Venom Variability and Health Severity Outcomes of the Mohave rattlesnake (Crotalus scutulatus scutulatus) from Southern Arizona

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/614479
Title:
Venom Variability and Health Severity Outcomes of the Mohave rattlesnake (Crotalus scutulatus scutulatus) from Southern Arizona
Author:
Curtis, Ryan; Richards, Kelvin; Boesen, Keith
Affiliation:
College of Pharmacy, The University of Arizona
Issue Date:
2012
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author.
Collection Information:
This item is part of the Pharmacy Student Research Projects collection, made available by the College of Pharmacy and the University Libraries at the University of Arizona. For more information about items in this collection, please contact Jennifer Martin, Associate Librarian and Clinical Instructor, Pharmacy Practice and Science, jenmartin@email.arizona.edu.
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Abstract:
Specific Aims: Determine the difference in venom potency among Mohave Rattlesnakes in Cochise in Pima Counties and determine if those differences correlate to changes in clinical outcomes. Methods: Twenty-one Mohave rattlesnakes, C. s. scutulatus were collected from Arizona and New Mexico. Venom proteomes were analyzed using RP-HPLC and SDS-PAGE. The toxicity of venoms was analyzed using LD50. Health severity outcomes between two Arizona counties, Pima and Cochise, were determined by retrospective chart review of the Arizona Poison and Drug Information Center database between 2002-2009. Main Results: Six phenotypes were identified based on three venom proteins; Mojave toxin, SVMP PI and PIII, and myotoxin. Venom changed geographically from SVMP-rich to Mojave toxin-rich phenotypes from south central to southeastern Arizona. Phenotypes containing myotoxins were only found in the transitional zone between the SVMP and Mojave toxin phenotypes. Venom samples containing the largest amounts of SVMP or Mojave toxin had highest and lowest LD50s, respectively. Conclusions: There was a significant difference when comparing the presence of CNS affects between Pima and Cochise counties (p = 0.001). No significant difference was found when comparing severity number of antivenom vials administered, days spent in a health care facility or envenomation per 100,000 population. Although not part of the original data to be collected, death and intubations, were also noted. There is a 10x and 50x increased risk of death or intubations if envenomated in Cochise County.
Description:
Class of 2012 Abstract
Keywords:
Venom; Mohave rattlesnake (Crotalus scutulatus scutulatus); Outcomes; Southern Arizona
Advisor:
Boesen, Keith

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.advisorBoesen, Keithen
dc.contributor.authorCurtis, Ryanen
dc.contributor.authorRichards, Kelvinen
dc.contributor.authorBoesen, Keithen
dc.date.accessioned2016-06-23T18:45:04Z-
dc.date.available2016-06-23T18:45:04Z-
dc.date.issued2012-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/614479-
dc.descriptionClass of 2012 Abstracten
dc.description.abstractSpecific Aims: Determine the difference in venom potency among Mohave Rattlesnakes in Cochise in Pima Counties and determine if those differences correlate to changes in clinical outcomes. Methods: Twenty-one Mohave rattlesnakes, C. s. scutulatus were collected from Arizona and New Mexico. Venom proteomes were analyzed using RP-HPLC and SDS-PAGE. The toxicity of venoms was analyzed using LD50. Health severity outcomes between two Arizona counties, Pima and Cochise, were determined by retrospective chart review of the Arizona Poison and Drug Information Center database between 2002-2009. Main Results: Six phenotypes were identified based on three venom proteins; Mojave toxin, SVMP PI and PIII, and myotoxin. Venom changed geographically from SVMP-rich to Mojave toxin-rich phenotypes from south central to southeastern Arizona. Phenotypes containing myotoxins were only found in the transitional zone between the SVMP and Mojave toxin phenotypes. Venom samples containing the largest amounts of SVMP or Mojave toxin had highest and lowest LD50s, respectively. Conclusions: There was a significant difference when comparing the presence of CNS affects between Pima and Cochise counties (p = 0.001). No significant difference was found when comparing severity number of antivenom vials administered, days spent in a health care facility or envenomation per 100,000 population. Although not part of the original data to be collected, death and intubations, were also noted. There is a 10x and 50x increased risk of death or intubations if envenomated in Cochise County.en
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author.en
dc.subjectVenomen
dc.subjectMohave rattlesnake (Crotalus scutulatus scutulatus)en
dc.subjectOutcomesen
dc.subjectSouthern Arizonaen
dc.titleVenom Variability and Health Severity Outcomes of the Mohave rattlesnake (Crotalus scutulatus scutulatus) from Southern Arizonaen_US
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Reporten
dc.contributor.departmentCollege of Pharmacy, The University of Arizonaen
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item is part of the Pharmacy Student Research Projects collection, made available by the College of Pharmacy and the University Libraries at the University of Arizona. For more information about items in this collection, please contact Jennifer Martin, Associate Librarian and Clinical Instructor, Pharmacy Practice and Science, jenmartin@email.arizona.edu.en
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