South Pacific hydrologic and cyclone variability during the last 3000 years

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/614773
Title:
South Pacific hydrologic and cyclone variability during the last 3000 years
Author:
Toomey, Michael R.; Donnelly, Jeffrey P.; Tierney, Jessica E.
Affiliation:
Univ Arizona, Dept Geosci
Issue Date:
2016-04-18
Publisher:
AMER GEOPHYSICAL UNION
Citation:
Toomey,M.R., J.P.Donnelly,and J. E. Tierney (2016), South Pacific hydrologic and cyclone variability during the last 3000 years, Paleoceanography, 31, 491–504, doi:10.1002/2015PA002870.
Journal:
Paleoceanography
Rights:
©2016. American Geophysical Union. All Rights Reserved.
Collection Information:
This item from the UA Faculty Publications collection is made available by the University of Arizona with support from the University of Arizona Libraries. If you have questions, please contact us at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.
Abstract:
Major excursions in the position of the South Pacific Convergence Zone (SPCZ) and/or changes in its intensity are thought to drive tropical cyclone (TC) and precipitation variability across much of the central South Pacific. A lack of conventional sites typically used for multimillennial proxy reconstructions has limited efforts to extend observational rainfall/TC data sets and our ability to fully assess the risks posed to central Pacific islands by future changes in fresh water availability or the frequency of storm landfalls. Here we use the sedimentary record of Apu Bay, offshore the island of Tahaa, French Polynesia, to explore the relationship between SPCZ position/intensity and tropical cyclone overwash, resolved at decadal time scales, since 3200years B.P. Changes in orbital precession and Pacific sea surface temperatures best explain evidence for a coordinated pattern of rainfall variability at Tahaa and across the Pacific over the late Holocene. Our companion record of tropical cyclone activity from Tahaa suggests major storm activity was higher between 2600-1500years B.P., when decadal scale SPCZ variability may also have been stronger. A transition to lower storm frequency and a shift or expansion of the SPCZ toward French Polynesia around 1000years B.P. may have prompted Polynesian migration into the central Pacific.
Note:
Publisher's version/PDF must be used in Institutional Repository 6 months after publication.
ISSN:
08838305
DOI:
10.1002/2015PA002870
Keywords:
cyclone; rainfall; Polynesia; runoff
Version:
Final published version
Additional Links:
http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2015PA002870

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorToomey, Michael R.en
dc.contributor.authorDonnelly, Jeffrey P.en
dc.contributor.authorTierney, Jessica E.en
dc.date.accessioned2016-06-25T01:32:51Z-
dc.date.available2016-06-25T01:32:51Z-
dc.date.issued2016-04-18-
dc.identifier.citationToomey,M.R., J.P.Donnelly,and J. E. Tierney (2016), South Pacific hydrologic and cyclone variability during the last 3000 years, Paleoceanography, 31, 491–504, doi:10.1002/2015PA002870.en
dc.identifier.issn08838305-
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/2015PA002870-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/614773-
dc.description.abstractMajor excursions in the position of the South Pacific Convergence Zone (SPCZ) and/or changes in its intensity are thought to drive tropical cyclone (TC) and precipitation variability across much of the central South Pacific. A lack of conventional sites typically used for multimillennial proxy reconstructions has limited efforts to extend observational rainfall/TC data sets and our ability to fully assess the risks posed to central Pacific islands by future changes in fresh water availability or the frequency of storm landfalls. Here we use the sedimentary record of Apu Bay, offshore the island of Tahaa, French Polynesia, to explore the relationship between SPCZ position/intensity and tropical cyclone overwash, resolved at decadal time scales, since 3200years B.P. Changes in orbital precession and Pacific sea surface temperatures best explain evidence for a coordinated pattern of rainfall variability at Tahaa and across the Pacific over the late Holocene. Our companion record of tropical cyclone activity from Tahaa suggests major storm activity was higher between 2600-1500years B.P., when decadal scale SPCZ variability may also have been stronger. A transition to lower storm frequency and a shift or expansion of the SPCZ toward French Polynesia around 1000years B.P. may have prompted Polynesian migration into the central Pacific.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherAMER GEOPHYSICAL UNIONen
dc.relation.urlhttp://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2015PA002870en
dc.rights©2016. American Geophysical Union. All Rights Reserved.en
dc.subjectcycloneen
dc.subjectrainfallen
dc.subjectPolynesiaen
dc.subjectrunoffen
dc.titleSouth Pacific hydrologic and cyclone variability during the last 3000 yearsen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniv Arizona, Dept Geoscien
dc.identifier.journalPaleoceanographyen
dc.description.notePublisher's version/PDF must be used in Institutional Repository 6 months after publication.en
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item from the UA Faculty Publications collection is made available by the University of Arizona with support from the University of Arizona Libraries. If you have questions, please contact us at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.en
dc.eprint.versionFinal published versionen
dc.contributor.institutionJackson School of Geosciences; University of Texas at Austin; Austin Texas USA-
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Geology and Geophysics; Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution; Woods Hole Massachusetts USA-
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Geology and Geophysics; Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution; Woods Hole Massachusetts USA-
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