A meta-analysis of MSI frequency and race in colorectal cancer

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/617185
Title:
A meta-analysis of MSI frequency and race in colorectal cancer
Author:
Ashktorab, Hassan; Ahuja, Sadhna; Kannan, Lakshmi; Llor, Xavier; Nathan, Ellis; Xicola, Rosa M.; Adeyinka, Laiyemo O.; Carethers, John M.; Brim, Hassan; Nouraie, Mehdi
Affiliation:
Univ Arizona, Ctr Canc, Canc Biol Res Program
Issue Date:
2014-11-09
Publisher:
IMPACT JOURNALS LLC
Citation:
A meta-analysis of MSI frequency and race in colorectal cancer 2014 Oncotarget
Journal:
Oncotarget
Rights:
Creative Commons Attribution License (CCAL)
Collection Information:
This item from the UA Faculty Publications collection is made available by the University of Arizona with support from the University of Arizona Libraries. If you have questions, please contact us at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.
Abstract:
PURPOSE: African Americans (AA) are at a higher risk of colorectal cancer (CRC) and some studies report a higher frequency of microsatellite instability (MSI) in this population while others report lower frequency compared to Caucasians. AIM: To determine and evaluate the association of race and clinical factors with MSI frequency through meta-analysis. METHODS: Twenty-two studies out of 15,105 (1997-2015) were evaluated after a search in different literature databases, using keywords "colorectal cancer, microsatellite instability, African Americans, Caucasians and Hispanics". We used random effect meta-analysis to calculate the MSI frequency in all studies as well as in African American and Caucasian samples. Meta-regression analysis was used to assess the univariate effect of race, gender, age, tumor location and stage on MSI frequency. RESULTS: The overall MSI frequency among CRCs was 17% (95% CI: 15%-19%, I-2 = 91%). In studies with available race data, The MSI rate among AAs, Hispanics and Caucasians were 12%, 12% and 14% respectively and was not significantly different. Sub-group analysis of studies with racial information indicates MSI OR of 0.78 for AAs compared to Caucasians. CONCLUSION: CRCs demonstrate an overall MSI frequency of 17%. MSI frequency differences between AAs and Caucasians were not pronounced, suggesting that other factors contribute to the racial disparity. The methodological approaches and biological sources of the variation seen in MSI frequency between different studies need to be further investigated.
ISSN:
1949-2553
DOI:
10.18632/oncotarget.8945
Keywords:
MSI; colorectal cancer; african americans; hispanics; caucasians
Version:
Final published version
Sponsors:
National Institute of Minority Health and Health Disparities; National Cancer Institute [G12MD007597, U01CA162147, R01CA206010]
Additional Links:
http://www.oncotarget.com/abstract/8945

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorAshktorab, Hassanen
dc.contributor.authorAhuja, Sadhnaen
dc.contributor.authorKannan, Lakshmien
dc.contributor.authorLlor, Xavieren
dc.contributor.authorNathan, Ellisen
dc.contributor.authorXicola, Rosa M.en
dc.contributor.authorAdeyinka, Laiyemo O.en
dc.contributor.authorCarethers, John M.en
dc.contributor.authorBrim, Hassanen
dc.contributor.authorNouraie, Mehdien
dc.date.accessioned2016-07-19T02:18:35Z-
dc.date.available2016-07-19T02:18:35Z-
dc.date.issued2014-11-09-
dc.identifier.citationA meta-analysis of MSI frequency and race in colorectal cancer 2014 Oncotargeten
dc.identifier.issn1949-2553-
dc.identifier.doi10.18632/oncotarget.8945-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/617185-
dc.description.abstractPURPOSE: African Americans (AA) are at a higher risk of colorectal cancer (CRC) and some studies report a higher frequency of microsatellite instability (MSI) in this population while others report lower frequency compared to Caucasians. AIM: To determine and evaluate the association of race and clinical factors with MSI frequency through meta-analysis. METHODS: Twenty-two studies out of 15,105 (1997-2015) were evaluated after a search in different literature databases, using keywords "colorectal cancer, microsatellite instability, African Americans, Caucasians and Hispanics". We used random effect meta-analysis to calculate the MSI frequency in all studies as well as in African American and Caucasian samples. Meta-regression analysis was used to assess the univariate effect of race, gender, age, tumor location and stage on MSI frequency. RESULTS: The overall MSI frequency among CRCs was 17% (95% CI: 15%-19%, I-2 = 91%). In studies with available race data, The MSI rate among AAs, Hispanics and Caucasians were 12%, 12% and 14% respectively and was not significantly different. Sub-group analysis of studies with racial information indicates MSI OR of 0.78 for AAs compared to Caucasians. CONCLUSION: CRCs demonstrate an overall MSI frequency of 17%. MSI frequency differences between AAs and Caucasians were not pronounced, suggesting that other factors contribute to the racial disparity. The methodological approaches and biological sources of the variation seen in MSI frequency between different studies need to be further investigated.en
dc.description.sponsorshipNational Institute of Minority Health and Health Disparities; National Cancer Institute [G12MD007597, U01CA162147, R01CA206010]en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherIMPACT JOURNALS LLCen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.oncotarget.com/abstract/8945en
dc.rightsCreative Commons Attribution License (CCAL)en
dc.subjectMSIen
dc.subjectcolorectal canceren
dc.subjectafrican americansen
dc.subjecthispanicsen
dc.subjectcaucasiansen
dc.titleA meta-analysis of MSI frequency and race in colorectal canceren
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniv Arizona, Ctr Canc, Canc Biol Res Programen
dc.identifier.journalOncotargeten
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item from the UA Faculty Publications collection is made available by the University of Arizona with support from the University of Arizona Libraries. If you have questions, please contact us at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.en
dc.eprint.versionFinal published versionen
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