud; Stoneking, Lisa R
Affiliation:
Department of Spanish and Portuguese, Department of Emergency Medicine, University of Arizona
Issue Date:
2016-02-18
Publisher:
Dove Press
Journal:
Advances in Medical Education and Practice
Rights:
© 2016 Grall et al. This work is published and licensed by Dove Medical Press Limited. The full terms of this license are available at https://www.dovepress.com/terms.php and incorporate the Creative Commons Attribution – Non Commercial (unported, v3.0) License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/).
Collection Information:
This item from the UA Faculty Publications collection is made available by the University of Arizona with support from the University of Arizona Libraries. If you have questions, please contact us at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.
Abstract:
Introduction: Language and cultural barriers are detriments to quality health care. In acute medical settings, these barriers are more pronounced, which can lead to poor patient outcomes. Materials and methods: We implemented a longitudinal Spanish-language immersion curriculum for emergency medicine (EM) resident physicians. This curriculum includes language and cultural instruction, and is integrated into the weekly EM didactic conference, longitudinal over the entire 3-year residency program. Language proficiency was assessed at baseline and annually on the Interagency Language Roundtable (ILR) scale, via an oral exam conducted by the same trained examiner each time. The objective of the curriculum was improvement of resident language skills to ILR level 1+ by year 3. Significance was evaluated through repeatedmeasures analysis of variance. Results: The curriculum was launched in July 2010 and followed through June 2012 (n=16). After 1 year, 38% had improved over one ILR level, with 50% achieving ILR 1+ or above. After year 2, 100% had improved over one level, with 90% achieving the objective level of ILR 1+. Mean ILR improved significantly from baseline, year 1, and year 2 (F=55, df =1; P,0.001). Conclusion: Implementation of a longitudinal, integrated Spanish-immersion curriculum is feasible and improves language skills in EM residents. The curriculum improved EM-resident language proficiency above the goal in just 2 years. Further studies will focus on the effect of language acquisition on patient care in acute settings
Description:
UA Open Access Publishing Fund
Note:
Open access.
DOI:
10.2147/AMEP.S96928
Keywords:
language; spanish; immersion curriculum; emergency medicine; graduate medical education
Version:
Final published version
Additional Links:
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4767065/

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorGrall, Kriti Hen
dc.contributor.authorPanchal, Ashish Ren
dc.contributor.authorChuffe, Eliuden
dc.contributor.authorStoneking, Lisa Ren
dc.date.accessioned2016-07-19T01:49:11Z-
dc.date.available2016-07-19T01:49:11Z-
dc.date.issued2016-02-18-
dc.identifier.doi10.2147/AMEP.S96928-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/617203-
dc.descriptionUA Open Access Publishing Funden
dc.description.abstractIntroduction: Language and cultural barriers are detriments to quality health care. In acute medical settings, these barriers are more pronounced, which can lead to poor patient outcomes. Materials and methods: We implemented a longitudinal Spanish-language immersion curriculum for emergency medicine (EM) resident physicians. This curriculum includes language and cultural instruction, and is integrated into the weekly EM didactic conference, longitudinal over the entire 3-year residency program. Language proficiency was assessed at baseline and annually on the Interagency Language Roundtable (ILR) scale, via an oral exam conducted by the same trained examiner each time. The objective of the curriculum was improvement of resident language skills to ILR level 1+ by year 3. Significance was evaluated through repeatedmeasures analysis of variance. Results: The curriculum was launched in July 2010 and followed through June 2012 (n=16). After 1 year, 38% had improved over one ILR level, with 50% achieving ILR 1+ or above. After year 2, 100% had improved over one level, with 90% achieving the objective level of ILR 1+. Mean ILR improved significantly from baseline, year 1, and year 2 (F=55, df =1; P,0.001). Conclusion: Implementation of a longitudinal, integrated Spanish-immersion curriculum is feasible and improves language skills in EM residents. The curriculum improved EM-resident language proficiency above the goal in just 2 years. Further studies will focus on the effect of language acquisition on patient care in acute settingsen
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherDove Pressen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4767065/en
dc.rights© 2016 Grall et al. This work is published and licensed by Dove Medical Press Limited. The full terms of this license are available at https://www.dovepress.com/terms.php and incorporate the Creative Commons Attribution – Non Commercial (unported, v3.0) License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/).en
dc.subjectlanguageen
dc.subjectspanishen
dc.subjectimmersion curriculumen
dc.subjectemergency medicineen
dc.subjectgraduate medical educationen
dc.titleFeasibility of Spanish-language acquisition for acute medical care providers: novel curriculum for emergency medicine residenciesen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Spanish and Portuguese, Department of Emergency Medicine, University of Arizonaen
dc.identifier.journalAdvances in Medical Education and Practiceen
dc.description.noteOpen access.en
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item from the UA Faculty Publications collection is made available by the University of Arizona with support from the University of Arizona Libraries. If you have questions, please contact us at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.en
dc.eprint.versionFinal published versionen
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