Human Epithelial Cells Discriminate between Commensal and Pathogenic Interactions with Candida albicans

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/614654
Title:
Human Epithelial Cells Discriminate between Commensal and Pathogenic Interactions with Candida albicans
Author:
Rast, Timothy J.; Kullas, Amy L.; Southern, Peter J.; Davis, Dana A.
Affiliation:
Univ Arizona, Dept Ecol & Evolutionary Biol
Issue Date:
2016-04-18
Publisher:
Public Library of Science
Citation:
Human Epithelial Cells Discriminate between Commensal and Pathogenic Interactions with Candida albicans 2016, 11 (4):e0153165 PLOS ONE
Journal:
PLOS ONE
Rights:
© 2016 Rast et al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License , which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited
Collection Information:
This item from the UA Faculty Publications collection is made available by the University of Arizona with support from the University of Arizona Libraries. If you have questions, please contact us at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.
Abstract:
The commensal fungus, Candida albicans, can cause life-threatening infections in at risk individuals. C. albicans colonizes mucosal surfaces of most people, adhering to and interacting with epithelial cells. At low concentrations, C. albicans is not pathogenic nor does it cause epithelial cell damage in vitro; at high concentrations, C. albicans causes mucosal infections and kills epithelial cells in vitro. Here we show that while there are quantitative dose-dependent differences in exposed epithelial cell populations, these reflect a fundamental qualitative difference in host cell response to C. albicans. Using transcriptional profiling experiments and real time PCR, we found that wild-type C. albicans induce dose-dependent responses from a FaDu epithelial cell line. However, real time PCR and Western blot analysis using a high dose of various C. albicans strains demonstrated that these dose-dependent responses are associated with ability to promote host cell damage. Our studies support the idea that epithelial cells play a key role in the immune system by monitoring the microbial community at mucosal surfaces and initiating defensive responses when this community is dysfunctional. This places epithelial cells at a pivotal position in the interaction with C. albicans as epithelial cells themselves promote C. albicans stimulated damage.
ISSN:
1932-6203
DOI:
10.1371/journal.pone.0153165
Keywords:
TOLL-LIKE RECEPTORS; ENDOTHELIAL-CELLS; PATHWAY; INFECTIONS; ADHERENCE; PROMOTER; BINDING; GENES; SHOCK; LINE
Version:
Final published version
Sponsors:
Funded by University of Minnesota (http://www.research.umn.edu): #18805, National Institutes of Health (http://www.niaid.nih.gov/Pages/default.aspx): 1R01 AI064054-01, and Burroughs Wellcome Fund (http://www.bwfund.org): #1004419. The funders had no role in study design, data collection and analysis, decision to publish, or preparation of the manuscript.
Additional Links:
http://dx.plos.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0153165

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorRast, Timothy J.en
dc.contributor.authorKullas, Amy L.en
dc.contributor.authorSouthern, Peter J.en
dc.contributor.authorDavis, Dana A.en
dc.date.accessioned2016-06-24T20:53:35Z-
dc.date.available2016-06-24T20:53:35Z-
dc.date.issued2016-04-18-
dc.identifier.citationHuman Epithelial Cells Discriminate between Commensal and Pathogenic Interactions with Candida albicans 2016, 11 (4):e0153165 PLOS ONEen
dc.identifier.issn1932-6203-
dc.identifier.doi10.1371/journal.pone.0153165-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/614654-
dc.description.abstractThe commensal fungus, Candida albicans, can cause life-threatening infections in at risk individuals. C. albicans colonizes mucosal surfaces of most people, adhering to and interacting with epithelial cells. At low concentrations, C. albicans is not pathogenic nor does it cause epithelial cell damage in vitro; at high concentrations, C. albicans causes mucosal infections and kills epithelial cells in vitro. Here we show that while there are quantitative dose-dependent differences in exposed epithelial cell populations, these reflect a fundamental qualitative difference in host cell response to C. albicans. Using transcriptional profiling experiments and real time PCR, we found that wild-type C. albicans induce dose-dependent responses from a FaDu epithelial cell line. However, real time PCR and Western blot analysis using a high dose of various C. albicans strains demonstrated that these dose-dependent responses are associated with ability to promote host cell damage. Our studies support the idea that epithelial cells play a key role in the immune system by monitoring the microbial community at mucosal surfaces and initiating defensive responses when this community is dysfunctional. This places epithelial cells at a pivotal position in the interaction with C. albicans as epithelial cells themselves promote C. albicans stimulated damage.en
dc.description.sponsorshipFunded by University of Minnesota (http://www.research.umn.edu): #18805, National Institutes of Health (http://www.niaid.nih.gov/Pages/default.aspx): 1R01 AI064054-01, and Burroughs Wellcome Fund (http://www.bwfund.org): #1004419. The funders had no role in study design, data collection and analysis, decision to publish, or preparation of the manuscript.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherPublic Library of Scienceen
dc.relation.urlhttp://dx.plos.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0153165en
dc.rights© 2016 Rast et al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License , which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are crediteden
dc.subjectTOLL-LIKE RECEPTORSen
dc.subjectENDOTHELIAL-CELLSen
dc.subjectPATHWAYen
dc.subjectINFECTIONSen
dc.subjectADHERENCEen
dc.subjectPROMOTERen
dc.subjectBINDINGen
dc.subjectGENESen
dc.subjectSHOCKen
dc.subjectLINEen
dc.titleHuman Epithelial Cells Discriminate between Commensal and Pathogenic Interactions with Candida albicansen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniv Arizona, Dept Ecol & Evolutionary Biolen
dc.identifier.journalPLOS ONEen
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item from the UA Faculty Publications collection is made available by the University of Arizona with support from the University of Arizona Libraries. If you have questions, please contact us at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.en
dc.eprint.versionFinal published versionen
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