Uprooted buffelgrass thatch reduces buffelgrass seedling establishment

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/616972
Title:
Uprooted buffelgrass thatch reduces buffelgrass seedling establishment
Author:
Jernigan, Marcus B.; McClaran, Mitchel P.; Biedenbender, Sharon H.; Fehmi, Jeffrey S.
Affiliation:
Univ Arizona, Sch Nat Resources & Environm
Issue Date:
2016-04-12
Publisher:
TAYLOR & FRANCIS INC
Citation:
Uprooted buffelgrass thatch reduces buffelgrass seedling establishment 2016, 30 (3):320 Arid Land Research and Management
Journal:
Arid Land Research and Management
Rights:
© 2016 Marcus B. Jernigan, Mitchel P. McClaran, Sharon H. Biedenbender, and Jeffrey S. Fehmi. This is an Open Access article. Non-commercial re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly attributed, cited, and is not altered, transformed, or built upon in any way, is permitted. The moral rights of the named author(s) have been asserted.
Collection Information:
This item from the UA Faculty Publications collection is made available by the University of Arizona with support from the University of Arizona Libraries. If you have questions, please contact us at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.
Abstract:
Buffelgrass (Pennisetum ciliare (L.) Link), a non-native perennial bunchgrass, invades ecologically intact areas of the Sonoran Desert. It competitively excludes native plants and increases fire frequency and intensity. Since the 1990s, whole buffelgrass plants have been manually uprooted and removed to control the invasion in southern Arizona. Uprooting plants results in bare, disturbed soil which promotes buffelgrass seed germination. This study examined whether leaving entire uprooted buffelgrass plants (thatch) on a field site reduces future buffelgrass establishment compared to removing uprooted plants from the site. A secondary goal was to determine whether light reduction and autoallelopathy were major factors in the negative effect of thatch on buffelgrass seedling density. Field plots with an average of 8,095 kg/ha thatch had 1.9 buffelgrass seedlings/m(2) which was significantly fewer than the 2.9 seedlings/m(2) in plots without thatch. Thatched portions of thatch plots (50% of their total area) had only 0.7 seedlings/m(2). In the greenhouse, which reduced outdoor light intensity by 35.2%, buffelgrass seeds sown in bare soil resulted in significantly higher seedling density than beneath buffelgrass thatch. Potential autoallelopathic chemicals leached from partially decomposed buffelgrass thatch and leached thatch had an intermediate but not significant (p = 0.09) effect on seedling numbers. Results suggest that leaving uprooted buffelgrass plants has the benefit of reducing seedling establishment in the area disturbed by uprooting.
ISSN:
1532-4982; 1532-4990
DOI:
10.1080/15324982.2015.1107152
Keywords:
Autoallelopathy; invasive species; shading; southern Arizona
Version:
Final published version
Sponsors:
Rosemont Copper Company; University of Arizona Agricultural Experiment Station
Additional Links:
http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/15324982.2015.1107152

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorJernigan, Marcus B.en
dc.contributor.authorMcClaran, Mitchel P.en
dc.contributor.authorBiedenbender, Sharon H.en
dc.contributor.authorFehmi, Jeffrey S.en
dc.date.accessioned2016-07-15T00:16:14Z-
dc.date.available2016-07-15T00:16:14Z-
dc.date.issued2016-04-12-
dc.identifier.citationUprooted buffelgrass thatch reduces buffelgrass seedling establishment 2016, 30 (3):320 Arid Land Research and Managementen
dc.identifier.issn1532-4982-
dc.identifier.issn1532-4990-
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/15324982.2015.1107152-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/616972-
dc.description.abstractBuffelgrass (Pennisetum ciliare (L.) Link), a non-native perennial bunchgrass, invades ecologically intact areas of the Sonoran Desert. It competitively excludes native plants and increases fire frequency and intensity. Since the 1990s, whole buffelgrass plants have been manually uprooted and removed to control the invasion in southern Arizona. Uprooting plants results in bare, disturbed soil which promotes buffelgrass seed germination. This study examined whether leaving entire uprooted buffelgrass plants (thatch) on a field site reduces future buffelgrass establishment compared to removing uprooted plants from the site. A secondary goal was to determine whether light reduction and autoallelopathy were major factors in the negative effect of thatch on buffelgrass seedling density. Field plots with an average of 8,095 kg/ha thatch had 1.9 buffelgrass seedlings/m(2) which was significantly fewer than the 2.9 seedlings/m(2) in plots without thatch. Thatched portions of thatch plots (50% of their total area) had only 0.7 seedlings/m(2). In the greenhouse, which reduced outdoor light intensity by 35.2%, buffelgrass seeds sown in bare soil resulted in significantly higher seedling density than beneath buffelgrass thatch. Potential autoallelopathic chemicals leached from partially decomposed buffelgrass thatch and leached thatch had an intermediate but not significant (p = 0.09) effect on seedling numbers. Results suggest that leaving uprooted buffelgrass plants has the benefit of reducing seedling establishment in the area disturbed by uprooting.en
dc.description.sponsorshipRosemont Copper Company; University of Arizona Agricultural Experiment Stationen
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherTAYLOR & FRANCIS INCen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/15324982.2015.1107152en
dc.rights© 2016 Marcus B. Jernigan, Mitchel P. McClaran, Sharon H. Biedenbender, and Jeffrey S. Fehmi. This is an Open Access article. Non-commercial re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly attributed, cited, and is not altered, transformed, or built upon in any way, is permitted. The moral rights of the named author(s) have been asserted.en
dc.subjectAutoallelopathyen
dc.subjectinvasive speciesen
dc.subjectshadingen
dc.subjectsouthern Arizonaen
dc.titleUprooted buffelgrass thatch reduces buffelgrass seedling establishmenten
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniv Arizona, Sch Nat Resources & Environmen
dc.identifier.journalArid Land Research and Managementen
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item from the UA Faculty Publications collection is made available by the University of Arizona with support from the University of Arizona Libraries. If you have questions, please contact us at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.en
dc.eprint.versionFinal published versionen
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