Cosmological tests using the angular size of galaxy clusters

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/614750
Title:
Cosmological tests using the angular size of galaxy clusters
Author:
Wei, J.-J.; Wu, X.-F.; Melia, F.
Affiliation:
The University of Arizona
Issue Date:
2014-12-18
Publisher:
OXFORD UNIV PRESS
Citation:
Cosmological tests using the angular size of galaxy clusters 2014, 447 (1):479 Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society
Journal:
Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society
Rights:
© 2014 The Authors Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Royal Astronomical Societ
Collection Information:
This item from the UA Faculty Publications collection is made available by the University of Arizona with support from the University of Arizona Libraries. If you have questions, please contact us at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.
Abstract:
We use measurements of the galaxy-cluster angular size versus redshift to test and compare the standard model ($\Lambda$CDM) and the $R_{\rm h}=ct$ Universe. We show that the latter fits the data with a reduced $\chi^2_{\rm dof}=0.786$ for a Hubble constant $H_{0}= 72.6_{-3.4}^{+3.8}$ km $\rm s^{-1}$ $\rm Mpc^{-1}$, and $H_{0}$ is the sole parameter in this model. By comparison, the optimal flat $\Lambda$CDM model, with two free parameters (including $\Omega_{\rm m}=0.50$ and $H_{0}=73.9_{-9.5}^{+10.6}$ km $\rm s^{-1}$ $\rm Mpc^{-1}$), fits the angular-size data with a reduced $\chi^2_{\rm dof}=0.806$. On the basis of their $\chi^2_{\rm dof}$ values alone, both models appear to account for the data very well in spite of the fact that the $R_{\rm h}=ct$ Universe expands at a constant rate, while $\Lambda$CDM does not. However, because of the different number of free parameters in these models, selection tools, such as the Bayes Information Criterion, favour $R_{\rm h}=ct$ over $\Lambda$CDM with a likelihood of $\sim 86\%$ versus $\sim 14\%$. These results impact the question of galaxy growth at large redshifts. Previous work suggested an inconsistency with the underlying cosmological model unless elliptical and disk galaxies grew in size by a surprisingly large factor $\sim 6$ from $z\sim 3$ to $0$. The fact that both $\Lambda$CDM and $R_{\rm h}=ct$ fit the cluster-size measurements quite well casts some doubt on the suggestion that the unexpected result with individual galaxies may be due to the use of an incorrect expansion scenario, rather than astrophysical causes, such as mergers and/or selection effects.
ISSN:
0035-8711; 1365-2966
DOI:
10.1093/mnras/stu2470
Version:
Final published version
Additional Links:
http://mnras.oxfordjournals.org/cgi/doi/10.1093/mnras/stu2470

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorWei, J.-J.en
dc.contributor.authorWu, X.-F.en
dc.contributor.authorMelia, F.en
dc.date.accessioned2016-06-25T00:50:20Z-
dc.date.available2016-06-25T00:50:20Z-
dc.date.issued2014-12-18-
dc.identifier.citationCosmological tests using the angular size of galaxy clusters 2014, 447 (1):479 Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Societyen
dc.identifier.issn0035-8711-
dc.identifier.issn1365-2966-
dc.identifier.doi10.1093/mnras/stu2470-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/614750-
dc.description.abstractWe use measurements of the galaxy-cluster angular size versus redshift to test and compare the standard model ($\Lambda$CDM) and the $R_{\rm h}=ct$ Universe. We show that the latter fits the data with a reduced $\chi^2_{\rm dof}=0.786$ for a Hubble constant $H_{0}= 72.6_{-3.4}^{+3.8}$ km $\rm s^{-1}$ $\rm Mpc^{-1}$, and $H_{0}$ is the sole parameter in this model. By comparison, the optimal flat $\Lambda$CDM model, with two free parameters (including $\Omega_{\rm m}=0.50$ and $H_{0}=73.9_{-9.5}^{+10.6}$ km $\rm s^{-1}$ $\rm Mpc^{-1}$), fits the angular-size data with a reduced $\chi^2_{\rm dof}=0.806$. On the basis of their $\chi^2_{\rm dof}$ values alone, both models appear to account for the data very well in spite of the fact that the $R_{\rm h}=ct$ Universe expands at a constant rate, while $\Lambda$CDM does not. However, because of the different number of free parameters in these models, selection tools, such as the Bayes Information Criterion, favour $R_{\rm h}=ct$ over $\Lambda$CDM with a likelihood of $\sim 86\%$ versus $\sim 14\%$. These results impact the question of galaxy growth at large redshifts. Previous work suggested an inconsistency with the underlying cosmological model unless elliptical and disk galaxies grew in size by a surprisingly large factor $\sim 6$ from $z\sim 3$ to $0$. The fact that both $\Lambda$CDM and $R_{\rm h}=ct$ fit the cluster-size measurements quite well casts some doubt on the suggestion that the unexpected result with individual galaxies may be due to the use of an incorrect expansion scenario, rather than astrophysical causes, such as mergers and/or selection effects.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherOXFORD UNIV PRESSen
dc.relation.urlhttp://mnras.oxfordjournals.org/cgi/doi/10.1093/mnras/stu2470en
dc.rights© 2014 The Authors Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Royal Astronomical Societen
dc.titleCosmological tests using the angular size of galaxy clustersen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentThe University of Arizonaen
dc.identifier.journalMonthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Societyen
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item from the UA Faculty Publications collection is made available by the University of Arizona with support from the University of Arizona Libraries. If you have questions, please contact us at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.en
dc.eprint.versionFinal published versionen
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