The extended trajectory of hippocampal development: Implications for early memory development and disorder

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/615110
Title:
The extended trajectory of hippocampal development: Implications for early memory development and disorder
Author:
Gómez, Rebecca L.; Edgin, Jamie O.
Affiliation:
Univ Arizona
Issue Date:
2016-04
Publisher:
ELSEVIER SCI LTD
Citation:
The extended trajectory of hippocampal development: Implications for early memory development and disorder 2016, 18:57 Developmental Cognitive Neuroscience
Journal:
Developmental Cognitive Neuroscience
Rights:
© 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd. This is an open access article under the CC BY-NC-ND license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/).
Collection Information:
This item from the UA Faculty Publications collection is made available by the University of Arizona with support from the University of Arizona Libraries. If you have questions, please contact us at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.
Abstract:
Hippocampus has an extended developmental trajectory, with refinements occurring in the trisynaptic circuit until adolescence. While structural change should suggest a protracted course in behavior, some studies find evidence of precocious hippocampal development in the first postnatal year and continuity in memory processes beyond. However, a number of memory functions, including binding and relational inference, can be cortically supported. Evidence from the animal literature suggests that tasks often associated with hippocampus (visual paired comparison, binding of a visuomotor response) can be mediated by structures external to hippocampus. Thus, a complete examination of memory development will have to rule out cortex as a source of early memory competency. We propose that early memory must show properties associated with full function of the trisynaptic circuit to reflect "adult-like" memory function, mainly (1) rapid encoding of contextual details of overlapping patterns, and (2) retention of these details over sleep-dependent delays. A wealth of evidence suggests that these functions are not apparent until 18-24 months, with behavioral discontinuities reflecting shifts in the neural structures subserving memory beginning approximately at this point in development. We discuss the implications of these observations for theories of memory and for identifying and measuring memory function in populations with typical and atypical hippocampal function. (C) 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.
ISSN:
18789293
DOI:
10.1016/j.dcn.2015.08.009
Keywords:
Memory development; Hippocampus; Cortex; Sleep; Atypical populations
Version:
Final published version
Sponsors:
Work on this paper was supported by the National Science Foundation (BCS-1052887) and the National Institutes of Health (R03HD073417) to RLG. The Lumind Research Down Syndrome Foundation, the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation (OPP1119381), Fondation Jerome Lejeune, the National Institutes of Health (R01HD07434601A1), and the Arizona Alzheimer's Consortium funded JE.
Additional Links:
http://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S1878929315300232

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorGómez, Rebecca L.en
dc.contributor.authorEdgin, Jamie O.en
dc.date.accessioned2016-06-30T02:04:44Z-
dc.date.available2016-06-30T02:04:44Z-
dc.date.issued2016-04-
dc.identifier.citationThe extended trajectory of hippocampal development: Implications for early memory development and disorder 2016, 18:57 Developmental Cognitive Neuroscienceen
dc.identifier.issn18789293-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.dcn.2015.08.009-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/615110-
dc.description.abstractHippocampus has an extended developmental trajectory, with refinements occurring in the trisynaptic circuit until adolescence. While structural change should suggest a protracted course in behavior, some studies find evidence of precocious hippocampal development in the first postnatal year and continuity in memory processes beyond. However, a number of memory functions, including binding and relational inference, can be cortically supported. Evidence from the animal literature suggests that tasks often associated with hippocampus (visual paired comparison, binding of a visuomotor response) can be mediated by structures external to hippocampus. Thus, a complete examination of memory development will have to rule out cortex as a source of early memory competency. We propose that early memory must show properties associated with full function of the trisynaptic circuit to reflect "adult-like" memory function, mainly (1) rapid encoding of contextual details of overlapping patterns, and (2) retention of these details over sleep-dependent delays. A wealth of evidence suggests that these functions are not apparent until 18-24 months, with behavioral discontinuities reflecting shifts in the neural structures subserving memory beginning approximately at this point in development. We discuss the implications of these observations for theories of memory and for identifying and measuring memory function in populations with typical and atypical hippocampal function. (C) 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.en
dc.description.sponsorshipWork on this paper was supported by the National Science Foundation (BCS-1052887) and the National Institutes of Health (R03HD073417) to RLG. The Lumind Research Down Syndrome Foundation, the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation (OPP1119381), Fondation Jerome Lejeune, the National Institutes of Health (R01HD07434601A1), and the Arizona Alzheimer's Consortium funded JE.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherELSEVIER SCI LTDen
dc.relation.urlhttp://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S1878929315300232en
dc.rights© 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd. This is an open access article under the CC BY-NC-ND license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/).en
dc.subjectMemory developmenten
dc.subjectHippocampusen
dc.subjectCortexen
dc.subjectSleepen
dc.subjectAtypical populationsen
dc.titleThe extended trajectory of hippocampal development: Implications for early memory development and disorderen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniv Arizonaen
dc.identifier.journalDevelopmental Cognitive Neuroscienceen
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item from the UA Faculty Publications collection is made available by the University of Arizona with support from the University of Arizona Libraries. If you have questions, please contact us at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.en
dc.eprint.versionFinal published versionen
All Items in UA Campus Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.