Drought, pollen and nectar availability, and pollination success

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/616997
Title:
Drought, pollen and nectar availability, and pollination success
Author:
Waser, Nickolas M.; Price, Mary V.
Affiliation:
Univ Arizona, Sch Nat Resources & Environm
Issue Date:
2016-06
Publisher:
WILEY-BLACKWELL
Citation:
Drought, pollen and nectar availability, and pollination success 2016, 97 (6):1400 Ecology
Journal:
Ecology
Rights:
© 2016 by the Ecological Society of America
Collection Information:
This item from the UA Faculty Publications collection is made available by the University of Arizona with support from the University of Arizona Libraries. If you have questions, please contact us at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.
Abstract:
Pollination success of animal-pollinated flowers depends on rate of pollinator visits and on pollen deposition per visit, both of which should vary with the pollen and nectar "neighborhoods" of a plant, i.e., with pollen and nectar availability in nearby plants. One determinant of these neighborhoods is per-flower production of pollen and nectar, which is likely to respond to environmental influences. In this study, we explored environmental effects on pollen and nectar production and on pollination success in order to follow up a surprising result from a previous study: flowers of Ipomopsis aggregata received less pollen in years of high visitation by their hummingbird pollinators. A new analysis of the earlier data indicated that high bird visitation corresponded to drought years. We hypothesized that drought might contribute to the enigmatic prior result if it decreases both nectar and pollen production: in dry years, low nectar availability could cause hummingbirds to visit flowers at a higher rate, and low pollen availability could cause them to deposit less pollen per visit. A greenhouse experiment demonstrated that drought does reduce both pollen and nectar production by I. aggregata flowers. This result was corroborated across 6 yr of variable precipitation and soil moisture in four unmanipulated field populations. In addition, experimental removal of pollen from flowers reduced the pollen received by nearby flowers. We conclude that there is much to learn about how abiotic and biotic environmental drivers jointly affect pollen and nectar production and availability, and how this contributes to pollen and nectar neighborhoods and thus influences pollination success.
Note:
Authors may post their articles to their personal or home institution’s website or institutional repository and may make and distribute photocopies of such articles.
ISSN:
00129658
DOI:
10.1890/15-1423.1
Keywords:
drought; experiment; hummingbird visitation; nectar neighborhood; nectar production; pollen limitation; pollen neighborhood; pollen production; pollen receipt; pollination success
Version:
Final published version
Additional Links:
http://doi.wiley.com/10.1890/15-1423.1

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorWaser, Nickolas M.en
dc.contributor.authorPrice, Mary V.en
dc.date.accessioned2016-07-15T01:02:52Z-
dc.date.available2016-07-15T01:02:52Z-
dc.date.issued2016-06-
dc.identifier.citationDrought, pollen and nectar availability, and pollination success 2016, 97 (6):1400 Ecologyen
dc.identifier.issn00129658-
dc.identifier.doi10.1890/15-1423.1-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/616997-
dc.description.abstractPollination success of animal-pollinated flowers depends on rate of pollinator visits and on pollen deposition per visit, both of which should vary with the pollen and nectar "neighborhoods" of a plant, i.e., with pollen and nectar availability in nearby plants. One determinant of these neighborhoods is per-flower production of pollen and nectar, which is likely to respond to environmental influences. In this study, we explored environmental effects on pollen and nectar production and on pollination success in order to follow up a surprising result from a previous study: flowers of Ipomopsis aggregata received less pollen in years of high visitation by their hummingbird pollinators. A new analysis of the earlier data indicated that high bird visitation corresponded to drought years. We hypothesized that drought might contribute to the enigmatic prior result if it decreases both nectar and pollen production: in dry years, low nectar availability could cause hummingbirds to visit flowers at a higher rate, and low pollen availability could cause them to deposit less pollen per visit. A greenhouse experiment demonstrated that drought does reduce both pollen and nectar production by I. aggregata flowers. This result was corroborated across 6 yr of variable precipitation and soil moisture in four unmanipulated field populations. In addition, experimental removal of pollen from flowers reduced the pollen received by nearby flowers. We conclude that there is much to learn about how abiotic and biotic environmental drivers jointly affect pollen and nectar production and availability, and how this contributes to pollen and nectar neighborhoods and thus influences pollination success.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherWILEY-BLACKWELLen
dc.relation.urlhttp://doi.wiley.com/10.1890/15-1423.1en
dc.rights© 2016 by the Ecological Society of Americaen
dc.subjectdroughten
dc.subjectexperimenten
dc.subjecthummingbird visitationen
dc.subjectnectar neighborhooden
dc.subjectnectar productionen
dc.subjectpollen limitationen
dc.subjectpollen neighborhooden
dc.subjectpollen productionen
dc.subjectpollen receipten
dc.subjectpollination successen
dc.titleDrought, pollen and nectar availability, and pollination successen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniv Arizona, Sch Nat Resources & Environmen
dc.identifier.journalEcologyen
dc.description.noteAuthors may post their articles to their personal or home institution’s website or institutional repository and may make and distribute photocopies of such articles.en
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item from the UA Faculty Publications collection is made available by the University of Arizona with support from the University of Arizona Libraries. If you have questions, please contact us at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.en
dc.eprint.versionFinal published versionen
dc.contributor.institutionRocky Mountain Biological Laboratory; P. O. Box 519 Crested Butte Colorado 81224 USA-
dc.contributor.institutionRocky Mountain Biological Laboratory; P. O. Box 519 Crested Butte Colorado 81224 USA-
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