Perceived Level and Sources of Stress in Pharmacy Administrators, Faculty and Staff

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/614600
Title:
Perceived Level and Sources of Stress in Pharmacy Administrators, Faculty and Staff
Author:
Chen, Stephanie; Hall, Lindsey; Murphy, John E.
Affiliation:
College of Pharmacy, The University of Arizona
Issue Date:
2011
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author.
Collection Information:
This item is part of the Pharmacy Student Research Projects collection, made available by the College of Pharmacy and the University Libraries at the University of Arizona. For more information about items in this collection, please contact Jennifer Martin, Associate Librarian and Clinical Instructor, Pharmacy Practice and Science, jenmartin@email.arizona.edu.
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Abstract:
OBJECTIVES: To analyze the levels and sources of stress and to identify demographics related to stress prevalent in administrators, faculty and staff at the University of Arizona, College of Pharmacy. METHODS: A stress questionnaire was designed and administered to 171 administrators, faculty and staff at the University of Arizona, College of Pharmacy. The dependent variables were sources of stress and total stress levels. The independent demographic variables were sex, marital status, tenure status and percentage of time involved with student interaction. RESULTS: Questionnaires were completed by 11 administrators, 28 faculty and 27 staff. Faculty reported significantly more stress from participation in committees and negative interactions with college personnel compared to staff (p=0.03, p=0.02 respectively). Staff reported significantly more stress from uncertainty about job security compared to faculty (p=0.02). Females reported significantly higher levels of stress in influencing departmental decisions, resolving differences with supervisors and uncertainty about job security (p=0.03, p=0.002, p=0.04 respectively) compared to males. Inadequate salary was reported as significantly more stressful for faculty who are tenure-eligible but not tenured yet compared to staff (p=0.046). CONCLUSION: Overall, administrators, faculty and staff experienced slight to moderate stress levels. Administrators, faculty and staff shared some similarities and differences in levels and sources of stress with few significant differences. In addition, there was little difference among the groups based on the demographic identifiers explored.
Description:
Class of 2011 Abstract
Keywords:
Stress; Administrators; Pharmacy
Advisor:
Murphy, John E.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.advisorMurphy, John E.en
dc.contributor.authorChen, Stephanieen
dc.contributor.authorHall, Lindseyen
dc.contributor.authorMurphy, John E.en
dc.date.accessioned2016-06-24T15:20:20Z-
dc.date.available2016-06-24T15:20:20Z-
dc.date.issued2011-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/614600-
dc.descriptionClass of 2011 Abstracten
dc.description.abstractOBJECTIVES: To analyze the levels and sources of stress and to identify demographics related to stress prevalent in administrators, faculty and staff at the University of Arizona, College of Pharmacy. METHODS: A stress questionnaire was designed and administered to 171 administrators, faculty and staff at the University of Arizona, College of Pharmacy. The dependent variables were sources of stress and total stress levels. The independent demographic variables were sex, marital status, tenure status and percentage of time involved with student interaction. RESULTS: Questionnaires were completed by 11 administrators, 28 faculty and 27 staff. Faculty reported significantly more stress from participation in committees and negative interactions with college personnel compared to staff (p=0.03, p=0.02 respectively). Staff reported significantly more stress from uncertainty about job security compared to faculty (p=0.02). Females reported significantly higher levels of stress in influencing departmental decisions, resolving differences with supervisors and uncertainty about job security (p=0.03, p=0.002, p=0.04 respectively) compared to males. Inadequate salary was reported as significantly more stressful for faculty who are tenure-eligible but not tenured yet compared to staff (p=0.046). CONCLUSION: Overall, administrators, faculty and staff experienced slight to moderate stress levels. Administrators, faculty and staff shared some similarities and differences in levels and sources of stress with few significant differences. In addition, there was little difference among the groups based on the demographic identifiers explored.en
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author.en
dc.subjectStressen
dc.subjectAdministratorsen
dc.subjectPharmacyen
dc.titlePerceived Level and Sources of Stress in Pharmacy Administrators, Faculty and Staffen_US
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Reporten
dc.contributor.departmentCollege of Pharmacy, The University of Arizonaen
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item is part of the Pharmacy Student Research Projects collection, made available by the College of Pharmacy and the University Libraries at the University of Arizona. For more information about items in this collection, please contact Jennifer Martin, Associate Librarian and Clinical Instructor, Pharmacy Practice and Science, jenmartin@email.arizona.edu.en
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