Impact of Olanzapine on Refractory Chemotherapy-Induced Nausea and Vomiting: a Retrospective Study

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/614310
Title:
Impact of Olanzapine on Refractory Chemotherapy-Induced Nausea and Vomiting: a Retrospective Study
Author:
Seibert, Laurel; Vig, Sierra; Green, Myke
Affiliation:
College of Pharmacy, The University of Arizona
Issue Date:
2013
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author.
Collection Information:
This item is part of the Pharmacy Student Research Projects collection, made available by the College of Pharmacy and the University Libraries at the University of Arizona. For more information about items in this collection, please contact Jennifer Martin, Associate Librarian and Clinical Instructor, Pharmacy Practice and Science, jenmartin@email.arizona.edu.
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Abstract:
Specific Aims: To describe the outcomes of olanzapine in the treatment of refractory chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV). Methods: Data were collected regarding demographic information, chemotherapy regimen, CINV prophylaxis, rescue antiemetics, and olanzapine usage for subjects, age 18-79, who were admitted to the University of Arizona Medical Center for chemotherapy and received at least one dose of olanzapine for CINV between January 2008 and January 2012. The primary outcome measure was the number of rescue antiemetics required following the first dose of olanzapine (greater than 10 doses was considered treatment failure). Comparisons using chi square to determine if differences existed with respect to the level of chemotherapy emetogenicity and demographic information were conducted. Main Results: No statistical difference between chemotherapy regimens of high versus low-to-moderate emetogenicity was seen (P=0.79). However, 7 of 10 (70%) subjects receiving highly emetogenic chemotherapy achieved success and 15 of 23 (65%) subjects receiving low-to-moderately emetogenic chemotherapy achieved success. No statistical differences appeared when evaluating usage of 1 versus 2 or more prophylactic antiemetics (P=0.77), men versus women (P=0.08), and age over 50 versus 50 years or younger (P<0.99). Conclusion: This study demonstrated a trend towards greater emetic control with the addition of olanzapine in patients failing first-line antiemetic pharmacotherapy. Additionally, a trend towards greater emetic control was seen in women. The rates of success among all groups may suggest benefit to adding olanzapine to subjects experiencing refractory CINV. Due to the limited sample size and retrospective methodology of the study, the use of olanzapine in refractory CINV merits further research with large, prospective studies directly comparing addition of olanzapine to other appropriate antiemetics.
Description:
Class of 2013 Abstract
Keywords:
Olanzapine; Chemotherapy-Induced; Vomiting; Nausea
Advisor:
Green, Myke

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.advisorGreen, Mykeen
dc.contributor.authorSeibert, Laurelen
dc.contributor.authorVig, Sierraen
dc.contributor.authorGreen, Mykeen
dc.date.accessioned2016-06-22T22:48:50Z-
dc.date.available2016-06-22T22:48:50Z-
dc.date.issued2013-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/614310-
dc.descriptionClass of 2013 Abstracten
dc.description.abstractSpecific Aims: To describe the outcomes of olanzapine in the treatment of refractory chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV). Methods: Data were collected regarding demographic information, chemotherapy regimen, CINV prophylaxis, rescue antiemetics, and olanzapine usage for subjects, age 18-79, who were admitted to the University of Arizona Medical Center for chemotherapy and received at least one dose of olanzapine for CINV between January 2008 and January 2012. The primary outcome measure was the number of rescue antiemetics required following the first dose of olanzapine (greater than 10 doses was considered treatment failure). Comparisons using chi square to determine if differences existed with respect to the level of chemotherapy emetogenicity and demographic information were conducted. Main Results: No statistical difference between chemotherapy regimens of high versus low-to-moderate emetogenicity was seen (P=0.79). However, 7 of 10 (70%) subjects receiving highly emetogenic chemotherapy achieved success and 15 of 23 (65%) subjects receiving low-to-moderately emetogenic chemotherapy achieved success. No statistical differences appeared when evaluating usage of 1 versus 2 or more prophylactic antiemetics (P=0.77), men versus women (P=0.08), and age over 50 versus 50 years or younger (P<0.99). Conclusion: This study demonstrated a trend towards greater emetic control with the addition of olanzapine in patients failing first-line antiemetic pharmacotherapy. Additionally, a trend towards greater emetic control was seen in women. The rates of success among all groups may suggest benefit to adding olanzapine to subjects experiencing refractory CINV. Due to the limited sample size and retrospective methodology of the study, the use of olanzapine in refractory CINV merits further research with large, prospective studies directly comparing addition of olanzapine to other appropriate antiemetics.en
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author.en
dc.subjectOlanzapineen
dc.subjectChemotherapy-Induceden
dc.subjectVomitingen
dc.subjectNauseaen
dc.titleImpact of Olanzapine on Refractory Chemotherapy-Induced Nausea and Vomiting: a Retrospective Studyen_US
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Reporten
dc.contributor.departmentCollege of Pharmacy, The University of Arizonaen
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item is part of the Pharmacy Student Research Projects collection, made available by the College of Pharmacy and the University Libraries at the University of Arizona. For more information about items in this collection, please contact Jennifer Martin, Associate Librarian and Clinical Instructor, Pharmacy Practice and Science, jenmartin@email.arizona.edu.en
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