Integrating Library Instruction Into Learning Communities: A L.E.A.P Toward Innovation

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/615188
Title:
Integrating Library Instruction Into Learning Communities: A L.E.A.P Toward Innovation
Author:
Cheney, Deborah; Sheehy, Helen
Affiliation:
The Pennsylvania State University
Issue Date:
23-Apr-1998
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author.
Collection Information:
This item is part of the Living the Future 8 collection. For more information about items in this collection, please email repository@u.library.arizona.edu.
Abstract:
Learning communities can be used to enhance a student's understanding of a subject discipline, the writing process, and to improve research skills. One such model integrated three courses into a single syllabus called the Political Inquiry and Writing Pride offered to incoming freshmen as part of the Learning Edge Academic Program (LEAP). The LEAP program encourages active and collaborative learning, and the opportunity to integrate library skills into each Pride's curriculum. The pilot program revealed that the concept of a community may be the appropriate model for enhancing the learning and teaching process because it takes the courses, the faculty, and the librarians out of isolation and places them in purposeful juxtaposition to each other. However, if such learning communities are to grow and thrive universities and libraries must improve the teaching skills of both librarians and faculty by developing a greater part of their resources to such efforts. Nevertheless, the possibility for improving information literacy through such a learning community is great.
Identifiers:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/615188
Description:
Conference proceedings from the Living the Future Conference, April 21-24, 1998, University of Arizona Libraries, Tucson, AZ.
Keywords:
changes for libraries; academic libraries; innovation in libraries

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.titleIntegrating Library Instruction Into Learning Communities: A L.E.A.P Toward Innovationen_US
dc.contributor.authorCheney, Deborahen
dc.contributor.authorSheehy, Helenen
dc.contributor.departmentThe Pennsylvania State Universityen
dc.date.issued1998-04-23-
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author.en
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item is part of the Living the Future 8 collection. For more information about items in this collection, please email repository@u.library.arizona.edu.en
dc.description.abstractLearning communities can be used to enhance a student's understanding of a subject discipline, the writing process, and to improve research skills. One such model integrated three courses into a single syllabus called the Political Inquiry and Writing Pride offered to incoming freshmen as part of the Learning Edge Academic Program (LEAP). The LEAP program encourages active and collaborative learning, and the opportunity to integrate library skills into each Pride's curriculum. The pilot program revealed that the concept of a community may be the appropriate model for enhancing the learning and teaching process because it takes the courses, the faculty, and the librarians out of isolation and places them in purposeful juxtaposition to each other. However, if such learning communities are to grow and thrive universities and libraries must improve the teaching skills of both librarians and faculty by developing a greater part of their resources to such efforts. Nevertheless, the possibility for improving information literacy through such a learning community is great.en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/615188-
dc.descriptionConference proceedings from the Living the Future Conference, April 21-24, 1998, University of Arizona Libraries, Tucson, AZ.en
dc.subjectchanges for librariesen
dc.subjectacademic librariesen
dc.subjectinnovation in librariesen
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