Hydrologic resource assessment of upper Sabino Creek basin, Pima county, Arizona

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/615769
Title:
Hydrologic resource assessment of upper Sabino Creek basin, Pima county, Arizona
Author:
Peters, Christopher J.; Bales, Roger C.
Affiliation:
Department of Hydrology & Water Resources, The University of Arizona
Publisher:
Department of Hydrology and Water Resources, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ)
Issue Date:
2001-01
Rights:
Copyright © Arizona Board of Regents
Collection Information:
This title from the Hydrology & Water Resources Technical Reports collection is made available by the Department of Hydrology & Atmospheric Sciences and the University Libraries, University of Arizona. If you have questions about titles in this collection, please contact repository@u.library.arizona.edu.
Abstract:
A hydrologic resource assessment was performed for upper Sabino Creek basin, using data from a variety of local, state, and Federal agencies and organizations. Hydrologic fluxes were identified and quantified in order to create a monthly water budget. Snowmelt and rainfall are the major inputs to the watershed. Evapotranspiration accounts for the greatest loss of water. Human consumption and streamflow, while important for regulatory and aesthetic reasons, are relatively minor components of the water budget. Evapotranspiration, precipitation, and groundwater recharge / soil moisture account for the greatest fluxes of water in the basin. Precipitation is the most variable hydrologic process in the study area. Over a 47-year period, the greatest amount of water moving through the system in any one month was 6,300 acre-feet in October of 1983. The month with the lowest movement of water was December 1996, with 400 acre-feet. A comparison of Sabino Creek data with the El Niño Southern Oscillation phenomenon shows a strong correlation with precipitation and streamflow in upper Sabino Creek basin.
Series/Report no.:
Technical Reports on Hydrology and Water Resources, No. 01-020
Sponsors:
This study would not have been possible without the assistance of several individuals. Michael Stanley, Operations Manager of the Mt. Lemon Cooperative Water Company provided us with complete access to his files and records. Special thanks to: Bob Lefevre (U.S. Forest Service, Coronado National Forest), Andrew Wigg (Pima Country Flood Control Distric), Steve Hensel (Coronado National Forest), Gerald Gottfried (U.S.F.S. Rocky Mountain Research Station), and Peter Ffolliott (University of Arizona School of Renewable Natural Resources); all of whom helped make this study possible by sharing data and offering many helpful suggestions. Chuck Dickens, president of Groundwater Resources Consultants, allowed CJP to maintain a flexible schedule and balance the demands of school and employment. Shel Clark and Alan Cuddy of GWRC made suggestions, answered questions, and took the time to read the first draft. We appreciate the assistance provided by other HWR students, particularly Anne Kramer -Huth, Tom Meixner, and Chris Gutmann. Hans Huth was of great assistance with the GIS aspects of this project. Carrie Teague helped prepare the maps. Jessica Novak provided encouragement, support and motivation.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorPeters, Christopher J.en
dc.contributor.authorBales, Roger C.en
dc.date.accessioned2016-07-07T22:43:55Z-
dc.date.available2016-07-07T22:43:55Z-
dc.date.issued2001-01-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/615769-
dc.description.abstractA hydrologic resource assessment was performed for upper Sabino Creek basin, using data from a variety of local, state, and Federal agencies and organizations. Hydrologic fluxes were identified and quantified in order to create a monthly water budget. Snowmelt and rainfall are the major inputs to the watershed. Evapotranspiration accounts for the greatest loss of water. Human consumption and streamflow, while important for regulatory and aesthetic reasons, are relatively minor components of the water budget. Evapotranspiration, precipitation, and groundwater recharge / soil moisture account for the greatest fluxes of water in the basin. Precipitation is the most variable hydrologic process in the study area. Over a 47-year period, the greatest amount of water moving through the system in any one month was 6,300 acre-feet in October of 1983. The month with the lowest movement of water was December 1996, with 400 acre-feet. A comparison of Sabino Creek data with the El Niño Southern Oscillation phenomenon shows a strong correlation with precipitation and streamflow in upper Sabino Creek basin.en
dc.description.sponsorshipThis study would not have been possible without the assistance of several individuals. Michael Stanley, Operations Manager of the Mt. Lemon Cooperative Water Company provided us with complete access to his files and records. Special thanks to: Bob Lefevre (U.S. Forest Service, Coronado National Forest), Andrew Wigg (Pima Country Flood Control Distric), Steve Hensel (Coronado National Forest), Gerald Gottfried (U.S.F.S. Rocky Mountain Research Station), and Peter Ffolliott (University of Arizona School of Renewable Natural Resources); all of whom helped make this study possible by sharing data and offering many helpful suggestions. Chuck Dickens, president of Groundwater Resources Consultants, allowed CJP to maintain a flexible schedule and balance the demands of school and employment. Shel Clark and Alan Cuddy of GWRC made suggestions, answered questions, and took the time to read the first draft. We appreciate the assistance provided by other HWR students, particularly Anne Kramer -Huth, Tom Meixner, and Chris Gutmann. Hans Huth was of great assistance with the GIS aspects of this project. Carrie Teague helped prepare the maps. Jessica Novak provided encouragement, support and motivation.en
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherDepartment of Hydrology and Water Resources, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ)en
dc.relation.ispartofseriesTechnical Reports on Hydrology and Water Resources, No. 01-020en
dc.rightsCopyright © Arizona Board of Regentsen
dc.sourceProvided by the Department of Hydrology and Water Resources.en
dc.titleHydrologic resource assessment of upper Sabino Creek basin, Pima county, Arizonaen_US
dc.typetexten
dc.typeTechnical Reporten
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Hydrology & Water Resources, The University of Arizonaen
dc.description.collectioninformationThis title from the Hydrology & Water Resources Technical Reports collection is made available by the Department of Hydrology & Atmospheric Sciences and the University Libraries, University of Arizona. If you have questions about titles in this collection, please contact repository@u.library.arizona.edu.en
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