Frequency of Exhibited Symptoms in the Exposure to Synthetic Cathinones

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/614458
Title:
Frequency of Exhibited Symptoms in the Exposure to Synthetic Cathinones
Author:
Chau, Connie; Choi, Robyn; Boesen, Keith
Affiliation:
College of Pharmacy, The University of Arizona
Issue Date:
2012
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author.
Collection Information:
This item is part of the Pharmacy Student Research Projects collection, made available by the College of Pharmacy and the University Libraries at the University of Arizona. For more information about items in this collection, please contact Jennifer Martin, Associate Librarian and Clinical Instructor, Pharmacy Practice and Science, jenmartin@email.arizona.edu.
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Abstract:
Specific Aims: The purpose of this study is to identify the incidence of symptoms associated after exposure to “bath salts,” a term for synthetic cathinones in Arizona. Methods: This is a retrospective chart review of reported exposures to synthetic cathinones to the Arizona Poison and Drug Information Center and the Banner Good Samaritan Poison and Drug Information Center. Main Results: There were 306 cases of synthetic cathinone exposures reviewed and 76.5% were males (n=234) and 23.5% were females (n=72). They were ingested, inhaled, snorted, or injected. The mean age of exposure to synthetic cathinones was 29 years old. The most common symptoms included agitation (48.7%), hallucinations (27.1%), confusion (17.6%), hypertension (21.9%), tachycardia (50.6%), CK elevation (17.3%) and chest pain (9.5%). Less frequent symptoms exhibited in synthetic cathinone abuse included other CNS effects, gastrointestinal symptoms, muscular dysfunction, visual disturbances, and respiratory issues. Conclusions: The symptoms exhibited after exposure to synthetic cathinones were mainly neurologic and cardiovascular. In most cases, symptoms were effectively resolved within 24 to 48 hours after treatment with intravenous fluids and benzodiazepines. In some reports, patients were also given oxygen, anti-emetics, sedatives and anti-psychotic medications. Medical outcomes included major (1.6%), moderate (42.2%) and minor effects (26.1%) while 92 patients were lost to follow-up.
Description:
Class of 2012 Abstract
Keywords:
symptoms; exposure; cathinones; synthetic
Advisor:
Boesen, Keith

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.advisorBoesen, Keithen
dc.contributor.authorChau, Connieen
dc.contributor.authorChoi, Robynen
dc.contributor.authorBoesen, Keithen
dc.date.accessioned2016-06-23T18:25:56Z-
dc.date.available2016-06-23T18:25:56Z-
dc.date.issued2012-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/614458-
dc.descriptionClass of 2012 Abstracten
dc.description.abstractSpecific Aims: The purpose of this study is to identify the incidence of symptoms associated after exposure to “bath salts,” a term for synthetic cathinones in Arizona. Methods: This is a retrospective chart review of reported exposures to synthetic cathinones to the Arizona Poison and Drug Information Center and the Banner Good Samaritan Poison and Drug Information Center. Main Results: There were 306 cases of synthetic cathinone exposures reviewed and 76.5% were males (n=234) and 23.5% were females (n=72). They were ingested, inhaled, snorted, or injected. The mean age of exposure to synthetic cathinones was 29 years old. The most common symptoms included agitation (48.7%), hallucinations (27.1%), confusion (17.6%), hypertension (21.9%), tachycardia (50.6%), CK elevation (17.3%) and chest pain (9.5%). Less frequent symptoms exhibited in synthetic cathinone abuse included other CNS effects, gastrointestinal symptoms, muscular dysfunction, visual disturbances, and respiratory issues. Conclusions: The symptoms exhibited after exposure to synthetic cathinones were mainly neurologic and cardiovascular. In most cases, symptoms were effectively resolved within 24 to 48 hours after treatment with intravenous fluids and benzodiazepines. In some reports, patients were also given oxygen, anti-emetics, sedatives and anti-psychotic medications. Medical outcomes included major (1.6%), moderate (42.2%) and minor effects (26.1%) while 92 patients were lost to follow-up.en
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author.en
dc.subjectsymptomsen
dc.subjectexposureen
dc.subjectcathinonesen
dc.subjectsyntheticen
dc.titleFrequency of Exhibited Symptoms in the Exposure to Synthetic Cathinonesen_US
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Reporten
dc.contributor.departmentCollege of Pharmacy, The University of Arizonaen
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item is part of the Pharmacy Student Research Projects collection, made available by the College of Pharmacy and the University Libraries at the University of Arizona. For more information about items in this collection, please contact Jennifer Martin, Associate Librarian and Clinical Instructor, Pharmacy Practice and Science, jenmartin@email.arizona.edu.en
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