Effect of surface roughness and mulch on semi-arid revegetation success, soil chemistry and soil movement

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/616986
Title:
Effect of surface roughness and mulch on semi-arid revegetation success, soil chemistry and soil movement
Author:
Beggy, Holly M.; Fehmi, Jeffrey S. ( 0000-0003-0618-9740 )
Affiliation:
Univ Arizona, Sch Nat Resources & Environm
Issue Date:
2016-08
Publisher:
ELSEVIER SCIENCE BV
Citation:
Effect of surface roughness and mulch on semi-arid revegetation success, soil chemistry and soil movement 2016, 143:215 CATENA
Journal:
CATENA
Rights:
© 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. This is an open access article under the CC BY-NC-ND license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/)
Collection Information:
This item from the UA Faculty Publications collection is made available by the University of Arizona with support from the University of Arizona Libraries. If you have questions, please contact us at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.
Abstract:
For the successful reclamation of disturbed land, the reduction of initial erosion risk must be balanced with later vegetation establishment. A combination of erosion control and revegetation practices was researched using commercial (full-sized) equipment on a semi-desert grassland site in southern Arizona, USA. Two soils with different parent materials were used to add a 30 cm cap on sites at two elevations: 1646 and 1403 m asl. There were two surface roughness treatments: smooth and rough. Three straw mulch treatments were applied: no mulch, mulch incorporated into the surface soil, and mulch tackified onto the surface. Plots were planted with a 10 species native mix dominated by perennial grasses. After two growing seasons, the incorporated mulch treatment resulted in significantly more seeded grass aboveground biomass than the no mulch treatment while the no mulch treatment had more forb and volunteer biomass than the surface mulch treatment. There was significantly higher erosion on the rough surface treatment compared to the smooth surface. Increasing perennial grass biomass was correlated with reduced erosion while forb and volunteer biomass showed no relationship with erosion. The smooth surface with surface mulch best established perennial grasses, minimized weeds, and reduced erosion. This combination of practices both minimized erosion as well as maximized vegetation establishment. (C) 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V.
ISSN:
03418162
DOI:
10.1016/j.catena.2016.04.011
Keywords:
Erosion; Warm-season perennial grasses; Arizona; Bouteloua curtipendula; Soil pH
Version:
Final published version
Sponsors:
Rosemont Copper Company
Additional Links:
http://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0341816216301485

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorBeggy, Holly M.en
dc.contributor.authorFehmi, Jeffrey S.en
dc.date.accessioned2016-07-15T00:11:10Z-
dc.date.available2016-07-15T00:11:10Z-
dc.date.issued2016-08-
dc.identifier.citationEffect of surface roughness and mulch on semi-arid revegetation success, soil chemistry and soil movement 2016, 143:215 CATENAen
dc.identifier.issn03418162-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.catena.2016.04.011-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/616986-
dc.description.abstractFor the successful reclamation of disturbed land, the reduction of initial erosion risk must be balanced with later vegetation establishment. A combination of erosion control and revegetation practices was researched using commercial (full-sized) equipment on a semi-desert grassland site in southern Arizona, USA. Two soils with different parent materials were used to add a 30 cm cap on sites at two elevations: 1646 and 1403 m asl. There were two surface roughness treatments: smooth and rough. Three straw mulch treatments were applied: no mulch, mulch incorporated into the surface soil, and mulch tackified onto the surface. Plots were planted with a 10 species native mix dominated by perennial grasses. After two growing seasons, the incorporated mulch treatment resulted in significantly more seeded grass aboveground biomass than the no mulch treatment while the no mulch treatment had more forb and volunteer biomass than the surface mulch treatment. There was significantly higher erosion on the rough surface treatment compared to the smooth surface. Increasing perennial grass biomass was correlated with reduced erosion while forb and volunteer biomass showed no relationship with erosion. The smooth surface with surface mulch best established perennial grasses, minimized weeds, and reduced erosion. This combination of practices both minimized erosion as well as maximized vegetation establishment. (C) 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V.en
dc.description.sponsorshipRosemont Copper Companyen
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherELSEVIER SCIENCE BVen
dc.relation.urlhttp://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0341816216301485en
dc.rights© 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. This is an open access article under the CC BY-NC-ND license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/)en
dc.subjectErosionen
dc.subjectWarm-season perennial grassesen
dc.subjectArizonaen
dc.subjectBouteloua curtipendulaen
dc.subjectSoil pHen
dc.titleEffect of surface roughness and mulch on semi-arid revegetation success, soil chemistry and soil movementen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniv Arizona, Sch Nat Resources & Environmen
dc.identifier.journalCATENAen
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item from the UA Faculty Publications collection is made available by the University of Arizona with support from the University of Arizona Libraries. If you have questions, please contact us at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.en
dc.eprint.versionFinal published versionen
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