Direct effects dominate responses to climate perturbations in grassland plant communities

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/617187
Title:
Direct effects dominate responses to climate perturbations in grassland plant communities
Author:
Chu, Chengjin; Kleinhesselink, Andrew R.; Havstad, Kris M.; McClaran, Mitchel P.; Peters, Debra P.; Vermeire, Lance T.; Wei, Haiyan; Adler, Peter B.
Affiliation:
Univ Arizona, Sch Nat Resources & Environm
Issue Date:
2016-06-08
Publisher:
NATURE PUBLISHING GROUP
Citation:
Direct effects dominate responses to climate perturbations in grassland plant communities 2016, 7:11766 Nature Communications
Journal:
Nature Communications
Rights:
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License
Collection Information:
This item from the UA Faculty Publications collection is made available by the University of Arizona with support from the University of Arizona Libraries. If you have questions, please contact us at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.
Abstract:
Theory predicts that strong indirect effects of environmental change will impact communities when niche differences between competitors are small and variation in the direct effects experienced by competitors is large, but empirical tests are lacking. Here we estimate negative frequency dependence, a proxy for niche differences, and quantify the direct and indirect effects of climate change on each species. Consistent with theory, in four of five communities indirect effects are strongest for species showing weak negative frequency dependence. Indirect effects are also stronger in communities where there is greater variation in direct effects. Overall responses to climate perturbations are driven primarily by direct effects, suggesting that single species models may be adequate for forecasting the impacts of climate change in these communities.
ISSN:
2041-1723
DOI:
10.1038/ncomms11766
Version:
Final published version
Sponsors:
National Science Foundation [DEB-1054040, DEB-1235828]; Utah Agriculture Experiment station [8881]; National Natural Science Foundation of China [31570426, 31000199]; Program for New Century Excellent Talents in University [NCET-12-0248]; Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities [lzujbky-2013-k15]; National Science Foundation; Arizona Experiment Station, USDA-NIFA [ARZT-1392500-M12-197]; USDA-CEAP [AZRT-312860-G-t2-51]
Additional Links:
http://www.nature.com/doifinder/10.1038/ncomms11766

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorChu, Chengjinen
dc.contributor.authorKleinhesselink, Andrew R.en
dc.contributor.authorHavstad, Kris M.en
dc.contributor.authorMcClaran, Mitchel P.en
dc.contributor.authorPeters, Debra P.en
dc.contributor.authorVermeire, Lance T.en
dc.contributor.authorWei, Haiyanen
dc.contributor.authorAdler, Peter B.en
dc.date.accessioned2016-07-19T02:22:18Z-
dc.date.available2016-07-19T02:22:18Z-
dc.date.issued2016-06-08-
dc.identifier.citationDirect effects dominate responses to climate perturbations in grassland plant communities 2016, 7:11766 Nature Communicationsen
dc.identifier.issn2041-1723-
dc.identifier.doi10.1038/ncomms11766-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/617187-
dc.description.abstractTheory predicts that strong indirect effects of environmental change will impact communities when niche differences between competitors are small and variation in the direct effects experienced by competitors is large, but empirical tests are lacking. Here we estimate negative frequency dependence, a proxy for niche differences, and quantify the direct and indirect effects of climate change on each species. Consistent with theory, in four of five communities indirect effects are strongest for species showing weak negative frequency dependence. Indirect effects are also stronger in communities where there is greater variation in direct effects. Overall responses to climate perturbations are driven primarily by direct effects, suggesting that single species models may be adequate for forecasting the impacts of climate change in these communities.en
dc.description.sponsorshipNational Science Foundation [DEB-1054040, DEB-1235828]; Utah Agriculture Experiment station [8881]; National Natural Science Foundation of China [31570426, 31000199]; Program for New Century Excellent Talents in University [NCET-12-0248]; Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities [lzujbky-2013-k15]; National Science Foundation; Arizona Experiment Station, USDA-NIFA [ARZT-1392500-M12-197]; USDA-CEAP [AZRT-312860-G-t2-51]en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherNATURE PUBLISHING GROUPen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.nature.com/doifinder/10.1038/ncomms11766en
dc.rightsThis work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International Licenseen
dc.titleDirect effects dominate responses to climate perturbations in grassland plant communitiesen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniv Arizona, Sch Nat Resources & Environmen
dc.identifier.journalNature Communicationsen
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item from the UA Faculty Publications collection is made available by the University of Arizona with support from the University of Arizona Libraries. If you have questions, please contact us at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.en
dc.eprint.versionFinal published versionen
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