The role of child care in supporting the emotion regulatory needs of maltreated infants and toddlers

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/614974
Title:
The role of child care in supporting the emotion regulatory needs of maltreated infants and toddlers
Author:
Mortensen, Jennifer A.; Barnett, Melissa A.
Affiliation:
Univ Arizona, Family Studies & Human Dev
Issue Date:
2016-05
Publisher:
PERGAMON-ELSEVIER SCIENCE LTD
Citation:
The role of child care in supporting the emotion regulatory needs of maltreated infants and toddlers 2016, 64:73 Children and Youth Services Review
Journal:
Children and Youth Services Review
Rights:
© 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
Collection Information:
This item from the UA Faculty Publications collection is made available by the University of Arizona with support from the University of Arizona Libraries. If you have questions, please contact us at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.
Abstract:
Infants and toddlers who experience physical abuse and/or neglect are at a severe risk for disruptions to emotion regulation. Recent prevention and treatment efforts have highlighted center-based child care as an important setting for providing support to the needs of these children, as child care centers are already an existing point of entry for reaching high-risk families. Guided by ecological theory, this review draws on the maltreatment and child care literatures to consider the opportunity for child care centers, specifically teacher-child interactions within the classroom, to support the unique regulatory needs of maltreated infants and toddlers. Existing research on the effects of child care for children facing other types of risk, as well as research with maltreated preschool children, provides a foundation for considering the role child care may play for infants and toddlers, whose emotion regulation skills are just emerging. More research is needed regarding teachers' roles in facilitating effective emotional experiences in the classroom that meet the unique needs of maltreated children. Additionally, early childhood teacher training that focuses on infant/toddler mental health and a trauma-informed perspective of care, as well as structuring child care centers as communities of support for high risk families, all may aid child care centers in better serving this vulnerable population. (C) 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
Note:
Publisher version available online 10 March 2016. 36 month embargo for author's post-print.
ISSN:
01907409
DOI:
10.1016/j.childyouth.2016.03.004
Keywords:
Maltreatment; Infancy; Emotion regulation; Child care
Version:
Final accepted manuscript
Sponsors:
This work was supported by a generous grant from the Doris Duke Fellowship for the Promotion of Child Well-Being.
Additional Links:
http://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0190740916300755

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorMortensen, Jennifer A.en
dc.contributor.authorBarnett, Melissa A.en
dc.date.accessioned2016-06-28T23:34:24Z-
dc.date.available2016-06-28T23:34:24Z-
dc.date.issued2016-05-
dc.identifier.citationThe role of child care in supporting the emotion regulatory needs of maltreated infants and toddlers 2016, 64:73 Children and Youth Services Reviewen
dc.identifier.issn01907409-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.childyouth.2016.03.004-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/614974-
dc.description.abstractInfants and toddlers who experience physical abuse and/or neglect are at a severe risk for disruptions to emotion regulation. Recent prevention and treatment efforts have highlighted center-based child care as an important setting for providing support to the needs of these children, as child care centers are already an existing point of entry for reaching high-risk families. Guided by ecological theory, this review draws on the maltreatment and child care literatures to consider the opportunity for child care centers, specifically teacher-child interactions within the classroom, to support the unique regulatory needs of maltreated infants and toddlers. Existing research on the effects of child care for children facing other types of risk, as well as research with maltreated preschool children, provides a foundation for considering the role child care may play for infants and toddlers, whose emotion regulation skills are just emerging. More research is needed regarding teachers' roles in facilitating effective emotional experiences in the classroom that meet the unique needs of maltreated children. Additionally, early childhood teacher training that focuses on infant/toddler mental health and a trauma-informed perspective of care, as well as structuring child care centers as communities of support for high risk families, all may aid child care centers in better serving this vulnerable population. (C) 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.en
dc.description.sponsorshipThis work was supported by a generous grant from the Doris Duke Fellowship for the Promotion of Child Well-Being.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherPERGAMON-ELSEVIER SCIENCE LTDen
dc.relation.urlhttp://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0190740916300755en
dc.rights© 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.en
dc.subjectMaltreatmenten
dc.subjectInfancyen
dc.subjectEmotion regulationen
dc.subjectChild careen
dc.titleThe role of child care in supporting the emotion regulatory needs of maltreated infants and toddlersen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniv Arizona, Family Studies & Human Deven
dc.identifier.journalChildren and Youth Services Reviewen
dc.description.notePublisher version available online 10 March 2016. 36 month embargo for author's post-print.en
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item from the UA Faculty Publications collection is made available by the University of Arizona with support from the University of Arizona Libraries. If you have questions, please contact us at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.en
dc.eprint.versionFinal accepted manuscripten
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