Contraceptive Use and Uptake of HIV-Testing among Sub-Saharan African Women

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/614630
Title:
Contraceptive Use and Uptake of HIV-Testing among Sub-Saharan African Women
Author:
Center, Katherine E. ( 0000-0002-5635-310X ) ; Gunn, Jayleen K. L.; Asaolu, Ibitola O.; Gibson, Steven J.; Ehiri, John E.
Affiliation:
Univ Arizona, Dept Obstet & Gynecol; Univ Arizona, Dept Epidemiol & Biostat, Mel & Enid Zuckerman Coll Publ Hlth; Univ Arizona, Dept Hlth Promot Sci, Mel & Enid Zuckerman Coll Publ Hlth; Univ Arizona, Ctr Canc
Issue Date:
2016-04-25
Publisher:
Public Library of Science
Citation:
Contraceptive Use and Uptake of HIV-Testing among Sub-Saharan African Women 2016, 11 (4):e0154213 PLOS ONE
Journal:
PLOS ONE
Rights:
© 2016 Center et al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License , which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited
Collection Information:
This item from the UA Faculty Publications collection is made available by the University of Arizona with support from the University of Arizona Libraries. If you have questions, please contact us at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.
Abstract:
Despite improved availability of simple, relatively inexpensive, and highly effective antiretroviral treatment for HIV/AIDS, the disease remains a major public health challenge for women in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA). Given the numerous barriers in access to care for women in this region, every health issue that brings them into contact with the health system should be optimized as an opportunity to integrate HIV/AIDS prevention. Because most non-condom forms of modern contraception require a clinical appointment for use, contraception appointments could provide a confidential opportunity for access to HIV counseling, testing, and referral to care. This study sought to investigate the relationship between contraceptive methods and HIV testing among women in SSA. Data from the Demographic and Health Survey from four African countries-Congo, Mozambique, Nigeria, and Uganda-was used to examine whether modern (e.g., pills, condom) or traditional (e.g., periodic abstinence, withdrawal) forms of contraception were associated with uptake of HIV testing. Data for the current analyses were restricted to 35,748 women with complete information on the variables of interest. Chi-square tests and logistic regression models were used to assess the relationship between uptake of HIV testing and respondents' baseline characteristics and contraceptive methods. In the total sample and in Mozambique, women who used modern forms of contraception were more likely to be tested for HIV compared to those who did not use contraception. This positive association was not demonstrated in Congo, Nigeria, or Uganda. That many women who access modern contraception are not tested for HIV in high HIV burden areas highlights a missed opportunity to deliver an important intervention to promote maternal and child health. Given the increasing popularity of hormonal contraception methods in low-income countries, there is an urgent need to integrate HIV counseling, testing, and treatment into family planning programs. Women on hormonal contraceptives should be encouraged to continue to use condoms for HIV-prevention.
ISSN:
1932-6203
DOI:
10.1371/journal.pone.0154213
Keywords:
METAANALYSIS; PREVENTION; INFECTION; ABC
Version:
Final published version
Additional Links:
http://dx.plos.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0154213

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorCenter, Katherine E.en
dc.contributor.authorGunn, Jayleen K. L.en
dc.contributor.authorAsaolu, Ibitola O.en
dc.contributor.authorGibson, Steven J.en
dc.contributor.authorEhiri, John E.en
dc.date.accessioned2016-06-24T20:50:40Z-
dc.date.available2016-06-24T20:50:40Z-
dc.date.issued2016-04-25-
dc.identifier.citationContraceptive Use and Uptake of HIV-Testing among Sub-Saharan African Women 2016, 11 (4):e0154213 PLOS ONEen
dc.identifier.issn1932-6203-
dc.identifier.doi10.1371/journal.pone.0154213-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/614630-
dc.description.abstractDespite improved availability of simple, relatively inexpensive, and highly effective antiretroviral treatment for HIV/AIDS, the disease remains a major public health challenge for women in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA). Given the numerous barriers in access to care for women in this region, every health issue that brings them into contact with the health system should be optimized as an opportunity to integrate HIV/AIDS prevention. Because most non-condom forms of modern contraception require a clinical appointment for use, contraception appointments could provide a confidential opportunity for access to HIV counseling, testing, and referral to care. This study sought to investigate the relationship between contraceptive methods and HIV testing among women in SSA. Data from the Demographic and Health Survey from four African countries-Congo, Mozambique, Nigeria, and Uganda-was used to examine whether modern (e.g., pills, condom) or traditional (e.g., periodic abstinence, withdrawal) forms of contraception were associated with uptake of HIV testing. Data for the current analyses were restricted to 35,748 women with complete information on the variables of interest. Chi-square tests and logistic regression models were used to assess the relationship between uptake of HIV testing and respondents' baseline characteristics and contraceptive methods. In the total sample and in Mozambique, women who used modern forms of contraception were more likely to be tested for HIV compared to those who did not use contraception. This positive association was not demonstrated in Congo, Nigeria, or Uganda. That many women who access modern contraception are not tested for HIV in high HIV burden areas highlights a missed opportunity to deliver an important intervention to promote maternal and child health. Given the increasing popularity of hormonal contraception methods in low-income countries, there is an urgent need to integrate HIV counseling, testing, and treatment into family planning programs. Women on hormonal contraceptives should be encouraged to continue to use condoms for HIV-prevention.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherPublic Library of Scienceen
dc.relation.urlhttp://dx.plos.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0154213en
dc.rights© 2016 Center et al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License , which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are crediteden
dc.subjectMETAANALYSISen
dc.subjectPREVENTIONen
dc.subjectINFECTIONen
dc.subjectABCen
dc.titleContraceptive Use and Uptake of HIV-Testing among Sub-Saharan African Womenen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniv Arizona, Dept Obstet & Gynecolen
dc.contributor.departmentUniv Arizona, Dept Epidemiol & Biostat, Mel & Enid Zuckerman Coll Publ Hlthen
dc.contributor.departmentUniv Arizona, Dept Hlth Promot Sci, Mel & Enid Zuckerman Coll Publ Hlthen
dc.contributor.departmentUniv Arizona, Ctr Cancen
dc.identifier.journalPLOS ONEen
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item from the UA Faculty Publications collection is made available by the University of Arizona with support from the University of Arizona Libraries. If you have questions, please contact us at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.en
dc.eprint.versionFinal published versionen
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