Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/614735
Title:
Advanced Orbiting Systems: A Standard Architecture for Space Data Communications
Author:
Hooke, Adrian J.
Affiliation:
California Institute of Technology
Issue Date:
1989-11
Rights:
Copyright © International Foundation for Telemetering
Collection Information:
Proceedings from the International Telemetering Conference are made available by the International Foundation for Telemetering and the University of Arizona Libraries. Visit http://www.telemetry.org/index.php/contact-us if you have questions about items in this collection.
Publisher:
International Foundation for Telemetering
Journal:
International Telemetering Conference Proceedings
Abstract:
The first thirty years of civilian space exploration were characterized by a series of individual missions, focussed towards specific goals and servicing small and close-knit user communities. Spacecraft (constrained by power, weight and volume considerations) were customized towards mission objectives. Their data handling and communications systems were primarily built for simplicity and robustness, and displayed little commonality from mission to mission. All of the easy space missions have now been flown. As we move into the 1990s, requirements exist for complex missions involving Earth observation, exploration and a more permanent human presence in space. Internationalization of these missions is inevitable as a means to distribute and share costs, and to increase their political stability. Automation of their data handling systems is essential to support reliable, low cost operations. Responding to this environment, the Consultative Committee for Space Data Systems (CCSDS) was formed in 1982 to develop and promote a full suite of internationally standardized space data communications protocols. The first set of recommended standards, covering the data handling requirements of conventional free-flying scientific spacecraft, was finalized in 1986. Using the international space station "Freedom" program (a cooperative venture between the US, Europe, Canada and Japan) as a requirements model, the CCSDS has now extended its suite of recommended standards to cover "advanced orbiting systems" such as unmanned and man-tended Earth observation platforms, new space transportation systems, and manned laboratories. These systems, which operate as longterm orbiting facilities and therefore have changing user communities, produce prodigious rates and volumes of data including digitized video and audio. For the first time, the orbiting systems will use local area networks for internal data transfer. On the ground, they will interface with networks designed for worldwide Open Systems Interconnection (OSI). This paper reviews the standard data handling service architecture which has been developed by CCSDS. It describes the communications protocols that are recommended for the networked transfer of space mission data, and focuses on the unique requirements of transmitting many different data types through weak signal, noisy space channels at rates which routinely may reach many hundreds of megabits per second.
Sponsors:
International Foundation for Telemetering
ISSN:
0884-5123; 0074-9079
Additional Links:
http://www.telemetry.org/

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.titleAdvanced Orbiting Systems: A Standard Architecture for Space Data Communicationsen_US
dc.contributor.authorHooke, Adrian J.en
dc.contributor.departmentCalifornia Institute of Technologyen
dc.date.issued1989-11-
dc.rightsCopyright © International Foundation for Telemeteringen
dc.description.collectioninformationProceedings from the International Telemetering Conference are made available by the International Foundation for Telemetering and the University of Arizona Libraries. Visit http://www.telemetry.org/index.php/contact-us if you have questions about items in this collection.en
dc.publisherInternational Foundation for Telemeteringen
dc.description.abstractThe first thirty years of civilian space exploration were characterized by a series of individual missions, focussed towards specific goals and servicing small and close-knit user communities. Spacecraft (constrained by power, weight and volume considerations) were customized towards mission objectives. Their data handling and communications systems were primarily built for simplicity and robustness, and displayed little commonality from mission to mission. All of the easy space missions have now been flown. As we move into the 1990s, requirements exist for complex missions involving Earth observation, exploration and a more permanent human presence in space. Internationalization of these missions is inevitable as a means to distribute and share costs, and to increase their political stability. Automation of their data handling systems is essential to support reliable, low cost operations. Responding to this environment, the Consultative Committee for Space Data Systems (CCSDS) was formed in 1982 to develop and promote a full suite of internationally standardized space data communications protocols. The first set of recommended standards, covering the data handling requirements of conventional free-flying scientific spacecraft, was finalized in 1986. Using the international space station "Freedom" program (a cooperative venture between the US, Europe, Canada and Japan) as a requirements model, the CCSDS has now extended its suite of recommended standards to cover "advanced orbiting systems" such as unmanned and man-tended Earth observation platforms, new space transportation systems, and manned laboratories. These systems, which operate as longterm orbiting facilities and therefore have changing user communities, produce prodigious rates and volumes of data including digitized video and audio. For the first time, the orbiting systems will use local area networks for internal data transfer. On the ground, they will interface with networks designed for worldwide Open Systems Interconnection (OSI). This paper reviews the standard data handling service architecture which has been developed by CCSDS. It describes the communications protocols that are recommended for the networked transfer of space mission data, and focuses on the unique requirements of transmitting many different data types through weak signal, noisy space channels at rates which routinely may reach many hundreds of megabits per second.en
dc.description.sponsorshipInternational Foundation for Telemeteringen
dc.identifier.issn0884-5123-
dc.identifier.issn0074-9079-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/614735-
dc.identifier.journalInternational Telemetering Conference Proceedingsen
dc.typetexten
dc.typeProceedingsen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.telemetry.org/en
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