EFFECTS OF RADAR-ESTIMATED PRECIPITATION UNCERTAINTY ON DIFFERENT RUNOFF-GENERATION MECHANISMS

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/615775
Title:
EFFECTS OF RADAR-ESTIMATED PRECIPITATION UNCERTAINTY ON DIFFERENT RUNOFF-GENERATION MECHANISMS
Author:
Winchell, Michael; Gupta, Hoshin Vijai; Sorooshian, Soroosh
Affiliation:
Department of Hydrology & Water Resources, The University of Arizona
Publisher:
Department of Hydrology and Water Resources, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ)
Issue Date:
1997
Rights:
Copyright © Arizona Board of Regents
Collection Information:
This title from the Hydrology & Water Resources Technical Reports collection is made available by the Department of Hydrology & Atmospheric Sciences and the University Libraries, University of Arizona. If you have questions about titles in this collection, please contact repository@u.library.arizona.edu.
Abstract:
Runoff generation has been shown to be very sensitive to precipitation input. With the use of precipitation estimates from weather radar, errors are introduced from both the transformation from reflectivity to precipitation rate and the spatial and temporal aggregation of the radar product. Currently, a significant degree of uncertainty exists in the accuracy of radar-based precipitation estimates. When uncalibrated or poorly calibrated radar products were used as input to a rainfall-runoff model, the resulting predicted runoff varied severely from the runoff generated using well-calibrated radar products. Another source of uncertainty, errors in the precipitation system structure due to aggregation in time and space, has also been shown to affect runoff generation. This study focuses on separating the primary runoff- generating mechanisms -- infiltration excess and saturation excess -- to assess their responses to variable precipitation inputs individually. For the case of saturation excess runoff, there was minimal sensitivity due to temporal aggregation of the precipitation; however, there was considerable sensitivity to spatial aggregation. For the case of infiltration excess runoff, temporal and spatial aggregation of the precipitation significantly reduced the amount of runoff produced. The magnitudes of these runoff reductions varied between storms and showed a high degree of dependence on storm characteristics, particularly the maximum precipitation intensity.
Series/Report no.:
Technical Reports on Hydrology and Water Resources, No. 97-080
Sponsors:
Primary financial support for this research was granted by the Natural and Man-Made Hazard Mitigation Program of the National Science Foundation (BCS-9307411), with partial support from the Hydrologic Research Laboratory of the National Weather Service (NA57WH0575) and the NASA -EOS project (NAGW2425). The aforementioned support is greatly appreciated.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorWinchell, Michaelen
dc.contributor.authorGupta, Hoshin Vijaien
dc.contributor.authorSorooshian, Sorooshen
dc.date.accessioned2016-07-07T23:59:44Z-
dc.date.available2016-07-07T23:59:44Z-
dc.date.issued1997-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/615775-
dc.description.abstractRunoff generation has been shown to be very sensitive to precipitation input. With the use of precipitation estimates from weather radar, errors are introduced from both the transformation from reflectivity to precipitation rate and the spatial and temporal aggregation of the radar product. Currently, a significant degree of uncertainty exists in the accuracy of radar-based precipitation estimates. When uncalibrated or poorly calibrated radar products were used as input to a rainfall-runoff model, the resulting predicted runoff varied severely from the runoff generated using well-calibrated radar products. Another source of uncertainty, errors in the precipitation system structure due to aggregation in time and space, has also been shown to affect runoff generation. This study focuses on separating the primary runoff- generating mechanisms -- infiltration excess and saturation excess -- to assess their responses to variable precipitation inputs individually. For the case of saturation excess runoff, there was minimal sensitivity due to temporal aggregation of the precipitation; however, there was considerable sensitivity to spatial aggregation. For the case of infiltration excess runoff, temporal and spatial aggregation of the precipitation significantly reduced the amount of runoff produced. The magnitudes of these runoff reductions varied between storms and showed a high degree of dependence on storm characteristics, particularly the maximum precipitation intensity.en
dc.description.sponsorshipPrimary financial support for this research was granted by the Natural and Man-Made Hazard Mitigation Program of the National Science Foundation (BCS-9307411), with partial support from the Hydrologic Research Laboratory of the National Weather Service (NA57WH0575) and the NASA -EOS project (NAGW2425). The aforementioned support is greatly appreciated.en
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherDepartment of Hydrology and Water Resources, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ)en
dc.relation.ispartofseriesTechnical Reports on Hydrology and Water Resources, No. 97-080en
dc.rightsCopyright © Arizona Board of Regentsen
dc.sourceProvided by the Department of Hydrology and Water Resources.en
dc.titleEFFECTS OF RADAR-ESTIMATED PRECIPITATION UNCERTAINTY ON DIFFERENT RUNOFF-GENERATION MECHANISMSen_US
dc.typetexten
dc.typeTechnical Reporten
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Hydrology & Water Resources, The University of Arizonaen
dc.description.collectioninformationThis title from the Hydrology & Water Resources Technical Reports collection is made available by the Department of Hydrology & Atmospheric Sciences and the University Libraries, University of Arizona. If you have questions about titles in this collection, please contact repository@u.library.arizona.edu.en
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