Hippocampal CA1 Ripples as Inhibitory Transients

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/614980
Title:
Hippocampal CA1 Ripples as Inhibitory Transients
Author:
Malerba, Paola ( 0000-0002-8733-899X ) ; Krishnan, Giri P; Fellous, Jean-Marc; Bazhenov, Maxim
Affiliation:
Univ Arizona, Dept Psychol
Issue Date:
2016-04-19
Publisher:
Public Library of Science
Citation:
Hippocampal CA1 Ripples as Inhibitory Transients 2016, 12 (4):e1004880 PLOS Computational Biology
Journal:
PLOS Computational Biology
Rights:
© 2016 Malerba et al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.
Collection Information:
This item from the UA Faculty Publications collection is made available by the University of Arizona with support from the University of Arizona Libraries. If you have questions, please contact us at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.
Abstract:
Memories are stored and consolidated as a result of a dialogue between the hippocampus and cortex during sleep. Neurons active during behavior reactivate in both structures during sleep, in conjunction with characteristic brain oscillations that may form the neural substrate of memory consolidation. In the hippocampus, replay occurs within sharp wave-ripples: short bouts of high-frequency activity in area CA1 caused by excitatory activation from area CA3. In this work, we develop a computational model of ripple generation, motivated by in vivo rat data showing that ripples have a broad frequency distribution, exponential inter-arrival times and yet highly non-variable durations. Our study predicts that ripples are not persistent oscillations but result from a transient network behavior, induced by input from CA3, in which the high frequency synchronous firing of perisomatic interneurons does not depend on the time scale of synaptic inhibition. We found that noise-induced loss of synchrony among CA1 interneurons dynamically constrains individual ripple duration. Our study proposes a novel mechanism of hippocampal ripple generation consistent with a broad range of experimental data, and highlights the role of noise in regulating the duration of input-driven oscillatory spiking in an inhibitory network.
ISSN:
1553-7358
DOI:
10.1371/journal.pcbi.1004880
Version:
Final published version
Sponsors:
Office of Naval Research grant (Multi University Research Initiative) [N000141310672]
Additional Links:
http://dx.plos.org/10.1371/journal.pcbi.1004880

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorMalerba, Paolaen
dc.contributor.authorKrishnan, Giri Pen
dc.contributor.authorFellous, Jean-Marcen
dc.contributor.authorBazhenov, Maximen
dc.date.accessioned2016-06-29T00:45:53Z-
dc.date.available2016-06-29T00:45:53Z-
dc.date.issued2016-04-19-
dc.identifier.citationHippocampal CA1 Ripples as Inhibitory Transients 2016, 12 (4):e1004880 PLOS Computational Biologyen
dc.identifier.issn1553-7358-
dc.identifier.doi10.1371/journal.pcbi.1004880-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/614980-
dc.description.abstractMemories are stored and consolidated as a result of a dialogue between the hippocampus and cortex during sleep. Neurons active during behavior reactivate in both structures during sleep, in conjunction with characteristic brain oscillations that may form the neural substrate of memory consolidation. In the hippocampus, replay occurs within sharp wave-ripples: short bouts of high-frequency activity in area CA1 caused by excitatory activation from area CA3. In this work, we develop a computational model of ripple generation, motivated by in vivo rat data showing that ripples have a broad frequency distribution, exponential inter-arrival times and yet highly non-variable durations. Our study predicts that ripples are not persistent oscillations but result from a transient network behavior, induced by input from CA3, in which the high frequency synchronous firing of perisomatic interneurons does not depend on the time scale of synaptic inhibition. We found that noise-induced loss of synchrony among CA1 interneurons dynamically constrains individual ripple duration. Our study proposes a novel mechanism of hippocampal ripple generation consistent with a broad range of experimental data, and highlights the role of noise in regulating the duration of input-driven oscillatory spiking in an inhibitory network.en
dc.description.sponsorshipOffice of Naval Research grant (Multi University Research Initiative) [N000141310672]en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherPublic Library of Scienceen
dc.relation.urlhttp://dx.plos.org/10.1371/journal.pcbi.1004880en
dc.rights© 2016 Malerba et al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.en
dc.titleHippocampal CA1 Ripples as Inhibitory Transientsen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniv Arizona, Dept Psycholen
dc.identifier.journalPLOS Computational Biologyen
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item from the UA Faculty Publications collection is made available by the University of Arizona with support from the University of Arizona Libraries. If you have questions, please contact us at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.en
dc.eprint.versionFinal published versionen
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