In Vitro Effect of Nonconventional Accessory Devices on Throat Deposition and Respirable Mass

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/614433
Title:
In Vitro Effect of Nonconventional Accessory Devices on Throat Deposition and Respirable Mass
Author:
Hammer, Carrie L.; Bertsch, Matthew D.; Myrdal, Paul B.; Sheth, Poonam
Affiliation:
College of Pharmacy, The University of Arizona
Issue Date:
2012
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author.
Collection Information:
This item is part of the Pharmacy Student Research Projects collection, made available by the College of Pharmacy and the University Libraries at the University of Arizona. For more information about items in this collection, please contact Jennifer Martin, Associate Librarian and Clinical Instructor, Pharmacy Practice and Science, jenmartin@email.arizona.edu.
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Abstract:
Specific Aims: To evaluate the in vitro throat deposition and respirable mass of the QVAR® pressurized metered-dose inhaler (pMDI) alone or coupled to an accessory device, such as the AeroChamber Valved Holding ChamberTM or various nonconventional accessory devices. Methods: The performance of the AeroChamber and nonconventional accessory devices, including a toilet paper roll, paper towel roll, rolled paper, plastic bottle spacer, plastic bottle reverse-flow holding chamber, and nebulizer reservoir tubing, were compared to no accessory device. Throat deposition and respirable mass were evaluated using a United States Pharmacopeia (USP) inlet ("throat") coupled to instrumentation for particle size analysis. Each configuration was tested with three actuations and repeated in quadruplicate. The amount of drug deposition was quantified using high-performance liquid chromatography. The data were analyzed using multiple independent t-tests assuming unequal variances. An a priori α-threshold of 0.05 was used with a Bonferroni corrected α of 0.007. Main Results: Compared to the pMDI alone, all of the accessory devices had significantly lower throat deposition (p < 0.001) and significantly higher respirable fraction (p < 0.001). Differences in respirable mass were not significant for any accessory device (p ≥ 0.049), except the paper towel roll and the nebulizer reservoir tubing (p < 0.001). Conclusions: Under these testing circumstances, nonconventional accessory devices, such as the toilet paper roll, rolled paper, plastic bottle spacer, and plastic bottle reverse-flow holding chamber, effectively reduce throat deposition and maintain respirable mass compared to a QVAR pMDI alone. Therefore, they may be suitable alternatives to commercial spacers.
Description:
Class of 2012 Abstract
Keywords:
In Vitro; pressurized metered-dose inhaler (pMDI); AeroChamber Valved Holding ChamberTM; United States Pharmacopeia (USP); QVAR®
Advisor:
Myrdal, Paul B.; Sheth, Poonam

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.advisorMyrdal, Paul B.en
dc.contributor.advisorSheth, Poonamen
dc.contributor.authorHammer, Carrie L.en
dc.contributor.authorBertsch, Matthew D.en
dc.contributor.authorMyrdal, Paul B.en
dc.contributor.authorSheth, Poonamen
dc.date.accessioned2016-06-23T18:06:45Z-
dc.date.available2016-06-23T18:06:45Z-
dc.date.issued2012-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/614433-
dc.descriptionClass of 2012 Abstracten
dc.description.abstractSpecific Aims: To evaluate the in vitro throat deposition and respirable mass of the QVAR® pressurized metered-dose inhaler (pMDI) alone or coupled to an accessory device, such as the AeroChamber Valved Holding ChamberTM or various nonconventional accessory devices. Methods: The performance of the AeroChamber and nonconventional accessory devices, including a toilet paper roll, paper towel roll, rolled paper, plastic bottle spacer, plastic bottle reverse-flow holding chamber, and nebulizer reservoir tubing, were compared to no accessory device. Throat deposition and respirable mass were evaluated using a United States Pharmacopeia (USP) inlet ("throat") coupled to instrumentation for particle size analysis. Each configuration was tested with three actuations and repeated in quadruplicate. The amount of drug deposition was quantified using high-performance liquid chromatography. The data were analyzed using multiple independent t-tests assuming unequal variances. An a priori α-threshold of 0.05 was used with a Bonferroni corrected α of 0.007. Main Results: Compared to the pMDI alone, all of the accessory devices had significantly lower throat deposition (p < 0.001) and significantly higher respirable fraction (p < 0.001). Differences in respirable mass were not significant for any accessory device (p ≥ 0.049), except the paper towel roll and the nebulizer reservoir tubing (p < 0.001). Conclusions: Under these testing circumstances, nonconventional accessory devices, such as the toilet paper roll, rolled paper, plastic bottle spacer, and plastic bottle reverse-flow holding chamber, effectively reduce throat deposition and maintain respirable mass compared to a QVAR pMDI alone. Therefore, they may be suitable alternatives to commercial spacers.en
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author.en
dc.subjectIn Vitroen
dc.subjectpressurized metered-dose inhaler (pMDI)en
dc.subjectAeroChamber Valved Holding ChamberTMen
dc.subjectUnited States Pharmacopeia (USP)en
dc.subjectQVAR®en
dc.titleIn Vitro Effect of Nonconventional Accessory Devices on Throat Deposition and Respirable Massen_US
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Reporten
dc.contributor.departmentCollege of Pharmacy, The University of Arizonaen
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item is part of the Pharmacy Student Research Projects collection, made available by the College of Pharmacy and the University Libraries at the University of Arizona. For more information about items in this collection, please contact Jennifer Martin, Associate Librarian and Clinical Instructor, Pharmacy Practice and Science, jenmartin@email.arizona.edu.en
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