Unclaimed Prescriptions in a Retail Pharmacy Setting: Which Prescriptions Are Not Being Picked Up?

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/614593
Title:
Unclaimed Prescriptions in a Retail Pharmacy Setting: Which Prescriptions Are Not Being Picked Up?
Author:
Penneman, Caren; Voepel, Kyle; Boesen, Kevin
Affiliation:
College of Pharmacy, The University of Arizona
Issue Date:
2011
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author.
Collection Information:
This item is part of the Pharmacy Student Research Projects collection, made available by the College of Pharmacy and the University Libraries at the University of Arizona. For more information about items in this collection, please contact Jennifer Martin, Associate Librarian and Clinical Instructor, Pharmacy Practice and Science, jenmartin@email.arizona.edu.
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Abstract:
OBJECTIVES: To quantify and explore the trends of medications which are left unclaimed in community pharmacies. METHODS: Walgreens’ pharmacies have a process that prints off a list of all prescriptions that are left unclaimed for a period of 10 days. The paperwork accounting for the medications unclaimed between the dates of September 1, 2010 through September 30, 2010 were analyzed from two Tucson Walgreens’ pharmacies. Medications were grouped into one of fifteen categories (i.e. anti-lipids, anti-hypertensives, etc) and once data collection was completed total number of prescriptions for each category was determined. Data was then compared between the two pharmacies. RESULTS: A total of 907 prescriptions were accounted for during the 30-day period with anti-psychotics and anti-hypertensive medications being the most common prescriptions left unclaimed in both pharmacies. CONCLUSION: Pharmacists need to make a large effort to stress patient compliance on all medications, with even greater emphasis on those medications that tend to be left unclaimed more often than others.
Description:
Class of 2011 Abstract
Keywords:
Prescriptions; Pharmacy Setting; Unclaimed
Advisor:
Boesen, Kevin

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.advisorBoesen, Kevinen
dc.contributor.authorPenneman, Carenen
dc.contributor.authorVoepel, Kyleen
dc.contributor.authorBoesen, Kevinen
dc.date.accessioned2016-06-24T15:56:28Z-
dc.date.available2016-06-24T15:56:28Z-
dc.date.issued2011-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/614593-
dc.descriptionClass of 2011 Abstracten
dc.description.abstractOBJECTIVES: To quantify and explore the trends of medications which are left unclaimed in community pharmacies. METHODS: Walgreens’ pharmacies have a process that prints off a list of all prescriptions that are left unclaimed for a period of 10 days. The paperwork accounting for the medications unclaimed between the dates of September 1, 2010 through September 30, 2010 were analyzed from two Tucson Walgreens’ pharmacies. Medications were grouped into one of fifteen categories (i.e. anti-lipids, anti-hypertensives, etc) and once data collection was completed total number of prescriptions for each category was determined. Data was then compared between the two pharmacies. RESULTS: A total of 907 prescriptions were accounted for during the 30-day period with anti-psychotics and anti-hypertensive medications being the most common prescriptions left unclaimed in both pharmacies. CONCLUSION: Pharmacists need to make a large effort to stress patient compliance on all medications, with even greater emphasis on those medications that tend to be left unclaimed more often than others.en
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author.en
dc.subjectPrescriptionsen
dc.subjectPharmacy Settingen
dc.subjectUnclaimeden
dc.titleUnclaimed Prescriptions in a Retail Pharmacy Setting: Which Prescriptions Are Not Being Picked Up?en_US
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Reporten
dc.contributor.departmentCollege of Pharmacy, The University of Arizonaen
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item is part of the Pharmacy Student Research Projects collection, made available by the College of Pharmacy and the University Libraries at the University of Arizona. For more information about items in this collection, please contact Jennifer Martin, Associate Librarian and Clinical Instructor, Pharmacy Practice and Science, jenmartin@email.arizona.edu.en
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