Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/615727
Title:
ADVANTAGES OF GENERAL PURPOSE TELEMETRY DATA AND CONTROL SYSTEMS
Author:
Hales, John C.
Affiliation:
Boeing Aerospace Company
Issue Date:
1985-10
Rights:
Copyright © International Foundation for Telemetering
Collection Information:
Proceedings from the International Telemetering Conference are made available by the International Foundation for Telemetering and the University of Arizona Libraries. Visit http://www.telemetry.org/index.php/contact-us if you have questions about items in this collection.
Publisher:
International Foundation for Telemetering
Journal:
International Telemetering Conference Proceedings
Abstract:
A key milestone for every telemetry design is that date when everyone agrees on a definition of the design requirements. Unfortunately, specifications often become obscured as test constraints change, additional requirements are uncovered, test objectives are more clearly defined, and budgets are cut in half. Historically, telemetry designs using technology, hardware, and philosophy that pre-date Christopher Columbus have caused obvious rigidity to the system design and its operation. Once completed, program managers become ruefully aware that these systems are difficult (if not impossible) to modify and are always very costly to change. Telemetry systems available today offer the flexibility necessary to accommodate a frequently changing measurement list. Not only can the measurement list be changed, it can be changed during the course of a test in progress. If requirements expand, hardware may be added. If the test is a non-destructive test, the system can be configured for use on future programs.
Keywords:
Programmable; General Purpose; Telemetry; Control; Data Acquisition
Sponsors:
International Foundation for Telemetering
ISSN:
0884-5123; 0074-9079
Additional Links:
http://www.telemetry.org/

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.titleADVANTAGES OF GENERAL PURPOSE TELEMETRY DATA AND CONTROL SYSTEMSen_US
dc.contributor.authorHales, John C.en
dc.contributor.departmentBoeing Aerospace Companyen
dc.date.issued1985-10-
dc.rightsCopyright © International Foundation for Telemeteringen
dc.description.collectioninformationProceedings from the International Telemetering Conference are made available by the International Foundation for Telemetering and the University of Arizona Libraries. Visit http://www.telemetry.org/index.php/contact-us if you have questions about items in this collection.en
dc.publisherInternational Foundation for Telemeteringen
dc.description.abstractA key milestone for every telemetry design is that date when everyone agrees on a definition of the design requirements. Unfortunately, specifications often become obscured as test constraints change, additional requirements are uncovered, test objectives are more clearly defined, and budgets are cut in half. Historically, telemetry designs using technology, hardware, and philosophy that pre-date Christopher Columbus have caused obvious rigidity to the system design and its operation. Once completed, program managers become ruefully aware that these systems are difficult (if not impossible) to modify and are always very costly to change. Telemetry systems available today offer the flexibility necessary to accommodate a frequently changing measurement list. Not only can the measurement list be changed, it can be changed during the course of a test in progress. If requirements expand, hardware may be added. If the test is a non-destructive test, the system can be configured for use on future programs.en
dc.subjectProgrammableen
dc.subjectGeneral Purposeen
dc.subjectTelemetryen
dc.subjectControlen
dc.subjectData Acquisitionen
dc.description.sponsorshipInternational Foundation for Telemeteringen
dc.identifier.issn0884-5123-
dc.identifier.issn0074-9079-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/615727-
dc.identifier.journalInternational Telemetering Conference Proceedingsen
dc.typetexten
dc.typeProceedingsen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.telemetry.org/en
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