Effect of Providing Pharmacists with Patient Diagnosis on Electronic Prescription Orders: A Pilot Study

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/614515
Title:
Effect of Providing Pharmacists with Patient Diagnosis on Electronic Prescription Orders: A Pilot Study
Author:
Kurniawan, Guntur; Warholak, Terri
Affiliation:
College of Pharmacy, The University of Arizona
Issue Date:
2012
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author.
Collection Information:
This item is part of the Pharmacy Student Research Projects collection, made available by the College of Pharmacy and the University Libraries at the University of Arizona. For more information about items in this collection, please contact Jennifer Martin, Associate Librarian and Clinical Instructor, Pharmacy Practice and Science, jenmartin@email.arizona.edu.
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Abstract:
Specific Aims: To evaluate the effect on the incidence and nature of pharmacists’ drug utilization review (DUR) interventions of including patient diagnosis on electronic prescription (e-prescription) orders. Methods: This prospective pre-post evaluation was conducted in the outpatient pharmacy of a federally funded community health center over two consecutive four-week periods. During the pre-phase, a clinical pharmacist in the clinic’s onsite pharmacy prospectively reviewed the e-prescriptions received from the clinic’s primary care providers using a standard prospective DUR process and recorded all therapy-related interventions. In the post-phase, providers added a diagnosis on each e-prescription. Interventions were documented using a standard intervention form that has been used in previous research. Chi square and t-tests were used to assess the nominal and interval data, respectively (α=0.05). The Institutional Review Boards of the two collaborating universities approved the study. Main Results: Pharmacist intervention rates on problematic e-prescription orders significantly decreased (4% pre vs. 1% post, p<0.001). Drug-drug interactions (17.5% pre vs. 20% post) and missing information (15% pre vs. 20% post) were the most frequently cited problems that prompted the need for the pharmacist’s intervention. The medication classes most frequently involved in interventions were antibiotics (53% pre vs. 50% post) and central nervous system agents (17% pre vs. 10% post). After receiving clarification, the pharmacist most often dispensed the prescription (33.3% pre vs. 38.4% post) and educated the patient regarding their treatments (18.8% pre vs. 7.7% post). Conclusions: In this small pilot project, including the patient’s diagnosis on e-prescription orders significantly reduced the incidence of pharmacists’ DUR-related interventions. If duplicated in larger studies, our results suggest that providing pharmacists with additional targeted clinical information could reduce confusion and uncertainty thereby decreasing the number of unnecessary pharmacist contacts with prescribers and improving workflow and efficiency for both.
Description:
Class of 2012 Abstract
Keywords:
Pharmacists; Diagnosis; electronic prescription (e-prescription); drug utilization review (DUR)
Advisor:
Warholak, Terri

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.advisorWarholak, Terrien
dc.contributor.authorKurniawan, Gunturen
dc.contributor.authorWarholak, Terrien
dc.date.accessioned2016-06-23T19:50:29Z-
dc.date.available2016-06-23T19:50:29Z-
dc.date.issued2012-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/614515-
dc.descriptionClass of 2012 Abstracten
dc.description.abstractSpecific Aims: To evaluate the effect on the incidence and nature of pharmacists’ drug utilization review (DUR) interventions of including patient diagnosis on electronic prescription (e-prescription) orders. Methods: This prospective pre-post evaluation was conducted in the outpatient pharmacy of a federally funded community health center over two consecutive four-week periods. During the pre-phase, a clinical pharmacist in the clinic’s onsite pharmacy prospectively reviewed the e-prescriptions received from the clinic’s primary care providers using a standard prospective DUR process and recorded all therapy-related interventions. In the post-phase, providers added a diagnosis on each e-prescription. Interventions were documented using a standard intervention form that has been used in previous research. Chi square and t-tests were used to assess the nominal and interval data, respectively (α=0.05). The Institutional Review Boards of the two collaborating universities approved the study. Main Results: Pharmacist intervention rates on problematic e-prescription orders significantly decreased (4% pre vs. 1% post, p<0.001). Drug-drug interactions (17.5% pre vs. 20% post) and missing information (15% pre vs. 20% post) were the most frequently cited problems that prompted the need for the pharmacist’s intervention. The medication classes most frequently involved in interventions were antibiotics (53% pre vs. 50% post) and central nervous system agents (17% pre vs. 10% post). After receiving clarification, the pharmacist most often dispensed the prescription (33.3% pre vs. 38.4% post) and educated the patient regarding their treatments (18.8% pre vs. 7.7% post). Conclusions: In this small pilot project, including the patient’s diagnosis on e-prescription orders significantly reduced the incidence of pharmacists’ DUR-related interventions. If duplicated in larger studies, our results suggest that providing pharmacists with additional targeted clinical information could reduce confusion and uncertainty thereby decreasing the number of unnecessary pharmacist contacts with prescribers and improving workflow and efficiency for both.en
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author.en
dc.subjectPharmacistsen
dc.subjectDiagnosisen
dc.subjectelectronic prescription (e-prescription)en
dc.subjectdrug utilization review (DUR)en
dc.titleEffect of Providing Pharmacists with Patient Diagnosis on Electronic Prescription Orders: A Pilot Studyen_US
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Reporten
dc.contributor.departmentCollege of Pharmacy, The University of Arizonaen
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item is part of the Pharmacy Student Research Projects collection, made available by the College of Pharmacy and the University Libraries at the University of Arizona. For more information about items in this collection, please contact Jennifer Martin, Associate Librarian and Clinical Instructor, Pharmacy Practice and Science, jenmartin@email.arizona.edu.en
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