Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/615262
Title:
Telemetry Bus Linkage with a High-Speed Ring Architecture: An Approach Analysis
Author:
Nicolo, John M.
Affiliation:
Aydin Monitor Systems
Issue Date:
1987-10
Rights:
Copyright © International Foundation for Telemetering
Collection Information:
Proceedings from the International Telemetering Conference are made available by the International Foundation for Telemetering and the University of Arizona Libraries. Visit http://www.telemetry.org/index.php/contact-us if you have questions about items in this collection.
Publisher:
International Foundation for Telemetering
Journal:
International Telemetering Conference Proceedings
Abstract:
The growing complexity of space vehicle, aircraft, and missile test data analysis requiring larger data volumes and higher data rates, in conjunction with real-time analysis and display, calls for a new approach in telemetry system bus architecture. To meet these needs AMS developed the Mercury Bus, and a high-speed ring architecture capable of linking up to 7 Mercury Busses together without reducing targeted bus bandwidth of 6 MWPS. The Mercury Bus is a 48 bit parallel bus consisting of 32 data bits, and 16 "token" or address bits. It supports setup or real-time transfers between multiple master/slave modules within a chassis. The ring architecture consists of Bus Arbitrator, Repeater, Terminator Modules (BAT's) connected together by circular unidirectional read and write pipelines. The BAT arbitrates bus mastership, repeat's intra-chassis transfers and provides signal termination for the Mercury Bus. The pipelines relay bus transfers to successive chassis within the ring. This architecture currently supports up to 7 chassis or 112 modules per system. The ring architecture has met and exceeds initial design criteria with transfer rates measured in excess of 8 million words-per-second. It performs sustained high-rate data transfers while maintaining the data integrity and reliability associated with real-time telemetry. This architecture is well suited for systems with multiple input streams and high data processing requirements. Overall performance is attributed to the low noise characteristics of a controlled impedance backplane; implementation of module front end standardized bus interfaces; and the Bus Arbitrator, Repeater, Terminator module.
Sponsors:
International Foundation for Telemetering
ISSN:
0884-5123; 0074-9079
Additional Links:
http://www.telemetry.org/

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.titleTelemetry Bus Linkage with a High-Speed Ring Architecture: An Approach Analysisen_US
dc.contributor.authorNicolo, John M.en
dc.contributor.departmentAydin Monitor Systemsen
dc.date.issued1987-10-
dc.rightsCopyright © International Foundation for Telemeteringen
dc.description.collectioninformationProceedings from the International Telemetering Conference are made available by the International Foundation for Telemetering and the University of Arizona Libraries. Visit http://www.telemetry.org/index.php/contact-us if you have questions about items in this collection.en
dc.publisherInternational Foundation for Telemeteringen
dc.description.abstractThe growing complexity of space vehicle, aircraft, and missile test data analysis requiring larger data volumes and higher data rates, in conjunction with real-time analysis and display, calls for a new approach in telemetry system bus architecture. To meet these needs AMS developed the Mercury Bus, and a high-speed ring architecture capable of linking up to 7 Mercury Busses together without reducing targeted bus bandwidth of 6 MWPS. The Mercury Bus is a 48 bit parallel bus consisting of 32 data bits, and 16 "token" or address bits. It supports setup or real-time transfers between multiple master/slave modules within a chassis. The ring architecture consists of Bus Arbitrator, Repeater, Terminator Modules (BAT's) connected together by circular unidirectional read and write pipelines. The BAT arbitrates bus mastership, repeat's intra-chassis transfers and provides signal termination for the Mercury Bus. The pipelines relay bus transfers to successive chassis within the ring. This architecture currently supports up to 7 chassis or 112 modules per system. The ring architecture has met and exceeds initial design criteria with transfer rates measured in excess of 8 million words-per-second. It performs sustained high-rate data transfers while maintaining the data integrity and reliability associated with real-time telemetry. This architecture is well suited for systems with multiple input streams and high data processing requirements. Overall performance is attributed to the low noise characteristics of a controlled impedance backplane; implementation of module front end standardized bus interfaces; and the Bus Arbitrator, Repeater, Terminator module.en
dc.description.sponsorshipInternational Foundation for Telemeteringen
dc.identifier.issn0884-5123-
dc.identifier.issn0074-9079-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/615262-
dc.identifier.journalInternational Telemetering Conference Proceedingsen
dc.typetexten
dc.typeProceedingsen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.telemetry.org/en
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