Student Pharmacists’ Knowledge and Attitudes Towards Herbal Medications: A Pilot Test at One University

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/614518
Title:
Student Pharmacists’ Knowledge and Attitudes Towards Herbal Medications: A Pilot Test at One University
Author:
Ling, Jessica; Tang, Diana; Lee, Jeannie
Affiliation:
College of Pharmacy, The University of Arizona
Issue Date:
2012
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author.
Collection Information:
This item is part of the Pharmacy Student Research Projects collection, made available by the College of Pharmacy and the University Libraries at the University of Arizona. For more information about items in this collection, please contact Jennifer Martin, Associate Librarian and Clinical Instructor, Pharmacy Practice and Science, jenmartin@email.arizona.edu.
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Abstract:
Specific Aims: To determine pharmacy students' knowledge and attitudes towards herbal medicine, and to identify factors that have the most influence on herbal knowledge. Subjects: Students in the 1st, 2nd, 3rd, or 4th years of the Doctor of Pharmacy program at the University of Arizona. Methods: Questionnaires administered during regularly scheduled classes and email collected knowledge, attitudes, and demographic data. This included age, gender, highest level of education, completion of herbal medication/OTC course, practice site, availability of herbals and herbal information at the practice site, and use of herbal medication in a family member. Main Results: Questionnaires were completed by 270 out of the 395 students enrolled in pharmacy school. An average of 4.8 ± 3.02 out of the 14 questions (34%) were answered correctly on the knowledge section. Pharmacy students agreed that providing information about herbal medication is a pharmacist's professional responsibility and that an elective course on herbal medications would be useful (mean = 3.31 ± 1.52 and 3.73 ± 1.32 respectively on a scale of 0-5 where 5 = strongly agree and 0 = do not agree). Pharmacy school year and completion of an herbal/OTC course were the largest contributing factors to higher scores on the knowledge portion. Conclusions: With an average knowledge score of less than 50% and average rating of less than 2.5 out of 5, pharmacy students have a weak understanding and a low confidence level in recommending and counseling patients on herbal medications. Requiring a course that includes herbal medications may be beneficial.
Description:
Class of 2012 abstract
Keywords:
Medications; Herbal; University of Arizona; Pharmacists’
Advisor:
Lee, Jeannie

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.advisorLee, Jeannieen
dc.contributor.authorLing, Jessicaen
dc.contributor.authorTang, Dianaen
dc.contributor.authorLee, Jeannieen
dc.date.accessioned2016-06-23T19:59:17Z-
dc.date.available2016-06-23T19:59:17Z-
dc.date.issued2012-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/614518-
dc.descriptionClass of 2012 abstracten
dc.description.abstractSpecific Aims: To determine pharmacy students' knowledge and attitudes towards herbal medicine, and to identify factors that have the most influence on herbal knowledge. Subjects: Students in the 1st, 2nd, 3rd, or 4th years of the Doctor of Pharmacy program at the University of Arizona. Methods: Questionnaires administered during regularly scheduled classes and email collected knowledge, attitudes, and demographic data. This included age, gender, highest level of education, completion of herbal medication/OTC course, practice site, availability of herbals and herbal information at the practice site, and use of herbal medication in a family member. Main Results: Questionnaires were completed by 270 out of the 395 students enrolled in pharmacy school. An average of 4.8 ± 3.02 out of the 14 questions (34%) were answered correctly on the knowledge section. Pharmacy students agreed that providing information about herbal medication is a pharmacist's professional responsibility and that an elective course on herbal medications would be useful (mean = 3.31 ± 1.52 and 3.73 ± 1.32 respectively on a scale of 0-5 where 5 = strongly agree and 0 = do not agree). Pharmacy school year and completion of an herbal/OTC course were the largest contributing factors to higher scores on the knowledge portion. Conclusions: With an average knowledge score of less than 50% and average rating of less than 2.5 out of 5, pharmacy students have a weak understanding and a low confidence level in recommending and counseling patients on herbal medications. Requiring a course that includes herbal medications may be beneficial.en
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author.en
dc.subjectMedicationsen
dc.subjectHerbalen
dc.subjectUniversity of Arizonaen
dc.subjectPharmacists’en
dc.titleStudent Pharmacists’ Knowledge and Attitudes Towards Herbal Medications: A Pilot Test at One Universityen_US
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Reporten
dc.contributor.departmentCollege of Pharmacy, The University of Arizonaen
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item is part of the Pharmacy Student Research Projects collection, made available by the College of Pharmacy and the University Libraries at the University of Arizona. For more information about items in this collection, please contact Jennifer Martin, Associate Librarian and Clinical Instructor, Pharmacy Practice and Science, jenmartin@email.arizona.edu.en
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