Population genetic structure and post-LGM expansion of the plant bug Nesidiocoris tenuis (Hemiptera: Miridae) in China

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/614987
Title:
Population genetic structure and post-LGM expansion of the plant bug Nesidiocoris tenuis (Hemiptera: Miridae) in China
Author:
Xun, Huaizhu; Li, Hu; Li, Shujuan; Wei, Shujun; Zhang, Lijuan; Song, Fan; Jiang, Pei; Yang, Hailin; Han, Fei; Cai, Wanzhi
Affiliation:
Univ Arizona, Maricopa Agr Ctr
Issue Date:
2016-05-27
Publisher:
NATURE PUBLISHING GROUP
Citation:
Population genetic structure and post-LGM expansion of the plant bug Nesidiocoris tenuis (Hemiptera: Miridae) in China 2016, 6:26755 Scientific Reports
Journal:
Scientific Reports
Rights:
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.
Collection Information:
This item from the UA Faculty Publications collection is made available by the University of Arizona with support from the University of Arizona Libraries. If you have questions, please contact us at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.
Abstract:
The plant bug, Nesidiocoris tenuis (Hemiptera: Miridae), is one of the most thermophilous dicyphines in agroecosystems and is widely distributed in China. Little is known regarding the genetic structure of N. tenuis and the effect of historical climatic fluctuations on N. tenuis populations. We analyzed partial sequences of three mitochondrial protein-coding genes (COI, ND2 and CytB) and nuclear genes (5.8S, ITS2 and 28S) for 516 specimens collected from 37 localities across China. Analyses of the combined mitochondrial dataset indicated that the Southwestern China group (SWC) was significantly differentiated from the remaining populations, other Chinese group (OC). Asymmetric migration and high level of gene flow across a long distance within the OC group was detected. The long-distance dispersal of N. tenuis might be affected by air currents and human interference. Both the neutrality tests and mismatch distributions revealed the occurrence of historical population expansion. Bayesian skyline plot analyses with two different substitution rates indicated that N. tenuis might follow the post-LGM (the Last Glacial Maximum) expansion pattern for temperate species. Pleistocene climatic fluctuation, complicated topography and anthropogenic factors, along with other ecological factors (e.g. temperature and air current) might have accounted for the current population structure of N. tenuis.
ISSN:
2045-2322
DOI:
10.1038/srep26755
Version:
Final published version
Sponsors:
National Basic Research Program of China [2013CB127600]; National Key Technology R & D Program of the Ministry of Science and Technology [2012BAD19B00]; Special Fund for Scientific Research [2012FY111100]; National Natural Science Foundation of China [31372229, 31420103902, 31401991]
Additional Links:
http://www.nature.com/articles/srep26755

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorXun, Huaizhuen
dc.contributor.authorLi, Huen
dc.contributor.authorLi, Shujuanen
dc.contributor.authorWei, Shujunen
dc.contributor.authorZhang, Lijuanen
dc.contributor.authorSong, Fanen
dc.contributor.authorJiang, Peien
dc.contributor.authorYang, Hailinen
dc.contributor.authorHan, Feien
dc.contributor.authorCai, Wanzhien
dc.date.accessioned2016-06-29T01:18:34Z-
dc.date.available2016-06-29T01:18:34Z-
dc.date.issued2016-05-27-
dc.identifier.citationPopulation genetic structure and post-LGM expansion of the plant bug Nesidiocoris tenuis (Hemiptera: Miridae) in China 2016, 6:26755 Scientific Reportsen
dc.identifier.issn2045-2322-
dc.identifier.doi10.1038/srep26755-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/614987-
dc.description.abstractThe plant bug, Nesidiocoris tenuis (Hemiptera: Miridae), is one of the most thermophilous dicyphines in agroecosystems and is widely distributed in China. Little is known regarding the genetic structure of N. tenuis and the effect of historical climatic fluctuations on N. tenuis populations. We analyzed partial sequences of three mitochondrial protein-coding genes (COI, ND2 and CytB) and nuclear genes (5.8S, ITS2 and 28S) for 516 specimens collected from 37 localities across China. Analyses of the combined mitochondrial dataset indicated that the Southwestern China group (SWC) was significantly differentiated from the remaining populations, other Chinese group (OC). Asymmetric migration and high level of gene flow across a long distance within the OC group was detected. The long-distance dispersal of N. tenuis might be affected by air currents and human interference. Both the neutrality tests and mismatch distributions revealed the occurrence of historical population expansion. Bayesian skyline plot analyses with two different substitution rates indicated that N. tenuis might follow the post-LGM (the Last Glacial Maximum) expansion pattern for temperate species. Pleistocene climatic fluctuation, complicated topography and anthropogenic factors, along with other ecological factors (e.g. temperature and air current) might have accounted for the current population structure of N. tenuis.en
dc.description.sponsorshipNational Basic Research Program of China [2013CB127600]; National Key Technology R & D Program of the Ministry of Science and Technology [2012BAD19B00]; Special Fund for Scientific Research [2012FY111100]; National Natural Science Foundation of China [31372229, 31420103902, 31401991]en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherNATURE PUBLISHING GROUPen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.nature.com/articles/srep26755en
dc.rightsThis work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.en
dc.titlePopulation genetic structure and post-LGM expansion of the plant bug Nesidiocoris tenuis (Hemiptera: Miridae) in Chinaen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniv Arizona, Maricopa Agr Ctren
dc.identifier.journalScientific Reportsen
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item from the UA Faculty Publications collection is made available by the University of Arizona with support from the University of Arizona Libraries. If you have questions, please contact us at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.en
dc.eprint.versionFinal published versionen
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