Mesolimbic neuropeptide W coordinates stress responses under novel environments

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/616999
Title:
Mesolimbic neuropeptide W coordinates stress responses under novel environments
Author:
Motoike, Toshiyuki; Long, Jeffrey M.; Tanaka, Hirokazu; Sinton, Christopher M.; Skach, Amber; Williams, S. Clay; Hammer, Robert E.; Sakurai, Takeshi; Yanagisawa, Masashi
Affiliation:
Univ Arizona, Dept Med, Arizona Resp Ctr
Issue Date:
2016-05-24
Publisher:
NATL ACAD SCIENCES
Citation:
Mesolimbic neuropeptide W coordinates stress responses under novel environments 2016, 113 (21):6023 Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Journal:
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Rights:
Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by National Academy of Sciences.
Collection Information:
This item from the UA Faculty Publications collection is made available by the University of Arizona with support from the University of Arizona Libraries. If you have questions, please contact us at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.
Abstract:
Neuropeptide B (NPB) and neuropeptide W(NPW) are endogenous neuropeptide ligands for the G protein-coupled receptors NPBWR1 and NPBWR2. Here we report that the majority of NPW neurons in the mesolimbic region possess tyrosine hydroxylase immunoreactivity, indicating that a small subset of dopaminergic neurons coexpress NPW. These NPW-containing neurons densely and exclusively innervate two limbic system nuclei in adult mouse brain: the lateral bed nucleus of the stria terminalis and the lateral part of the central amygdala nucleus (CeAL). In the CeAL of wild-type mice, restraint stress resulted in an inhibition of cellular activity, but this stress-induced inhibition was attenuated in the CeAL neurons of NPW-/- mice. Moreover, the response of NPW-/- mice to either formalin-induced pain stimuli or a live rat (i. e., a potential predator) was abnormal only when they were placed in a novel environment: The mice failed to show the normal species-specific self-protective and aversive reactions. In contrast, the behavior of NPW-/- mice in a habituated environment was indistinguishable from that of wildtype mice. These results indicate that the NPW/NPBWR1 system could play a critical role in the gating of stressful stimuli during exposure to novel environments.
Note:
Authors retain copyright and extensive rights to use and reuse their work. These rights include, on acceptance for publication by PNAS, depositing the final author manuscript in an institutional repository, provided that the PNAS-formatted PDF is not used and a link to the article on the PNAS website is included.
ISSN:
0027-8424; 1091-6490
DOI:
10.1073/pnas.1518658113
Keywords:
amygdala; fear; pain; dopaminergic; mouse
Version:
Final accepted manuscript
Sponsors:
Keck Foundation; Perot Family Foundation; Exploratory Research for Advanced Technology of Japan Science and Technology Agency; World Premier International Research Center Initiative from the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology, Japan; Intramural Research Program of the NIH
Additional Links:
http://www.pnas.org/lookup/doi/10.1073/pnas.1518658113

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorMotoike, Toshiyukien
dc.contributor.authorLong, Jeffrey M.en
dc.contributor.authorTanaka, Hirokazuen
dc.contributor.authorSinton, Christopher M.en
dc.contributor.authorSkach, Amberen
dc.contributor.authorWilliams, S. Clayen
dc.contributor.authorHammer, Robert E.en
dc.contributor.authorSakurai, Takeshien
dc.contributor.authorYanagisawa, Masashien
dc.date.accessioned2016-07-15T01:14:52Z-
dc.date.available2016-07-15T01:14:52Z-
dc.date.issued2016-05-24-
dc.identifier.citationMesolimbic neuropeptide W coordinates stress responses under novel environments 2016, 113 (21):6023 Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciencesen
dc.identifier.issn0027-8424-
dc.identifier.issn1091-6490-
dc.identifier.doi10.1073/pnas.1518658113-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/616999-
dc.description.abstractNeuropeptide B (NPB) and neuropeptide W(NPW) are endogenous neuropeptide ligands for the G protein-coupled receptors NPBWR1 and NPBWR2. Here we report that the majority of NPW neurons in the mesolimbic region possess tyrosine hydroxylase immunoreactivity, indicating that a small subset of dopaminergic neurons coexpress NPW. These NPW-containing neurons densely and exclusively innervate two limbic system nuclei in adult mouse brain: the lateral bed nucleus of the stria terminalis and the lateral part of the central amygdala nucleus (CeAL). In the CeAL of wild-type mice, restraint stress resulted in an inhibition of cellular activity, but this stress-induced inhibition was attenuated in the CeAL neurons of NPW-/- mice. Moreover, the response of NPW-/- mice to either formalin-induced pain stimuli or a live rat (i. e., a potential predator) was abnormal only when they were placed in a novel environment: The mice failed to show the normal species-specific self-protective and aversive reactions. In contrast, the behavior of NPW-/- mice in a habituated environment was indistinguishable from that of wildtype mice. These results indicate that the NPW/NPBWR1 system could play a critical role in the gating of stressful stimuli during exposure to novel environments.en
dc.description.sponsorshipKeck Foundation; Perot Family Foundation; Exploratory Research for Advanced Technology of Japan Science and Technology Agency; World Premier International Research Center Initiative from the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology, Japan; Intramural Research Program of the NIHen
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherNATL ACAD SCIENCESen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.pnas.org/lookup/doi/10.1073/pnas.1518658113en
dc.rightsCopyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by National Academy of Sciences.en
dc.subjectamygdalaen
dc.subjectfearen
dc.subjectpainen
dc.subjectdopaminergicen
dc.subjectmouseen
dc.titleMesolimbic neuropeptide W coordinates stress responses under novel environmentsen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniv Arizona, Dept Med, Arizona Resp Ctren
dc.identifier.journalProceedings of the National Academy of Sciencesen
dc.description.noteAuthors retain copyright and extensive rights to use and reuse their work. These rights include, on acceptance for publication by PNAS, depositing the final author manuscript in an institutional repository, provided that the PNAS-formatted PDF is not used and a link to the article on the PNAS website is included.-
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item from the UA Faculty Publications collection is made available by the University of Arizona with support from the University of Arizona Libraries. If you have questions, please contact us at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.en
dc.eprint.versionFinal accepted manuscripten
All Items in UA Campus Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.