Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/614762
Title:
Pyrolytic carbon coated black silicon
Author:
Shah, Ali; Stenberg, Petri; Karvonen, Lasse; Ali, Rizwan; Honkanen, Seppo; Lipsanen, Harri; Peyghambarian, N.; Kuittinen, Markku; Svirko, Yuri; Kaplas, Tommi
Affiliation:
Univ Arizona, Coll Opt Sci
Issue Date:
2016-05-13
Publisher:
NATURE PUBLISHING GROUP
Citation:
Pyrolytic carbon coated black silicon 2016, 6:25922 Scientific Reports
Journal:
Scientific Reports
Rights:
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.
Collection Information:
This item from the UA Faculty Publications collection is made available by the University of Arizona with support from the University of Arizona Libraries. If you have questions, please contact us at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.
Abstract:
Carbon is the most well-known black material in the history of man. Throughout the centuries, carbon has been used as a black material for paintings, camouflage, and optics. Although, the techniques to make other black surfaces have evolved and become more sophisticated with time, carbon still remains one of the best black materials. Another well-known black surface is black silicon, reflecting less than 0.5% of incident light in visible spectral range but becomes a highly reflecting surface in wavelengths above 1000 nm. On the other hand, carbon absorbs at those and longer wavelengths. Thus, it is possible to combine black silicon with carbon to create an artificial material with very low reflectivity over a wide spectral range. Here we report our results on coating conformally black silicon substrate with amorphous pyrolytic carbon. We present a superior black surface with reflectance of light less than 0.5% in the spectral range of 350 nm to 2000 nm.
ISSN:
2045-2322
DOI:
10.1038/srep25922
Keywords:
CHEMICAL-VAPOR-DEPOSITION; ABSORBER; GRAPHENE; FILMS; SPECTROSCOPY; PYROCARBON; CHEMISTRY; GRAPHITE; KINETICS
Version:
Final published version
Sponsors:
The research leading to these results has received funding from the European Union Seventh Framework Programme under grant agreement no. 604391 Graphene Flagship, NP-Nano FiDiPro-project by the Finnish Funding agency for Technology and Innovation (TEKES), Academy of Finland project no. 287886. AS and HL acknowledge the support from Aalto Energy Efficiency project Moppi. Support from the US National Science Foundation is also acknowledged through the CIAN ERC.
Additional Links:
http://www.nature.com/articles/srep25922

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorShah, Alien
dc.contributor.authorStenberg, Petrien
dc.contributor.authorKarvonen, Lasseen
dc.contributor.authorAli, Rizwanen
dc.contributor.authorHonkanen, Seppoen
dc.contributor.authorLipsanen, Harrien
dc.contributor.authorPeyghambarian, N.en
dc.contributor.authorKuittinen, Markkuen
dc.contributor.authorSvirko, Yurien
dc.contributor.authorKaplas, Tommien
dc.date.accessioned2016-06-24T23:33:25Z-
dc.date.available2016-06-24T23:33:25Z-
dc.date.issued2016-05-13-
dc.identifier.citationPyrolytic carbon coated black silicon 2016, 6:25922 Scientific Reportsen
dc.identifier.issn2045-2322-
dc.identifier.doi10.1038/srep25922-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/614762-
dc.description.abstractCarbon is the most well-known black material in the history of man. Throughout the centuries, carbon has been used as a black material for paintings, camouflage, and optics. Although, the techniques to make other black surfaces have evolved and become more sophisticated with time, carbon still remains one of the best black materials. Another well-known black surface is black silicon, reflecting less than 0.5% of incident light in visible spectral range but becomes a highly reflecting surface in wavelengths above 1000 nm. On the other hand, carbon absorbs at those and longer wavelengths. Thus, it is possible to combine black silicon with carbon to create an artificial material with very low reflectivity over a wide spectral range. Here we report our results on coating conformally black silicon substrate with amorphous pyrolytic carbon. We present a superior black surface with reflectance of light less than 0.5% in the spectral range of 350 nm to 2000 nm.en
dc.description.sponsorshipThe research leading to these results has received funding from the European Union Seventh Framework Programme under grant agreement no. 604391 Graphene Flagship, NP-Nano FiDiPro-project by the Finnish Funding agency for Technology and Innovation (TEKES), Academy of Finland project no. 287886. AS and HL acknowledge the support from Aalto Energy Efficiency project Moppi. Support from the US National Science Foundation is also acknowledged through the CIAN ERC.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherNATURE PUBLISHING GROUPen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.nature.com/articles/srep25922en
dc.rightsThis work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.en
dc.subjectCHEMICAL-VAPOR-DEPOSITIONen
dc.subjectABSORBERen
dc.subjectGRAPHENEen
dc.subjectFILMSen
dc.subjectSPECTROSCOPYen
dc.subjectPYROCARBONen
dc.subjectCHEMISTRYen
dc.subjectGRAPHITEen
dc.subjectKINETICSen
dc.titlePyrolytic carbon coated black siliconen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniv Arizona, Coll Opt Scien
dc.identifier.journalScientific Reportsen
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item from the UA Faculty Publications collection is made available by the University of Arizona with support from the University of Arizona Libraries. If you have questions, please contact us at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.en
dc.eprint.versionFinal published versionen
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