The Case for Using Evidence-Based Guidelines in Setting Hospital and Public Health Policy

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/615648
Title:
The Case for Using Evidence-Based Guidelines in Setting Hospital and Public Health Policy
Author:
Francis, Ross H.; Mudery, Jordan A.; Tran, Phi; Howe, Carol; Jacob, Abraham
Affiliation:
University of Arizona
Issue Date:
2016-03-29
Publisher:
Frontiers Media
Citation:
The Case for Using Evidence-Based Guidelines in Setting Hospital and Public Health Policy 2016, 3 Frontiers in Surgery
Journal:
Frontiers in Surgery
Rights:
Copyright © 2016 Francis, Mudery, Tran, Howe and Jacob. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY).
Collection Information:
This item from the UA Faculty Publications collection is made available by the University of Arizona with support from the University of Arizona Libraries. If you have questions, please contact us at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.
Abstract:
OBJECTIVE: Hospital systems and regulating agencies enforce strict guidelines barring personal items from entering the operating room (OR) - touting surgical site infections (SSIs) and patient safety as the rationale. We sought to determine whether or not evidence supporting this recommendation exists by reviewing available literature. BACKGROUND DATA: Rules and guidelines that are not evidence based may lead to increased hospital expenses and limitations on healthcare provider autonomy. METHODS: PubMed, Embase, Scopus, Cochrane Library, Web of Science, and CINAHL were searched in order to find articles that correlated personal items in the OR to documented SSIs. Articles that satisfied the following criteria were included: (1) studies looking at personal items in the OR, such as handbags, purses, badges, pagers, backpacks, jewelry phones, and eyeglasses, but not just OR equipment; and (2) the primary outcome measure was infection at the surgical site. RESULTS: Seventeen articles met inclusion criteria and were evaluated. Of the 17, the majority did not determine if personal items increased risk for SSIs. Only one article examined the correlation between a personal item near the operative site and SSI, concluding that wedding rings worn in the OR had no impact on SSIs. Most studies examined colonization rates on personal items as potential infection risk; however, no personal items were causally linked to SSI in any of these studies. CONCLUSION: There is no objective evidence to suggest that personal items in the OR increase risk for SSIs.
ISSN:
2296-875X
DOI:
10.3389/fsurg.2016.00020
Keywords:
evidence-based medicine; operating room; personal items; public health policy; surgical site infections
Version:
Final published version
Additional Links:
http://journal.frontiersin.org/Article/10.3389/fsurg.2016.00020/abstract

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorFrancis, Ross H.en
dc.contributor.authorMudery, Jordan A.en
dc.contributor.authorTran, Phien
dc.contributor.authorHowe, Carolen
dc.contributor.authorJacob, Abrahamen
dc.date.accessioned2016-07-06T22:33:52Z-
dc.date.available2016-07-06T22:33:52Z-
dc.date.issued2016-03-29-
dc.identifier.citationThe Case for Using Evidence-Based Guidelines in Setting Hospital and Public Health Policy 2016, 3 Frontiers in Surgeryen
dc.identifier.issn2296-875X-
dc.identifier.doi10.3389/fsurg.2016.00020-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/615648-
dc.description.abstractOBJECTIVE: Hospital systems and regulating agencies enforce strict guidelines barring personal items from entering the operating room (OR) - touting surgical site infections (SSIs) and patient safety as the rationale. We sought to determine whether or not evidence supporting this recommendation exists by reviewing available literature. BACKGROUND DATA: Rules and guidelines that are not evidence based may lead to increased hospital expenses and limitations on healthcare provider autonomy. METHODS: PubMed, Embase, Scopus, Cochrane Library, Web of Science, and CINAHL were searched in order to find articles that correlated personal items in the OR to documented SSIs. Articles that satisfied the following criteria were included: (1) studies looking at personal items in the OR, such as handbags, purses, badges, pagers, backpacks, jewelry phones, and eyeglasses, but not just OR equipment; and (2) the primary outcome measure was infection at the surgical site. RESULTS: Seventeen articles met inclusion criteria and were evaluated. Of the 17, the majority did not determine if personal items increased risk for SSIs. Only one article examined the correlation between a personal item near the operative site and SSI, concluding that wedding rings worn in the OR had no impact on SSIs. Most studies examined colonization rates on personal items as potential infection risk; however, no personal items were causally linked to SSI in any of these studies. CONCLUSION: There is no objective evidence to suggest that personal items in the OR increase risk for SSIs.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherFrontiers Mediaen
dc.relation.urlhttp://journal.frontiersin.org/Article/10.3389/fsurg.2016.00020/abstracten
dc.rightsCopyright © 2016 Francis, Mudery, Tran, Howe and Jacob. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY).en
dc.subjectevidence-based medicineen
dc.subjectoperating roomen
dc.subjectpersonal itemsen
dc.subjectpublic health policyen
dc.subjectsurgical site infectionsen
dc.titleThe Case for Using Evidence-Based Guidelines in Setting Hospital and Public Health Policyen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Arizonaen
dc.identifier.journalFrontiers in Surgeryen
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item from the UA Faculty Publications collection is made available by the University of Arizona with support from the University of Arizona Libraries. If you have questions, please contact us at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.en
dc.eprint.versionFinal published versionen
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